Old Hat For Daisy Deer…

A month ago, I wondered if Daisy deer would return to our neck of the woods to set up her nursery this year. Five years ago, FD and I took Daisy in as an orphan when, after a couple of days, there was no sign that a mother had returned to feed her. This ten acres, and beyond, has been Daisy’s home all of her life. During the winter months, she roams with a small herd of local does from the Ten Acre Ranch to the river, just a half mile away. Each spring, she returns to our home place (her home place) to set up a nursery area in which to have her twins. For three years now, she has birthed her babies in the neighbor’s backyard. But this year, we know she will have to find another place. We just hope it is on our place.

Last summer, our neighbor took in a pregnant female dog that someone dumped off by his home. Being on the edge of town on property zoned as agricultural, it is not uncommon to find unwanted dogs and cats abandoned here. This female had eight puppies. Six of them lived. And our neighbor has decided to keep all of them. They are a large, pit-mix breed. Not having real secure fences, the adventurous bunch, unfortunately, often get loose. This has made for a very unhappy situation for me. It has not helped my mood to catch photos on our game cameras of these large, intimidating dogs chasing all wildlife from the feeding area – especially the deer. A couple of night photos showed Daisy running with two of the dogs in hot pursuit. Sometimes it is Ms. Foxy who is being chased. Day escapes are equally disturbing. Squirrels scold their presence, and a cacophony of bird alerts ring out as the barking mob passes through. One morning, I watched hopelessly as they tromped through my lettuce garden, smashing new sprouts, and urinating on my established herbs and leaf lettuce. I ran outside to shoo them away,  but they were already off to harass the chickens. Sadly, they know their way around the place.

We keep Purina Antler Max Watershed feed out year-round. All sorts of wildlife benefits from the protein content.
We keep Purina Antler Max Watershed feed out year-round. All sorts of wildlife benefits from the protein content.
Daisy is growing a big belly!
Daisy is growing a big belly!
Daisy frequents three of the large clover plots on the place. We have noticed a lot of bees, butterflies and hummingbirds hitting the blossoms this year.
Daisy frequents three of the large clover plots on the place. We have noticed a lot of bees, butterflies and hummingbirds hitting the blossoms this year.
Daisy does not seem bothered by mosquitoes. Sometimes the sides of her face and her legs are black with these pests!
Daisy does not seem bothered by mosquitoes. Sometimes the sides of her face and her legs are black with these pests!
Dead leaves are a big part of a deer's diet.
Dead leaves are a big part of a deer’s diet.
No udder developing yet!
No udder developing yet!
Daisy heads off to the west to find a place to rest and chew her cud.
Daisy heads off to the west to find a place to rest and chew her cud.

Despite the mayhem of dogs running through our property, I have been surprised a few times lately, to find Daisy emerge from the lush green of the woodlands to feed on corn and deer feed down below our slope. She also spends a little time munching in the new clover patch down below, and she nibbles on tree greens, twigs and dead leaves on the ground. After eating, she licks on the mineral block, gets a long drink of cool water at the wildlife water tub, and then sets off into the thick of the woods. Where she goes after that, I can only guess – maybe over to the neighbor’s property to the west. They also have a wild and woolly woodland bottom. I am confident Daisy is nearby, and has found a place to birth her babies close to home. For now, she is a contented mama-to-be, eating everything in sight and doing a lot of resting, and growing that enormous belly! When I am fortunate to spot her at the feeders, I don a long-sleeved jacket and grab the camera. When I am with her, I help pull winter hair off of her and pick ticks from her face. I also shoo away mosquitoes and flies while she eats. And when she has finished grazing, I usually follow her into the woods, until I can take no more of the mosquitoes, or get spooked by a snake!

Meanwhile, I will keep close watch on her udder and I follow her as much as I can to see where she might be going. In the past, Daisy has had her babies any time from the 24th of May to the 5th of June. I have a feeling I might need to secure one of those mosquito net hats, and possibly some snake-proof boots if I am to keep up with Daisy and locate her birthing area!

Little Mama.
Little Mama.

© 2016 Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…


68 thoughts on “Old Hat For Daisy Deer…

  1. I love dogs but gee that neighbor should be a good neighbor and keep those dogs contained. Running loose is not good for anything or anybody. If you asked might he consider penning them up for several months or keep them behind a dog proof fence?

    I feel your anxiety- just reading about Daisy and the run amuck dogs make my stomach queasy. I surely hope her babies will be safe this year.

    By all means get the boots and a mosquitos net hat. It’ll save you from fear and aggravation.

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    1. I will order a couple of mosquito net hats. As wild as the woods can be, I fear I’ll be patching a lot of rips, but it’s worth a try. Our neighbor’s property does have a 4 ft. fence between the properties but I’ve seen the mama dog jump that and she’s the smallest of the group. We’ve patched in areas between our properties with some of our spare cattle panels, but there are just too many places all around his property perimeter for them to escape. I can’t imagine what it will cost him to put up fencing. It isn’t just our property they’ve visited. Most of the immediate neighbors have reported them running loose. Yvonne… I pray Daisy and her babies will be safe too. I have to trust her instinct. Thank you for your compassion.

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    1. Hello Henri! I have enjoyed a few walks with Daisy lately – even though the mosquitoes about drive me insane! Our woodland bottom holds more water after some catastrophic rains last year. The whole outlay of the bottom has changed. It’s almost magical and beautiful after a rain, but by the time a week or more has passed, it’s infested with hatched mosquitoes. And to boot, the ticks are bad this year. I hope for a good outcome for Daisy this year. Perhaps the change in nursery will be good. I’ll be hopeful about it! 🙂

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  2. I hate hearing about the dogs running loose and being a nuisance. I don’t understand why people allow their pets (if you can call them that) to run loose and invade other properties that way. We had a terrible problem here in town with a neighbour who allowed their dog to stay out all night and bark. We asked them and asked them to put it in at night but they didn’t. Finally after years of that behaviour we had to get the rangers involved. They finally fitted the dog with a citronella collar and told them if they were reported again, there would be a very large fine. That seems to have finally fixed the problem except for the occasional night here and there. I’m guessing you don’t have that kind of recourse on a rural property as you are. Anyway, lovely to see Daisy again. Hopefully her fawns will survive this year. Thank you Lori.

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    1. Ardys, I think many communities have problems with dogs. It sounds like your community is more proactive than ours. This city is aware of the problem with loose dogs (several neighbors let their big dogs out to run in the mornings), but even if they could capture the dogs, the penalty is very small. And the man who owns the pecan orchard has just recently put cattle back in the area. Most farmers and ranchers around these parts will shoot any animal that threatens their livestock. Daisy seems to understand that fences keep them at bay, because most of the neighbors in the alley have dogs now (not any when she was a little fawn) and she observes them, keeping hidden in the woods, and is cautious, but she seems to understand that they cannot get to her. I know she has to deal with wild dogs that occasionally come this close to town, and there are always coyotes too. She’s quite savvy to keep clear of them. Deer can outrun them (unless they’re in an organized pack) and deer are excellent at moving in stealth mode.

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    1. Tom, I had not even considered the Zika virus. I believe all mammals can acquire WNV though. I take precautions as best I can. If you follow any animal around enough, it’s interesting to note what they eat and how they live. Daisy sure has helped me understand about plant life here. Who knew that deer eat poison ivy? We let it grow now… we just have to be careful to spot it when IN a patch of it!! 🙂

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        1. Thank you for the tip, Tom! I never used to have problems with poison ivy until two years ago and whammo!! It got me good! I’ll see where I can get Zanfel and keep it on hand!

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          1. Agggh! When one is in that kind of pain and misery, the cost is worth it!! Thanks for all of the information!! I sure appreciate it, though I plan to keep out of the poison ivy if I can! 😀

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    1. Yes, most all of the neighbors have reported to the city Animal Control officer and the police. I’m not sure what will be done. I’m not even sure it’s legal to have so many dogs in city limits. I hosed down my garden that morning – it’s just a small lettuce and herb bed near the house that I frequent while cooking. Our big garden is fenced to protect it. But my new seedlings were just sprouting and most of those were destroyed. I guess if this continues I’ll just give up that little garden patch and put flowers in. 😦

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    1. It’s an exciting time! We have baby birds at the back porch… I think the Cardinal’s have taken over – they scold us every time we go back there! Lots of fledglings on the property too, learning to fly. 🙂

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  3. There’s a reason it’s illegal for dogs to run loose. And you know I’m a dog loving advocate and give all my book’s profits over to rescuing them from kill shelters but ethical dog owners need to be sensitive to the laws to protect society and their dogs. You can find out about the code for number of dogs allowed by going to your city’s/county’s government code section. It should say. If you can’t find it then a phone call to the agency that oversees animal regulation should be able to direct you to it. I hope this gets under control for Daisy and her family. And your anxiety level.

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    1. Thank you, Paulette. Everyone should have access to local government codes. We have a new city manager and after years of laxity about a lot of situations in this community, I believe there is an honest effort to get some issues under control. Animal problems are one of them. The neighbors have been patient, as have we about the dogs getting loose, but I worry something catastrophic lies ahead. One of the neighbor’s grandkids got cornered by 3 of the dogs in their garage the other day. My father-in-law has been mobbed by them a couple of times. I’ve caught them jumping at the fences around our chicken pen. They’re just big, clumsy puppies right now, but they’re still big enough to knock a person over and hurt them even if they’re just being playful. And once a chicken killer, always a chicken killer. And if they become cattle chasers, I’m pretty sure they’ll see a bullet to the head. Killing or maiming cattle is serious business around these parts.

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    1. Hello, Charlotte. Deer are beautiful and of course it is very special to have had this experience with Daisy and her young all of these years. We have also become familiar with the other does and bucks that Daisy runs with – especially during the winter months. Being able to observe them has been very educational and entertaining. Hunting season (October 1st thru January 15th here) is always a worry for me. I am thankful Daisy is a small dear and she looks more like a yearling than an adult doe.

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  4. As a dog owner I love my boys BUT I also know the damage that they could do if I let them roam free on our, or anyone elses property. Its not because my boys are pitbulls, but more because they are “dogs”. When you take on the ownership of dogs you also take on the responsibility of keeping them contained. Our boys have a large fenced area around our house that they are allowed to roam freely in. God help any wildlife (or chooks) that invade Poland but they now know that it’s not safe inside these walls (EARL! 😉 ). To allow your dogs to roam free on your own property is one thing, but to let them cross over onto someone elses property is an offence. I think you might have to chat to your neighbour about it (well…F.D. might have to take a few beers over and chew the fat…). It might be time for your neighbour to realise that dog ownership comes with some clauses and those clauses tend to be legal ones. If he won’t come to the party it might be time to have a bit of a chat with the powers that be. My dad used to let his dog roam far and wide. He was a bad owner as far as I am concerned. Dogs need to know their limits or they start making up new ones to push (much like kids) and dogs are only a hop-step-and a jump away from wild animals. Cats are the same but as they are smaller they do less damage. This man needs to do something about his dogs and he needs to be reminded about the law. Try the friendly approach first as he is a neighbour but if that doesn’t work, you might have to point out that your property is not his dogs hunting grounds and I am sure that there are many legal jurisdictions that would back you up. Might be time to arm yourself with your rights. Phone up your local county “whatever” (sorry, not sure how the law works over there or who doles it out) and find out what laws he is violating and how much it will cost him if he keeps doing it. People tend to respond better when they know that it is going to hit them in the hip pocket…best of luck with this situation. There are far too many people who have no sense of responsibility these days.

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    1. Ha ha! Fran, I knew you’d have something to say on this! I can well imagine (having read in your blog for a couple of years, some insight into Earl’s world) what you and Steve have had to contend with, taking in two large dogs. Yes, we all fall in love with those cute puppies, but responsibility is the greater challenge. I have three little Japanese Chin. By the time we pay for licensing, meds, flea and tick control, various immunizations, and now – comfort care, because they’re all aging and have issues, it is costing us a small fortune. Fencing will cost the neighbor a fortune, but it’s a must being in town, and a legal responsibility. I’m being patient but I have seen no activity whatsoever with fence building. And it’s exasperating every time I see them chasing my girl down in the bottom at night, and knowing that much of the wildlife will not return if it happens too many times. I was also very upset about my lettuce and herb patch. I do have two other fenced in garden areas… I may just have to forget this other space and plant flowers. 😦

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  5. Daisy deer is back – and how! Gripping account. And, of course, even if the dogs are annoying, they are, well, dogs! Be careful but bear with them 😉

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    1. Ah, yes, Mandeep. I am a dog lover myself and I do understand. And the neighbor has vowed to put up appropriate fencing. It will cost him a small fortune, but a legal necessity if he wishes to keep them. I have three small dogs… expenses to keep them with shots and meds and now as they’re elderly the comfort needs are way beyond what I ever thought I would be dealing with (there’s another blog post!) so I can’t imagine him having seven dogs to deal with over the years. It’s expensive!

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      1. I know what it’s like. We’ve had Tyson for years and he’s been a ‘maintenance-free’ pet but we adopted a Pekingese a month and a half ago and are already realising keeping him would be tough, particularly with all the eye problems associated with “flat faced” dogs! All said and done, they are wonderful creatures and a pleasure to have around!

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        1. Each breed has its problems. I have flat-faced dogs and every one of them has had injuries. Now that they are elderly, it’s like running a little canine nursing home. It’s easy and fun when they’re little… but I cannot imagine having seven large dogs when they are 10+ years old.

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  6. PIty about the irresponsible neighbor letting the dogs run loose and escape that way. I’ve had pitties and generally they’re wonderful dogs, but like any dog, they will do as they please if they’re allowed to run free, that’s just wrong as far as I’m concerned. It wouldn’t matter what kind of dogs they were, running in a pack like that encourages wild behavior and it seems that you’ve got an almost feral pack forming. That is a dangerous situation regardless of breed or mix. We had a Doberman/Shepherd mix that was allowed to run loose in the neighborhood that eventually killed several smaller dogs, after being forced by the city to contain the dog they neighbor used to tie it out on the front stair railing (iron in concrete), but the chain was long enough to reach beyond the city sidewalk and that blasted dog would threaten people walking down the street. You couldn’t see him laying by the front stairs and suddenly there was this big dog, growling in front of you and once he had his paws on my shoulders almost knocking me down when the owner came out and pulled him off. He bit someone a day or so later and the neighbor was ordered to keep the dog behind a six foot fence (from which he managed to escape a couple times). That dog bit everyone in that family and really should’ve been put down, he was a truly dangerous dog. I hope Daisy will continue watchful and careful. You be careful too. It would be a good idea to see about further information from animal control and the police. Keep calling and complaining, eventually they’ll do something, especially if those dogs threaten people.

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    1. Wow! That situation you described it terrible. I didn’t consider the “pack encouraging wild behavior” theory. You know that has been a problem here in the past with dogs going feral, running the countryside. In that case the game warden would become involved. I think regulation varies from community to community. It’s been very lax here in the past. We’ve even had animal control tell us to save them the time and just shoot whatever we don’t want invading our property (we are not in city limits). While I am respectful of other’s rights to have pets, I also expect responsibility on their part too. I hope that the neighbor is true to his word that appropriate fences will go up. I just hope it’s soon. I worry for Daisy – her soon to be birthed fawns, and the other deer. There are lots of expecting does in the area this year.

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      1. I also hope your neighbor get thoses fences up quickly. I refuse to get involved in the argument that pit bull mixes are inherently vicious, they’re not, I’ve had several and found them to be wonderful family pets if properly raised, disiplined and kept on their own property. The whole neighborhood was very relieved when that Doberman/Shepherd finally died, I would never have kept a dog that bit every family member. I did get bitten by one of my own dogs but considering the circumstances it wasn’t the dog’s fault, wasn’t mine either, a result from another person’s behavior that caused the incident. Best wishes for sweet Daisy and her coming babies. Take care.

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    1. Thank you, C. Yes, I am trying to be calm and hopeful. It will be what it will be and I will deal with whatever happens. I think after losing her fawns at so many ages and so many different situations, I realize just how brutal nature can be for all species.

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  7. I would be persistent in assuring those dogs are not allowed to wander. They pose a danger not only to animals, but also to humans. The fact that they cornered a child and mobbed your father-in-law are reasons enough for the city to take action. Before someone is injured or killed. That seems a possibility.

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    1. Yes, Audrey, I quite agree and was astonished at the neighbor lady saying several of the dogs had their grandson cornered in their open garage. My father-in-law isn’t a frail man and he’s had to ward them off twice now. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve shoo’d them from the chicken pen. I was trying to help the neighbor get them back over on his side one day by opening a place in the fence that we used to have open for Daisy and her fawns to pass through, but I couldn’t work the fence for what those dogs were clobbering me in play. I know they’re just being dogs, but their size makes them a danger.

      I think everyone is being patient as they can be. The neighbor has said he will build taller fence. It needs to happen soon. 🙂

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  8. This is a large unruly dog pack. For your own and FD’s safety, please ask the neighbor to consider a stronger fence. Perhaps you could offer to help build it?

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    1. We have discussed fences and the neighbor he said he would put an appropriate one up covering the perimeter of his backyard property. FD and I already took down livestock panel fence of our own, to use the panels to heighten part of the fence between our properties… but that only covered the places I actually saw the mama dog leap over. The dogs are getting out in several places (I’d guess it’s a 5-acre property) and not just venturing on our property. Most of the immediate neighbors to the front of his house and all along the street are complaining. It’s a matter of him investing in a lot of fence, or he’ll need to add height and patch holes in the current fences and limit them to a small area behind his house (there is an existing 4 ft fence in a small backyard area). And, I don’t mind helping neighbors, but this will be a huge project – he’ll have to hire it done.

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      1. Sounds like he is keeping too many to handle. And 5 acres may be too small. Male pups will be looking for their own territory soon. Maybe he will take care of it soon.

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  9. Nice to see Daisy and your neighbor is an inconsiderate moron. Can’t you just shoot his loose dogs if they are running on your property causing mayhem?

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    1. I’m happy Daisy has come back, and I know in part this is her “needy” time – miserable with the heat setting on so she likes her coat groomed and ticks picked off of her! I’m just hopeful she still finds our place safe enough to birth her babies here. And yes, legally we’re within rights to shoot any animal that threatens livestock since we’re not in city limits. I’m a dog lover too, but I’m also responsible. I expect the same of others.

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  10. What a truly wonderful life you have. How fabulous it is to be one with nature as you are! I love your stories and your pictures, keep sharing. I can’t get over all the mosquitos on her face and more so that it didn’t bother her. That’s a shame about your neighbors dogs…perhaps you could put up some kind of fence to help keep them out, especially out of your herb garden, and from frightening the other animals. Keep us posted on Miss Daisy, I know you will!! Hope everything goes fine for her and her babies! Yeah you should get a mosquito hat for sure. 🙂

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    1. Thank you, Deb. There is a chain link fence between our properties, but the dogs are large and can jump it. We’ve reinforced and added some spare cattle panels on our side for added height, but we cannot afford to do that for the entire length. We’re talking ten acres worth of fence if we built fence to keep them out. That would cost an astronomical figure to build. I am afraid that is why he has not built a fence. As for Miss Daisy, I’ll be sure to keep everyone updated on her progress. Her udder is beginning to fill so it will be another week, maybe two!! 🙂

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      1. Yeah I was afraid the 10 acres would be the problem. Maybe you could ask God to keep these wonderful creatures of his (the dogs) out of the garden and off of your property when His other wonderful creatures are around. I did that for my bird feeder, when Mr. Squirrel would feast on it all day and it seems to have helped, he now feasts for a short while and leaves some for the birds too. I love dogs, don’t get me wrong, but your neighbor should keep a better eye on them.
        Oooh ok on Miss Daisy… 🙂

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  11. That’s really sad to hear about the neighbours dogs being allowed to run amok, they can really disrupt the local wildlife! I thought at first your neighbour was a star by taking in the abandoned dog, but keeping most the pups and then letting them run wild isn’t very thoughtful at all 😦
    But at least it appears that Daisy is ok, and from what you’ve said, you’re hoping she’ll be a mother once again soon 🙂 And you make me really appreciate our local countryside around here, NO mosquitoes! or snakes! to contend with 🙂

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    1. Andy, any time you mention snakes or insects I think of your wife’s dislike of creepy crawlies! 🙂 I have ordered some mosquito nets for use with hats or caps. I ordered extra in case I get snagged up on trees in the woods! You know, you’ve made a point – perhaps since Daisy is doing “ok” by visiting, she’s comfortable enough with the area including the dogs, and it could be that in some way maybe those dogs and their ruckus keeps other predators at bay. All things happen for a reason I guess. I hope everything goes well too.

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  12. You have neighborhood dog problems and have a neighbors cats harassing my chickens… not to mention they pee on my coop. Always something, but on the bright side the dogs presence at your place might make the area an unfavorable place for predators. Maybe you could mention to your neighbors the dogs need to be managed responsibly? Like that ever works… ha ha! I chose to be more creative, telling my neighbors it’s only a matter of time before our resident coyote has their cats for dinner. I’m seeing the cats a little less lately! Success.

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    1. Yay! Success is always so sweet! We have feral cats occasionally and while I did not care for the presence of so many fox on our property, I did discover over the last year that the fox eat cats. However, two nights ago the neighbors dogs were out again (saw them on the game camera) and I found a huge hole dug by the chick pen, and also at the front gate (trying to get out), and worst of all, a dead baby fox in our back yard. I was so sad yesterday… and angry. It took me a long time to get my head right. Daisy’s time to deliver gets closer – and those hooligans are still escaping his yard! And yes, our chick fencing/area is protected by wire fencing down in the ground, but these are big dogs – not too sure they couldn’t find a way to get in.

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  13. Hi Lori! I’m behind in my reading. Been recovering from jet lag and trying to get the cabin ready for summertime. I’m glad to hear Daisy is managing OK with those dogs on the loose. What a nuisance! I thought of you yesterday while sitting at our pond. A distressed deer emerged from the woods, making a huffing noise, and she seemed really strange. Extra paranoid and jumpy (literally jumping around). She looked weird too. I guess she’s molting? Anyway, she was alone, which is unusual. The deer here tend to wander around in small groups. We have six regulars. And now two have velvety little horns. It’s fun to watch them in the spring, as they chase each other around and act quite silly, even taking a little dip in the pond!

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    1. Gee Monica, you are fortunate to be able to observe the deer like that. I find it very fascinating to watch deer at play. We tend to think of only the babies frolicking around but I’ve seen the mothers get involved too! And of course young bucks scamper as well. Only the seasoned, older bucks tend to be more stoic. There is no telling what happened with that distressed deer. I wonder if a predator spooked her and in her flight, she separated from the herd. I bet she is losing her winter coat (they look patchy and ragged) and her slick summer coat is emerging. Ah, and velvet antlers are gorgeous… if nutrition is good in the area, those antlers can grow to be magnificent, even on the young bucks! 🙂

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      1. I agree it’s a fortunate thing to see all these deer. And I find it really amazing and so 21st century how I think of a woman on the Internet whom I’ve never met while I watch them! I’ll say to Chris, “I bet Little Sundog would know why the deer are doing that. I’ll ask her.” Isn’t it a brave new world we live in?😊

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        1. Oh, I know Monica! I was digging weeds in the garden today and I thought about all of the friends I have via the blogosphere. It’s fascinating that we all have our little niche in the world and we share and learn. Just amazing!

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  14. Lori, I found myself getting more and more irritated as I read through the comment section. It’s been 2 weeks since you posted and I certainly hope that the authorities have done something by now. Your neighbor needs to be responsible and the authorities need to make sure that your neighbor obeys the law.
    Perhaps by the time you read this something will have been done!
    Now … I will take a breath …
    Your photos are wonderful as always! Here’s hoping for healthy birthing and babies 🙂

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    1. Laurie, it’s been nice to find encouragement with so many responses. For the last couple of weeks our neighbor has managed to keep the dogs from running loose. There are still no reinforced fences built, which concerns me. Daisy has been showing up at least once a day so I feel she will set up her nursery nearby somewhere. I haven’t noticed any fawns or new mothers in the woods yet so every day we watch and wait. It’s an exciting time. 🙂

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  15. So happy to see Daisy looking so well. You will need one of those netted hats this year – I actually saw one on some national morning show while waiting at the eye doc the other day. Looked like one of those old fashion duster hats women used to wear on tearly cars – who knew they would make a come back
    The dogs are disturbing. Not the breed but the pack thing. As animal control here said “One dog may be bad news, but several dogs in a pack reinforce each other and perform coordinated attacks so a pack is not twice as bad a some dog, but 100 time worse. As they grow in size, skill, cunning, and courage, they will become dangerous. Please ask neighbors who have had incidents to write it down and give it to animal control or local authorities – documentation or previous incidents is important once a person is attacked – and one will in the future if nothing is done. Chicken killers would not be tolerated at all in farm areas I’m familiar with – once they kill, it’s a pattern established. i would ask if the owner has atleast had them neutered, but probably know the answer to that.
    No fair you can’t have a garden! How inconsiderate this guy is.
    Well, anyway, all the rain is making things lush – good for deer needing hiding spots. Watch out for snakes on your Hikes!

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    1. I ordered the mosquito netting and it works like a charm. I was also impressed that I could still use my binoculars and camera without any visual problems. Too bad they don’t have a snag-proof material. It’s not easy to wear them IN the woods! Ha ha! By now several neighbors have complained and my neighbor has agreed to keep three and find homes for the other pups. The mama dog has proven to be a killer. The neighbor admitted to her bringing several baby raccoons to him, and we’ve had some wildlife death here as well – which I’ll write about soon. I am not sure what the city animal control plans to do about the mama dog. I still hope my neighbor keeps his word to secure the fences and add on to contain the three dogs he will keep.

      Farmer’s here say a pack of dogs is much more threatening and dangerous than coyotes. I know the owners of the pecan grove have calves and cows grazing on the land this spring. Some of those calves are mighty little… but I think in a pack dogs can easily take down a full-grown cow too.

      I have another large garden. The one the dogs ran through and urinated on was the lettuce and herb garden. I’ve yanked up most of the lettuce and tossed it to the chickens. They don’t seem to mind the urine smell at all!! It’ll be getting too hot to reseed it and start over. I will probably just forego anything in there this year. Perhaps next year the dogs won’t be an issue. 😦

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      1. We all love dogs, but dog wildness around a community isn’t good for anyone.
        I’m thinking just a giant sheet of neting from head to toe this summer – I’m a mosquito magnet and get huge welts while everyone else is fine – of course – they are all biting me. (Perhaps elastic on the bottom edge of the net sheet….not good for woods, but for these sidewalks, it might work HA HA)

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        1. GADS! I am lucky I guess, only a little redness with mosquito bites for me. The poison ivy is massive this year and that is where I could be in trouble. Today I went looking for Daisy and her fawns and trudged through a lot of poison ivy. On returning home I promptly removed any garments that came into contact with the plant and washed them. I’m not taking any chances after that last miserable bout two years ago with the itch! I think you’re on to something with the body net. It will be a great year to market such a getup in your neck of the woods! 😀

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    1. Oh, I tried today, miserable as it was with mosquitoes and poison ivy down in the woods, but I had no luck. I did see a lot of deer tracks and many evident animal trails through the grasses. I do not think she is far off, and I hoped we would see her feeding at the corn and deer feed today, but only one pregnant doe showed up (a doe Daisy has run with all winter). I have been watching from the house, with my camera at the ready, wearing the proper clothes for woodland hikes. My rubber boots are at the ready too! I’m determined!! 🙂

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