Return To The Mist

I did not give much thought this past week about my plans for the week ahead.  A cool front had moved through last Thursday, offering a reprieve from the unseasonably warm weather we had been having and a chance for rain.  A ten-day forecast cited temperatures would not drop enough to end the miserable battle with mosquitoes and buffalo gnats though. That meant I would work primarily in the house, only stepping outside to do deer chores.  I knew I had plenty of indoor tasks to choose from, since I tended to let housework and cleaning slide over the summer months. Rainy weather was always a good time to do some baking and cozy up the house. Perhaps I would manage to create some rustic interior decor with a few of the woodland and river bottom treasures I had acquired on recent hikes. It would not matter what I decided to do. This was the time of  year I could relax a little more and indulge in whatever pleased me for the moment.

I love the feathery look of this dandelion cloaked in mist.
I love the feathery look of this dandelion cloaked in mist.
I had observed Miss Garden Orb all through September and October.
I had observed Miss Garden Orb all through September and October.
On Monday morning I found Miss Garden Orb hanging lifeless in her bedraggled web. Perhaps the rain and the first cold night took her life.
On Monday morning I found Miss Garden Orb hanging lifeless in her bedraggled web. Perhaps the rain and the first cold night took her life.

We were quite fortunate to have nearly an inch of rain fall since the weekend, leaving the landscape drenched in nourishment. It was a beautiful and calm atmosphere, and despite my plans to work inside, I couldn’t resist sneaking outside in the damp and chill.  Each day I escaped just long enough to fetch eats for the deer, and have a quick drive through the orchard in the electric buggy.  And while I generally did not take my camera with me on rainy days, I wished I had on Saturday when I spotted a large buck in a clearing not far from me. I had stopped the buggy to cross the electric fence, and felt the presence of something. There he was, observing me, triangulating his head. We stared at each other, and then ever so quietly he disappeared over a hill.  It was good to know deer were returning to the area, and perhaps the rut (mating season for deer) had begun.

So Sunday morning I had my camera with me when I spotted the familiar, large male coyote at the old river dike. I had not seen him in a while, but apparently he was still interested in something in the area. He took off running as soon as he saw me emerge from the line of pecan trees. I snapped a few photos as he ran off. I hoped that my daily presence would keep the coyotes from frequenting the orchard. It was my hope that Emma and Ronnie deer would have the best possible chance at survival when we released them in January.

Rain and moisture brings out the real beauty of lichen on tree bark. This is hackberry tree bark.
Rain and moisture brings out the real beauty of lichen on Hackberry tree bark.
I was able to photograph this chandelier-looking web for the last week or so. Sadly, on Monday it was gone. The downpour of heavy rain on Sunday may have done it in.
I was able to photograph this chandelier-looking web for the last week or so. Sadly, on Monday it was gone. The downpour of heavy rain on Sunday may have done it in.
In Autumn these (what I call) basket webs can be found everywhere in the woodlands. The mist really shows off their workmanship!
In Autumn these (what I call) basket webs can be found everywhere in the woodlands. The mist really shows off the spider’s workmanship!
This is the male coyote I have photographed before. I'm just sure he's waiting for one of the pecan orchard cow's to calve so it can snag dinner.
This is the male coyote I have photographed before. I’m just sure he’s waiting for one of the pecan orchard cows to calve so it can snag dinner.

Coyote_7691

Monday and Tuesday were quiet and wet in the woodlands. Nearly an inch of rain had fallen on Sunday, leaving the bottom land in the pecan orchard quite soggy.  I saw nothing but a few birds  in the foggy mist as I did my usual check of property lines. It seemed as if nature was contented in the reprieve from the last weeks of heat and dry conditions.  Mist and fog blanketed the landscape. I imagined the mammals and birds were holed up from the damp and chill. They were resting, and perhaps enjoying the peace and tranquility of the woodlands.

This Cardinal looked striking in the morning gloom.
This Cardinal looked striking in the morning gloom.

 

And then Wednesday emerged. Nature presented sunshine and a gentle breeze. The landscape twinkled with shimmering dewdrops drying in the sun. Little spiders emerged from their homes and birds chirped happily while feeding on giant weed seeds on the west end of the orchard. A barred owl called from high up in a tree as I headed home from my trip to fetch deer browse. This is where I belonged – where I felt good. Just an hour earlier my heart had been broken and my spirit shattered. Vicious words of anger over the results of the presidential election were plastered on social media by someone I had called friend for several years. I found myself deeply hurt by the viciousness. Like a wild animal, I had fled to the woods. And despite the warmth of the sun and the sparkling landscape, I felt a longing to return to the mist of the days before.  Being enveloped in a thick blanket of comfort and quiet appealed to me. Being drenched in the cool of the gentle mist had temporarily soothed my soul. Finding my little niche in the woodlands to escape, and resting my injured spirit made perfect sense. I needed to be alone. I would come out in the sun when I was ready. But not today.

Ronnie and Emma deer flourish in the cooler temps. Ronnie loves the rain! I found him playing and stomping in a mud hole in the deer pen.
Ronnie and Emma deer flourish in the cooler temps. Ronnie loves the rain! I found him playing and stomping in a mud hole in the deer pen.

© 2016 Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…

 


33 thoughts on “Return To The Mist

  1. Oh my gosh, I really understand your urge to soothe your soul in nature right now. This election has angered a lot of people, and I too am watching friendships torn apart on social media. I know I have to face it all at some point, but not yet. For now, I’m thankful that you shared that peaceful video of your pecan orchard with us. I loved that. And the photo of the lichen was amazing too. Nature never disappoints….unlike some people. Love you.

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    1. Thank you, Kim. For highly sensitive people (HSP), events like this can take time to recover from. I am so happy to plug in to our little retreat just outside the back door, and soak up the calm and tranquility this place has to offer. And thank you for your friendship, Kim. I love you too! This is a perfect time to assure people they are loved, isn’t it? 🙂

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    1. I understand some species of pecan can be harvested in early October, while others it is more likely to be November into December. This was not a production year for us. We learned that pecan trees generally produce a bumper crop every 3 to 7 years, depending on many factors – but rain is the biggest issue. Last year was a big production year in our state. I need to write a post soon on what we learned at the Pecan 101 Workshop put on by the Noble Foundation (www.noble.org), about pecans. It was highly interesting!

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    1. Thank you, Paulette… dogs running around the trees – lovely vision! My two old boys don’t run much anymore, but we go outside every day for a little vitamin D! Everyone needs sunshine. 🙂

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  2. Like you, I chose to retreat to nature on Election Day. It’s hard to watch my fellow countrymen rip each other to shreds. We all have a responsibility to act respectfully toward one another and do what we can to add something good to the world.

    The way you do, Lori.

    Your photographs and dispatches from Day by Day the Farmgirl Way are touching, entertaining, and educational. And they’re the perfect reprieve from all the vitriol and irrationality that seems to have taken over the political landscape on both sides.

    I choose to believe that we can bring about good things with our writing–even if it’s just putting a smile on one person’s face or making them go “hmmm.” In a frame on my desk are the words of Anita Roddick, “If you think you’re too small to make a difference, then you haven’t been in bed with a mosquito.” 🙂

    Enjoy the mist, but don’t stay there too long. We’ll miss you!

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    1. My goodness, first you had me in tears (a good thing – I felt the love!) and then laughing about that mosquito quote! That’s hilarious and so true! Thank you, Monica for your kind words. This year has been difficult. I keep thinking at some point things will look brighter. I just need to move forth and know that the Universe provides exactly what I need.

      I’m sure your next post will have me laughing hysterically – another nail biting series!! 😀

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  3. Dear friend Lori,

    Wishing I were there.

    We will have our property in escrow soon and are encouraged that the new owners will be refurbishing the little house in the same way as the two previous owners by using wood from the land. We were certain that any new owner would just mow down that 175 year old farmhouse and start over. It has been a hard 3 years with all the political changes, medical bills and increased debts for us. Selling our land was our only way out. And yet, we have to be encouraged now that the election is OVER. We will be almost entirely debt free and perhaps better covered by insurance in the coming years… but who can say for sure?

    And although we are losing our land I can still visit with you here and be soothed and comforted in your news of the tranquility that nature provides.

    Facebook? It has been nasty in the extreme for months. I am saddened by the whining on the left and disappointed by the in your face on the right. Is all that really necessary? We need to come together, work together, and move forward for all our sake. In the meantime, I have taken a holiday from the FB till we all simmer down and move on. We have to move on.

    Hoping this was not too political for this venue.

    Love you,
    Lynda

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    1. Oh, I’ve thought back on my visit to your home many times. I hate that you are losing it all. And I think you and Bob have managed well despite all of the medical issues you’re had to contend with. We never know how life will be, but having a good attitude certainly makes a difference. You are a warrior, Lynda!
      I often think I am too sensitive for this world. This is not the first time I’ve been hurt deeply by people I trusted and loved… people I felt a real kinship with. Lynda, I’m tired. I’m overwhelmed. Escaping to that guest room of yours is mighty appealing right now. At least we’d recognize each other at the airport this time! 😀 I love you too…

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  4. What a great way to start my morning with a hike through your lovely woods. You got some spectacular shots.

    I am so sorry for the viciousness spewed by your friend…and thankful you could find respite in the peace of the woods.

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    1. Thank you, Mandeep. I think you winter would be the time of the year to visit. These mild temperatures, even for the southern US, are outstanding and pleasant. The real cold will be here before we know it!

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    1. We have wind today, Margaret… and probably for the next couple of days. As high as the winds will be I fear most of the leaves will blow away. I think this will be a year of little color. But as you say, the rain has a beauty and intrigue of its own. 🙂

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  5. I am sooooo late reading this, Lori. It has been a crazy week for me. What gorgeous photos you have taken. That shot of the lichen is beautiful, but so are the webs heavy with dewy droplets and the cardinal… etc. The sound of crickets and the trickling water in the video are so soothing. No wonder you go to the woods. Take care.

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    1. I know that little waterway isn’t particularly beautiful what with very plain leaves and fallen limbs and even junk further back (which is on our “to do” list to clean up), but the sound of the gently running water was soothing that morning. I let my eyes roam the quiet stillness of the big pecan trees and the gentle slope of the old river dike, and let the sound of the water wash away the inner turmoil of my spirit. I don’t always have the sound of the water. Some days it is birds tweeting and calling, whispering wind, or no sound at all in the fog. It really is a soul soothing place.

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  6. Sorry that I haven’t stopped by in awhile work and wedding preparations have really tied up my free time but visiting you has always been in the back of my mind because I love your readings! Your pictures are brilliant! I had to stop and chuckle when you said you took the electric buggy out haha! I hope Mrs. Garden Orb isn’t the spider you ran into not too long ago!! Even though they are harmless they sure look scary!!

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    1. I am not sure how you manage to blog with wedding preparations and the wedding so close! I read your last post just this morning… you’re hunting too!! What a woman! I totally admire your pluck!

      Ha ha!! You crack me up! That was not the same orb, and I do love the orbs. We generally have a dozen in various places here on the immediate ten acres and I watch them September through November. I have many stories to tell about them over the years. They’re quite fascinating to read about too. My favorite story is about an elderly lady who was selling her home in the country about ten miles from here. We were looking at properties at the time and she was very sentimental about things not changing with the house or property, with the new buyer. At the very last of the tour, she took us outside and there at the back porch were six garden orb webs weaved on or near the back porch! It was the first time I’d ever seen them up close and I was horrified (I still lived in town back then). She said whoever she sold the house to, would have to love the orbs as much as she did and NOT disturb them. At the time, I thought she was nuts! But now, I totally understand. I love to observe garden orbs, and I never disturb them unless it’s by accident!

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      1. It’s obvious you have a beautiful heart for life even if it looks terrifying! I envy this about you. However, I’m not sure I could handle 6 so close to my house..yikes!! But maybe if I become better educated I might appreciate them more so I think I will do some research!

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  7. Thanks so much for the video – it is just what I needed. This is the best time of year (Huckleberries – had almost forgotten the fun of those) That pecan orchard reminds me off the one on our neighbor’s farm. He retired from the railroad and his house sat high on a bluff above the tracks and you could sit on the porch and listen for the train. He knew a lot about trains. He didn’t allow hunting on his property either so between his and our farms there were lots of deer and wildlife. It was so sad that after he died the new owner – from a big city cut down all the orchard and cleared the lovely almost enchanted tiny dirt lane between our property. Said the trees blocked his view. So odd.
    I’ve hardly been on social media/blogs/tv news since a week before the election and now – it’s just too…hard to find words…too stupid, too vicious, too ugly – from normally the most sane bloggers on both sides. Just don’t need it. I just want to scream “Grow up and play nice.” But that would be rude, so I’ve just stayed away. May continue to do so. Weather is nice (dry, but front due in this afternoon – and even indoors there’s stuff to do that’s not cleaning -ugh )
    Love all your pictures – we’ve fog, but our spider webs are nothing like the masterpieces there!

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    1. I have heard horror stories about folks cutting down old, historic pecan orchards. GASP! At the Pecan 101 Workshop we learned that in Georgia and Alabama orchards were being sectioned to 5 and 10 acre lots going for tens of thousands of dollars per acre just for the “enchanted” look of the property. We also heard others cut the trees for pecan wood – people pay high dollars for milled hardwoods. Our trees are not lumber grade, they’re old and stately looking. We will probably never make decent money from the pecan crops either. But we bought it for wildlife. We wanted a sanctuary for the deer.
      I’m still very sad about what I’ve seen on social media. I also had a rather disheartening comment from a reader last week, who is no longer following. Just last night I deleted his comment and my reply. The longer I looked at it, the more sad and overwhelmed I became. He was upset about my “hatred and cruelty” for coyotes. I felt the same slap with my friend’s words on social media over the election. I’ve done a lot of thinking about what I’ve said in my blog and how we do things here with the deer. I was already concerned about continuing rehab work due to the neighbor’s dog noise and continual escapes. I also felt after that incident with the children, which left permanent disabilities for Emma – it might be time to hang it up. I cannot ask my in-laws to not entertain people or to live quietly. I cannot control my neighbor’s dogs nor any that venture on the property from the neighborhood. And after the accusation of being cruel and hateful, I feel I cannot even write about my life without someone finding fault. I am a very sensitive person. Perhaps the Universe is telling me something that I have refused to see.
      But the good thing is… I have started on my book. 🙂

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      1. Can’t please everybody, must please yourself. Only real sense. (Good to delete that one – hard to get it out of your head, though. A person with a totally different experience and background unwilling to admit there are other ways of looking at something. Intolerant and not accepting of diversity …but they never realize it – feel they somehow have to right to tell others how to live their lives and mandate thoughts despite experiences.
        In the post you talk about “feeling right” – when that happens you know the universe is sending you a message that you are in the right place, right time, doing the right thing/going the right direction Some never feel or notice – great awareness on your part. I am so excited you’ve started your book! (Just once in a while add a blog post picture, so we know you’re still there and on track….book takes priority though!) YEA YOU

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