Discarding Unwanted Animals

I had not given much thought to the subject of unwanted puppies in a long time. I cringed the last time I saw  a couple at the Wal-Mart parking lot with puppies loaded up in a clothes basket and a FREE PUPPIES sign attached to their truck.  I wondered what kind of homes those puppies might have in store for them?  Likely, the couple giving them away did not care, asking no questions about where they were going or the kind of home they would be placed in.

Living in town for many years, we never had to worry much about someone dumping off puppies or kittens on our doorstep.  Around here, that kind of thing happens mostly to people who live in the country. We have a good friend who lives just a couple of miles out of town on a busy road who constantly sees dumped and abandoned dogs and cats, puppies and kittens.  They wander around aimlessly, hungry, and without shelter.  While it is always aggravating for him, he feeds them and does the best he can to care for them. Those who are not so lucky, I’m sure, are hit by passing vehicles, while others become prey to larger predators.  Some, likely starve to death.

We adopted Bear in February of 2010 from JCCARE. Bear's owners made the choice to seek help from pet rescues after they lost their jobs and their home, due to tough economic times.
We adopted Bear in February of 2010 from JCCARE. Bear’s owners made the choice to seek help from pet rescues after they lost their jobs and their home, due to tough economic times.

Of course there are also the stray dogs that run around town. They have collars, and owners somewhere, yet run amok over the streets, taking a leak on the neighbors shrubs and flowers or a dump in the middle of a nice stand of grass.  I have chased many of these adventurers off our property, in hopes they go back home.  Not so long ago, someone’s elderly Beagles broke loose and found their way on our property.  Noses to the ground, we found them steadily following some happy trail through mom’s iris beds… perhaps there was some big investigation going on.  Or maybe they were just remembering their days of glory, hunting down a rabbit or a fox!  FD and I laughed at these two old fellas, baying  and crooning as they moved from tree to tree, noses glued to the ground.  Finally, FD managed to lead them out the front gate.  Something told me they would find their way home.

We also see our share of feral cats visiting the ten-acre ranch, wandering the woods, and living a life of solitude.  And we get visits from the neighbors domestic cats as well.  I do not usually get too upset about roaming cats.  They don’t kill chickens or chase Daisy deer around like dogs do.  For us, dogs seem to be the real problem most of the time, whether they have collars and tags or not.

Two weeks ago, I noticed my in-laws scrambling around near the chicken pen.  I figured a couple of chickens might have escaped the pen.  Going over to help them, I quickly realized it wasn’t chickens they were corralling …  instead I discovered they had found two puppies and a small-breed, grown dog.  None were wearing collars.  They were friendly and playful. Immediately, I suspected someone had dumped them off in front of the property.  We led them into Daisy deer’s old pen and Mom put some water out for them.  I put a little dog food out for them while my Father-in-law called animal control.  The person on the other end of the line explained they had a situation they were working on, and it would likely be an hour or so before they could come to take care of the dogs.

After fostering Tori for JCCARE for more than a year, we adopted him. He feared people and refused to walk on tile floors, and we felt he would never be adopted. Tori was turned over to a rescue when his elderly owner was moved to an assisted living facility. Tori is happy and flourishing in his forever home on our little ranch!
Tori was turned over to a rescue when his elderly owner was moved to an assisted living facility. After fostering Tori for JCCARE for more than a year, we adopted him. He feared people, refused to walk on tile floors, and most of his teeth had to be pulled due to poor dental care. We felt he would never be adopted. Tori is happy and flourishing in his forever home on our little ranch!

It turned out to be several hours, actually, before anyone came.  During that time, I went out to pet the little group and tussle with the puppies.  The older dog had a look of worry and sadness.  It huddled near and seemed to want comfort.  The two puppies seemed happy to chase and play, sinking those sharp puppy teeth into my yoga pants, not intending to let go! They were a wild pair!  I wanted to photograph them… but I couldn’t.  I was pretty sure that animal control would have to euthanize them in a few days. I couldn’t look at the photos and know that I had a hand in their demise.

A part of me was angry.  I wondered how someone could just dump off a pet or defenseless animals that been used to a life of being fed and sheltered?  How could they expect these little beings to adjust to surviving on their own? And what if they could not learn to survive?  They would either starve to death,  get hit by a car,  or be taken down by predators.   I supposed, the “dumpers” most likely assumed that someone would take in this motley crew and give them a  home.  Whatever the case, it would not be their problem anymore, it would be someone else’s… and surely, since this neighborhood was a nice one with good people… or, surely someone or several people might take in a puppy or dog?  Or maybe they heard we rehabbed wildlife.

Maybe these people assumed we were animal lovers and would take in some strays. Or, worse than that, they had no caring whatsoever for the dogs, considered them inferior and discarded them like one would a bag of trash.  Whatever their reasoning, they “dumped” their responsibility on others.  I was angry that these “dumpers” forced our family to deal with these trusting babies.  And I was angry because I did not want the responsibility, for myself, nor could I take it on at this time.  My elderly in-laws felt just as sad.  So, we did what everyone else does; we called animal control.  Now, it was not our problem anymore either.

For a few days after I was very sad. I felt terrible. I felt bad about my role in the problem. I kept remembering those sweet, trusting eyes.  I know animals are discarded every day. FD and I have adopted rescue dogs in the past. We felt it was the right thing to give a homeless dog a forever home.  It was a commitment we made with a lot of thought involved.  If one goes to a locator-type source like Petfinder.com for pets on the internet, various types of pets can be found that need homes.  Much of the time, people discard pets due to lifestyle change.  Or possibly, the pet was cute when it was little but, later on, the owner found it had needs he could not provide.

Sheena's original owners were a young couple who decided after a year they didn't have time for her. They advertised her in the local newspaper for $100. She was my special girl for the next 15 years. This photo was taken just a few months before she died. What a delight she was and an extraordinary companion!
Sheena started out as a pet store puppy purchased by a young couple who decided after a year, they didn’t have time for her. They advertised her in the local newspaper for $100. She was my special girl for the next 15 years. A product of poor breeding, she endured two eye surgeries and dealt with other health issues over her lifetime. This photo was taken just a few months before she died. What a delight she was and an extraordinary companion!

To me it is obvious, sad happenings of this nature boil down to ignorance and simple lack of responsibility.  If you do not want a litter of pups or kittens to find homes for, have your pets neutered.  Think about medical issues and age-related problems – all pets have them.  If you can not afford medical expenses or you do not have the time to devote to a pet’s needs, then do not have a pet.  Find out how long you will be making a commitment,  discover the needs and lifestyle that benefit the pet most.  So I say, if you cannot do your best with another living being, then do not go the route of the ignorant and irresponsible.

The weekend after animal control had come for the dogs, my mom-in-law came running across the pasture with the latest edition of our small-town newspaper in hand.  She had been comforted to find photos of the three little dogs on the front page, in color!  With the posting, the animal control officer was making a plea for people to come forth to give these little fellas a home.  He had named the older dog Rufus, described as a “sweet, mixed breed”.  The two others, given the names of Elvis and Presley, were said to be about two months old and very healthy.  I was so happy to see that these three discarded dogs were being given front-page attention, and that the exposure would surely help them find a home.

I keep hoping that the human race will open their eyes to the irresponsible treatment of living creatures and Mother Earth.  We can stop the suffering and waste from continuing. It all begins with awareness, education, and making responsible decisions.  Responsibility comes in many forms, and it is up to each of us to find a way to end the enormity of the situation.  There are many atrocities in the world today… but the worst, to me, is looking away and remaining quiet or happily ignorant of a problem.  My hope, instead, is that each of us will look long and hard at the problems we encounter, and find a way to create something better…

© Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…

Also, you might enjoy reading about another little girl we fostered who came from a puppy mill…   Chyann’s Story

Our foster girl, sweet Chyann. At one year old she was rescued from death at a puppy mill in Arkansas. She eventually found a forever family in Washington State.
Our foster girl, sweet Chyann. At one year old she was rescued from death at a puppy mill in Arkansas. She eventually found a forever family in Washington State.

68 thoughts on “Discarding Unwanted Animals

  1. It is so heartbreaking to see people treat animals like they would a sweater they have outgrown. Very important to promot spay and neuter of pets, to help minimize the “free puppy”” signs that recurrently show up at some people’s driveways. And, actually, free-roaming cats can do serious damage by killing songbirds (not to mention exposing the cats to dangers and disease, or spreading disease if they do roam free or as unvaccinated strays). Tori and Bear are fortunate, as was Sheena (and little Chyann for the time you fostered). Your post reminds people why adopting animals from the shelter is always a great option when looking for a furry friend. ~ Kat

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    1. I worked for my vet for a short time, helping out until he could hire a full-time worker and I was surprised at the number of people who wanted their dogs euthanized when there was nothing seriously wrong with them. Fortunately, he managed to find homes for these dogs and refused to euthanize them. I also learned a lot about the many diseases cats carry, and the importance of vaccinating them. Working with JCCARE I learned even more about the horrors some dogs go through. Even if we cannot have a pet or take on a pet, donations to local rescues and shelters can help so much. There is always a way to be responsible and lend a helping hand! Thanks so much for commenting!

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  2. I’ve been lucky that I hve been able to give a nice home to many pets. Spent much money but this is my thing in lofe. Everything is “fixed” vaccinated and the dogs all have microchips. Mine have the run of an acre about 4-5 times each day. Cats live on a special barn that I haad built for them with a very large run. It makes me sick in the pit of my stomach about horror stories and pets. Those kind of people should go to jail bit they are just given a slap on the hand here in Texas (puppy millers) and animal cruelty.

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    1. Thanks for a great comment! How wonderful that you’ve built a special barn for the cats! And I agree, it’s expensive, but it is our mission in life to help animals of all kind! Here in Oklahoma there is more awareness and I think, a better crack-down on puppy mills. However, it’s only been a few years since legislation to abolish cock-fighting and raising birds for that very sport has gotten attention. Such barbaric animal cruelty and inhumane actions makes me wonder about the mentality of the human race.

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  3. It’s admirable, what you did for these little guys. They’re off the streets, and have a good chance of finding a home. My family is currently up to 8 cats and 4 dogs (not including the one dog who recently passed away, at least 13 years old), all former strays, now living the good life. And my brother recently took in 9 domestic ducks that were dumped at a recycling center. People will dump unwanted animals anywhere. It just breaks my heart when I see ones that are so scared, they run the other way. To try to help them and not be able to… it makes me so angry at whoever put them in that situation in the first place. But I look at the ones I have helped, and it makes things a little easier. To know I made a difference, no matter how small.

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    1. I know Marie Anne… it DOES warm my heart to know there are wonderful and caring people out there willing to help in some way. Bravo to your brother too… ducks are not easy – they are a lot of work! Somehow though, just taking part in doing what we can, gives me hope. May we all be good stewards in creating something better for these unwanted animals! Thank YOU for doing your part so lovingly.

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  4. We have a feral cat explosion on Serendipity Farm that is threatening the bird population. Someone dumped a female cat on the property and someone else “forgot” to get their male cat neutered and BAM…we are now the proud owners of a cat population that admittedly keeps the mice and rats at bay but also the lizards and native birds. As penniless student hippies we can’t afford to feed all of these cats and it is going to be a nightmare to have to catch them all, drive them the 100km round trip to the RSPCA in town and drop them off knowing that they are going to be euthenased…when people abrogate their responsibilities and dump their problems on someone else all we can hope for is a karma trickle back effect. Glad those little pups found a sympathetic animal control officer and that they might have a chance of being given loving forever homes. As a dog lover we keep our boys enclosed at all times. We know what a dog can do and we won’t let our dogs run amok at someone elses expense. Responsible animal ownership is a vital part of this equation…people giving free pups away at Walmart should be picked up by the animal protection and fined for not having a sterlised dog!

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    1. Brilliantly said!! I agree and hope that the “karma trickle back effect” weighs in on this problem. We too have a real feral cat problem. They do kill many of our woodland birds. Some cats become diseased, and some we’ve seen rail thin, starving to death. There are wild dogs too, that frequent our place. For a time we had trouble with a female having her pups under one of our buildings each year. There is no way to capture the feral dogs or cats, yet as you say, the problem becomes an “explosion of sorts… and before we know it, there is a dire problem.

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      1. And our local authorities don’t want to know about it :(. The answer, apparently, is for us to catch them all, drive them all into town and take the poor stressed things to the RSPCA that only opens at 10am. If people knew what feral animals have to go through just to survive they might think twice about paying to have their animals neutered. Sorry to hear you have a wild dog problem. We don’t have that here in Australia as the council rangers are very adroit at catching them but we have a real feral cat problem as we have lots of rabbits, native animals and birds that they catch and eat because they are true carnivores and hunters. If we had a much better fence I would let Earl chase them off the property (he can’t catch them…they are much too fast) but our fences aren’t that great and Earl would disappear along with the cats! Best we hone our trapping skills and deal with the problem… I guess the buck has to stop somewhere.

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        1. It is always interesting to hear how laws and practices vary from region to region. I agree that a person must do what they deem necessary to improve the situation. I believe as long as we are trying to create something better, we are progressing towards a better world! As always, thanks for your very informative narration. I appreciate your input!

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  5. “I keep hoping that the human race will open their eyes to the irresponsible treatment of living creatures and Mother Earth.” Amen, sister! Like you, I’ve been saddened to the point of heartbreak watching how other people treat animals as if they were disposable “things”, to be traded off whenever they become too much to deal with. I’ve got family members who do it too, and that’s even harder to see. I’ve tried to “gently” educate them, to no avail. They allow their cats to roam free, keep dogs in cages 24/7, and replace them with new ones when they die or get hit by cars. It just sickens me.
    Thanks for writing about this, Lori. (You may remember that I wrote a couple posts last June about the stray cats I had to deal with and about how much it upset me.) I agree that part of the solution has got to be education, so the more we can write about it, the better chance we have of reaching the people who really need to hear this loud and clear: You must spay and neuter your pets, people! Just because puppies and kittens are cute is no excuse for letting your pet contribute to the overpopulation problem. Oh…just realized this is YOUR blog, not mine, lol. I’ll shut up for now, but you can probably tell this is a hot-button issue for me too.

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    1. Oh, you can get on the soap box here any time you wish! I didn’t mention in the post about family dumping animals… pets, but it has happened in my family too. I remember putting my foot down about FD’s daughter wanting an iguana for a pet. I have nothing against reptiles, snakes or water life, but I put myself in their place and I wonder about how awful it must be to live in a cage or small, glassed in home all of your life. A young nephew acquired an iguana… and later a second one, and oh my gosh! I had no idea that they get so big, and powerful (they can land a wicked blow with their tails!). I don’t think my nephew or his family realized they would become such a BIG problem. Soon they had outgrown their cages and because the climate in Oklahoma is not iguana-friendly year-round, they had to bring them indoors part of the year, fashioning a living quarters in a closet. The smell was atrocious. Finally, only the Dad could wrangle them when they had to be moved! They are strong, and unpredictable! I don’t think anyone realized just what it would entail to have iguanas… but people often get lost in the “cuteness” of a young animal. There is so much more to having a pet. Just a little research and visiting with others who own any species, will often help to decide if it is a wise choice or not. I long ago realized, we can talk to family for until we’re blue in the face, but people will do as they please and justify it as they wish.

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      1. Yes, you’re right, the human species has mastered the art of justification. And I guess I’m no different because I know about the horrible conditions on poultry farms, yet I continue to eat chicken — not sure if it’s just from habit or because it’s convenient…but this is a big source of moral conflict for me. OMG, did I just write that in public?

        Anyway…back to OTHER people — I often wonder how birders can have pet birds in their homes. Of all people, you’d think birders would understand how awful it is for a flying creature to be forever prevented from flight. Many years ago, before I became enlightened to animal issues, I actually had a pet cockatiel for a year or two. He was so frustrated and lonely that he began an ear-piercing shriek that he repeated all day long. I finally had to give him to some else. I can only hope he had a better life after that, but I still feel lots of regret over that incident. I guess I should be careful of judging other people, huh?

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        1. I think a lot of it is having that experience, where we finally get it… or we don’t. When we began raising orphaned birds, I never thought about the time when they would need to take flight and be free. While they were little they were in a shoebox… sleeping, growing and eating. Suddenly, they were flying, landing on ceiling fans and not wanting to come down… flying all over to escape being captured and put in a cage (temporarily). The worst of it is birds are VERY messy. They leave droppings EVERYWHERE! When we finally put in a small aviary, it solved two problems. 1) acclimating the bird to the outdoors, 2) giving them a little space to fly and practice landing. I try to think ahead with each species of animal we take in, remembering that a good quality of life is of the utmost importance. It’s one thing to be a livestock farmer putting animals on wheat pasture to graze… walk around with freedom, as opposed to never being outside of a facility or walking/laying down in shit and muck every living day. Most animals and birds raised for slaughter for a meat-eating nation, never get to roam or graze outside. And Kim, it is overwhelming to think about. I do what I can… it’s about making better choices. I always hope I learn or glean something from my past regrets.

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  6. Yes, this is a problem in Alabama. Many people don’t care for animals at all. Either they reproduce their animals to make money or they will dump them. Did you know Alabama has the weakest Cockfighting laws in the country. And I see online posts all the time suggesting that Alabama should give no rights to animals and we should legalize Cockfighting and Dog-fighting.

    My mom has a dog that was dumped by someone and she is the sweetest thing ever! Someone dumped another dog and he was going to get hit by a car if nothing was done. So I rescued the dog and took it to the animal shelter. You will like the photos and the video! http://geekalabama.com/2013/01/16/rescuing-a-dog-in-ragland-alabama/

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    1. Thank you so much Nathan, for the link! I was just abhorred when I moved to Oklahoma and discovered the rampant cock fighting, and lack of law about it. Any living thing demands a right to live!

      I am thankful that people like you and your mom exist… showing love, caring and empathy to those who need it most!

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  7. This is why I love you so, Lori! You have such a good heart. Except for Tucker all of our pets have been mutts and rescues. The people who throw away life learned it from their parents. I am certain of it. In California, I had a student come in and tell me about her mother throwing a puppy over the fence and into the field. Shocked, I asked her, “Why?” The answer? “We don’t want it.”
    This of course prompted a conversation between us about how wrong it was to do that to a defenseless puppy! (As a teacher, that was “None of my business” and could have gotten me in big trouble, but I didn’t care.)

    I don’t think I made a dent. 😐
    But I tried.

    Conversely, *I once asked a neighbor to put a kitten into a burlap bag and drop it out front by the big elm tree… I watched for hours waiting for them to deliver. I had nearly given up, when I saw them stop and place the bag where I could find it. It backfired on me though. The cat and my Father got along famously and it wouldn’t have ANYTHING to do with me. 😉

    *(My parents had told me on no uncertain terms that I could not get a cat!)

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    1. Being a highly sensitive person, I think I tend to carry the pain and hurt of animals (as well as with humans), which sometimes overwhelms me… the problem is so huge! I often speak out about negligence and abuse to animals, and then find myself even more discouraged when I realize, as you say, “I don’t think I made a dent”. I’m preaching to the choir here, as most of my blog friends are animal lovers… but somehow, some way, perhaps we make a small difference. Maybe some day that student you spoke with will remember what you said. Maybe at some point in her life she will reflect on your words and it will hit home. There is always hope! Thanks Lynda!

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  8. Hard to hit a like button on that one, but it needs to be done, to recognize your hard work and literary skills. Living in the country we see it all the time, we were headed into town yesterday and we spotted a dog, lost as a goose and my heart sank when the wife said …. “There’s another one.”

    Pretty sad, pretty sad indeed.

    Don

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    1. Good morning Don… thank you so much. I’ve always felt that somehow animals know to come here for help… both domestic and wild. It is hard work, but something I do in love. There is a lot of my past that dictates why I care about animals (dogs especially) so much. While some of that is difficult to sort out in my mind, I am thankful for the animals that gave of themselves, their lives in some cases, to gift me with knowledge. Their lives were not lived in vain.

      The rain has finally arrived! My little dog Zoe is a quivering mass on my lap. She’s scared to death of storms. I see lightening off in your direction. I hope you’re getting a deluge. We’ve gotten a good bit of moisture this morning!

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    1. Thank you so much! Although I seem to be preaching to the choir on this blog… most of my reader’s are passionate animal lovers! And that, my friend, is an awesome thing! Thanks for commenting!

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  9. Excellent post! It’s great that you are brining awareness to this issue. I rescued a puppy this time last year, Little Lady Luna, and will continue to rescue dogs providing I have the time, space, and finances required. That is something I have been giving a lot of thought lately, incorporating some sort of animal sanctuary when I get my farm up and running.

    Have you watched the documentary ‘Earthlings’ narrated by Joaquin Phoenix? It is a very powerful and informative documentary about how our society treats animals. Not the easiest thing to watch, make sure you have a box of tissues. A must see for animal lovers or anyone looking to make a difference.

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    1. Oh, dear!! I am sure I will have to take in this documentary, and will do so when I’m feeling a bit tougher. I am such a gentle soul that sometimes the harsh realities of life toss me to and fro, leaving me feeling a bit beaten and hopeless. Thank you for doing your part in adopting Little Lady Luna, and for considering such a huge endeavor as building an animal sanctuary. Even on a small basis, it is very rewarding. You will never regret such a decisiion, my friend. I have enjoyed fostering, adopting, and raising orphaned wildlife and rehabilitating the injured. My life is richer and blessed because of my connection with nature. Thank you so much for your wonderful comment!

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  10. My geriatric cat, Lucy, showed up at our door a couple of years ago and I thought the same – how could anyone abandon this sweet girl? However, she was so obviously a former inside cat, I now have myself convinced that she was not abandoned. Perhaps her owner died – perhaps she ran away from a car accident scared to death. In other words, we cannot assume that these wanderers are all dumped animals. Some probably have a story to tell if they could only talk. Lucy is really more like a dog in that she wants a LOT of attention; if I am on the couch, she is on the couch – if I walk to the kitchen, she does too. The 7 year old Mike is typical cat in that he does what he wants to do. The only exception is I force him to stay in if it is cold (below 40 is the rule) and he seems to do well with that.

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    1. You are correct, not all animals are dumped or abandoned. Cats are wanderers, and it’s always wonderful when someone takes a stray in and gives it a new home. Sometimes what happens with animals and pets is simply unfortunate… but usually, somewhere down the line there is a negligence or lack of concern. Oh, I would love for animals to be able to communicate! It would certainly lead to better understanding… and it would be a voice heard! Thanks for your view, Louis! I’m terrible about saying “always” and “never”… and truly, that is not usually the case!!

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    1. Well, I’m not sure what’s happened. I have you approved to comment, so I’m not sure why I had to “approve” your comments again? Very strange. I haven’t changed any parameters on this end. Have you changed anything with your email or profile lately? I’m not very techy so I have no idea why I had to go back in and approve your comments. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

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  11. Excellent post. People think someone in a city will adopt their pet – and in the country the animals can survive on their own.
    People were always dumping dogs off at my dad’s farm. Those little animals can’t fend for themselves -hunt and find water – if lucky they find their way to someone’s door – many get hit running to greet a car that they are sure is there to take them back home. Sometimes they fall into abandoned wells. He kept a few, but most were taking to a shelter so maybe there would be a chance for a family – at least not fear and pain.
    We had to do the same in the neighborhood as people lost their houses and just left. Just heart breaking to see those little confused faces.
    And then there was the school guinea pig that live in a too small glass cage that was filthy. Quality of life? The poor thing eventually was so matted and smelled no one would get near it. It was gladly handed over and spent years in an atrium with a rabbit as company – they dug tunnels and lived together happliy (they stuck together and fended off hawks with their fierce stances and growls…the rabbit actually barked, odd but true…another tale.
    You do what you can. We are responsible for the small, the weak and those humans have domesticated.

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    1. Lovely comment, and so very true. Sometimes it is difficult to hear the words, and to speak them, but it is a reality. I love the stories with happy endings, the ones like the guinea pig and rabbit! If it weren’t for the good stories that warm our hearts, I’m not sure how I could survive. It is a cruel world sometimes.

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  12. It took me a couple of days to get up the nerve to read this post. Abandoned animals absolutely break my heart. I tried to volunteer at our Rescue League, but after one day was too sad to go back. The cats I’ve lived with have always come from shelters, and I will find my companions there as long as I live.

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    1. I completely understand, Sandy. I’m not sure I could work in a shelter and I applaud those who are strong enough to. Fostering dogs was good for me, but I was just flabbergasted at some of the horror stories. I don’t understand people who continue to purchase pets from pet stores and puppy millers. It’s a sad situation to be sure. I am happy that many of us are choosing to adopt from shelters and rescues. Those animals need our love and support. I think I’ve gone overboard though, mine are spoiled rotten!!

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  13. There’s so much I have running through my brain as I read this, and if I start, I might not stop. Suffice it to say you and FD are beautiful souls, and I’m proud to count you among my friends in this often cruel world, Lori.

    And! Thanks for the photos of your pooches!

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    1. Oh, thank you Sid! Your sentiments are mutual! I think most readers here are passionate about this subject. We are all loving and caring with our pets, and we’re ferocious about humane treatment of animals. This world often seems cruel. I always hope that if we do our best to create something better, perhaps it WILL make a difference.

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  14. Lori, I can understand the pain and anger of having to deal with animals which have been dumped or wandered away from home.

    Dumping is a deliberate, cruel act and an act of betrayal against animals which depend on humans for their care and wellbeing.

    Of course, animals wandering away from home can be the result of a mishap and it is a joy to be re-united with the missing pet. I remember one of my parents’ dogs escaping from their yard during a thunderstorm and being eventually found on my doorstep some kilometres away the next day. Relief all round!

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    1. Thank you Margaret, and that second paragraph stated my thoughts very effectively.

      We see plenty of “wanderers” on our property, and most of the time they’re easy to deal with. If we know who they belong to or they have tags, we try to help. Most however, don’t have tags and they run from us. I would be very upset if one of mine got away. I would be so thankful for someone to lend a loving hand in that case!

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  15. YES! I completely agree!! Awareness is such a big thing!
    Somehow the idea of “animal suffering just happens” crept into people’s heads. But the internet opened my eyes! It doesn’t “just happen”! We as dominators of this planet have SUCH a giant hand in it, if not THE entire hand!
    I love this story, and what a warm feeling it must’ve been when you saw the fluffs show up on the front page.

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    1. Yes, it made me feel so much better to see them on the front page. I’d been worried sick about them… I’m so happy they got great exposure, and hopefully they all got awesome homes! The caption sounded like our animal control officer is a good guy. They had him in the picture with one of the dogs. He looked like he really cared.

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  16. A couple of the marinas where I work have high populations of feral cats. They’re well fed, which is nice, and some of them tame down nicely. But in addition, several people have taken on the responsibility of capturing the cats, and then taking them to a veterinarian who donates spays and neuters. Each cat who comes to him gets an ear notched in a particular way, so that anyone who sees one knows it already has been taken care of. One result has been a slow but noticeable drop in the number of roaming cats – which is, of course, good for the birds living in the area, too!

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    1. That is an awesome idea! I know a lot of people around here feed the feral cats, but no one has seen about trying to capture them to be spayed and neutered. I may check with the vets in the area to see if anyone might donate services. Thanks so much for sharing this!

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  17. I agree with a commenter above: “Dumping is a deliberate, cruel act and an act of betrayal against animals which depend on humans for their care and wellbeing. “.

    Having said that, I can understand it. A house in the country is what, in our imaginations, heaven looks like for dogs and cats. But it’s really cruel to dump an animal. What you’re really doing is foisting your responsibility onto a perfect stranger — and if it doesn’t work out, well, you won’t be there to know about it.

    This is a really good post, and carefully written. Thanks.

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    1. Well thank you! You know the good thing in all of this was the animal control officer. I understood from the newspaper that he was compassionate and hoped some people would come forth and adopt these sweet dogs. Just spending a little time with them, I could not understand understand someone discarding them. Thank you for commenting!

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    1. Thank you!! Oh my goodness, Jayne, they were hilarious – those two old beagles! You could just see they were in their element, noses to the ground, on some kind of mission. FD and I just laughed as he led them out the front gate. They both had “wisdom faces”, white with age. But were they ever on a track of some kind! Isn’t it wonderful to see animals in their element?

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  18. It’s so sad when a life is thrown at you and you have no other choice but to give it to someone else. Sometimes I think this issue will never be resolved, but I have hope that education will fight it.

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    1. I agree and I think the more people are informed, hopefully, they will begin to make important choices to change the overpopulation of animals. There are simple steps to achieve this… if only each of us will do our part! Thank you for commenting on this important issue.

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  19. It’s a sad sad disgrace to see such terrific websites with real useful content so far back in the search engine results. What’s
    google’s deal lately? Sites such as this one ought to be at the very top…. not Five pages back. It is total rubbish!

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    1. Oh, thank you so much! I’m not sure how they decide the order of websites on search engines. I guess word of mouth is always still our best bet to spread the word about important issues. I appreciate your vote of confidence in my blog. Thank you for such a lovely compliment!

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  20. Hi Sundog,
    This definitely is a real problem. I’m sure that you have heard of the football player Michael Vick; the one that was training Pit Bulls to fight? His former home is about 20 miles east of me and has been turned into a shelter for abused dogs. Everything seemed great until the owner was found to not be using the money she brought in for the animals but for herself. She has been involved with several court cases and somehow always gets out of trouble. Her bookeeping is a mess and the outbuildings still have the blackened windows and such. I don’t think that I would trust her and it’s a real shame. I am willing to bet the shelter will not last very long!

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  21. I just found your blog and of course, was drawn to the one post that would make me cry. My animals are all rescues. I don’t live in the country but people always seem to know who will take in strays. It’s a sad commentary on society that animals are treated like garbage. It gives me hope, though, when I read about people like you and the animal control officer that took the time to give three homeless pups a chance at finding a forever home. Thanks for your post!

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    1. Thank you so much… and welcome to my little corner of the world. So many things in a day touch our lives. The day I wrote about these pups was indeed a discouraging one. Often we tend to roll along, knowing the tragedies in the world, but never really doing anything about it until we are faced with a problem. I eventually learned that all 3 dogs were taken in after the article in the newspaper. That made me happy. But, the fact remains that many do not find homes or at the very least, meet with people who care. I just keep thinking if we all do our part, however small it is, it can still have bearing and make a difference. That’s really the crux of my blog (most of the time). It’s about being cognizant and aware of creating something better for our planet and all living things!

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      1. I believe it’s important to keep going. Don’t give up, even when at time it seems that people are determined to be ignorant and cruel. I take in stray cats, get them fixed and work to find them homes. One person, ignoring an offer to pay for her pet’s spay procedure, can undo all my work when that cat becomes pregnant. I just pray that those kittens won’t become discarded down some distant country lane. Your posts educate as we’ll as entertain and inform. Thanks for what you do.

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        1. Thank you so much! What you do for cats is just as important! I admire you for caring about discarded cats and kittens, attempting to find them homes. It’s not easy to find homes, and it’s often expensive to neuter and feed these strays, but you’re giving them a second chance at life! Bravo to you… and all people who do their part!

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