A Bungee Cord Car, Two Little Boys, and Rain

After hearing a couple of claps of thunder this morning, I knew I had better get in gear to run a few errands around town. Being the good farm girl that I am, I like to get out and about town early in order to beat the heat, crowds at Walmart and, in this case, rain. At least I was hoping for a good rain shower this morning, and the radar showed small pockets of rain moving across western Oklahoma. This time of year, rain is a novelty in our area, and much desired.

I first knocked out a trip to Walmart for a few groceries. Ours is a slow-to-rise community where people don’t get out and about until late morning.  I have found that if I get to Walmart before 9:00, I pretty much have the place to myself and shopping is very pleasant. Being the hermit that I am, this is a real plus –  I often meander through the entire store without running into anyone but the employees. As I put my shopping bags in the trunk after checking out, I noticed the sky was getting mighty dark to the north and west. I needed to blaze home, put my groceries away and finish my errands!

My second stop was at the post office, where I could not believe my luck. I walked right up to the window and mailed my package without waiting in line. Usually the post office was crowded with people until about 10:30. On top of this, our post office had cut their hours sometime back, which was a real inconvenience at times, but I was  glad we at least still had a post office.

Back in the car, I headed down the main drag – a state highway that runs through town. As I drove along, I noticed two little boys who could not have been older than three or four years, walking along the highway with only t-shirts on that were way too big for them. I suspected they were adult-sized t-shirts. Neither boy had shoes on. I saw a lady down the block on her cell phone and decided she must be the mother or at least someone watching them.

Next, I made my stop at the pharmacy to pick up Bear’s medication. Again, I was the only customer in the building so my transaction was handled quickly. Heading back the way I came, I saw a police car in the distance. The police vehicle was parked on the side of the highway with its lights flashing, and an officer was exiting the vehicle. On the side of the road next to him, were those two little boys I had seen earlier. They looked scared, but the officer was quick to get on one knee, down to their level. I looked in the rear view mirror as I passed, and one of the boys was pointing back to the east, the direction they were walking from. I felt better as I made my way to the west, knowing that we had a good police force here. We had called on them recently a few times (Neighborhood Burglar) and they had been prompt, courteous, and helpful.

As I traveled another three blocks down the street, I saw a puff of smoke belch from a sad-looking vehicle pulling away from a traffic light just ahead of me. I wish I could have photographed the car… I have NEVER seen anything like it! Almost the entire rear end was held together with bungee cords! The trunk, the complete right rear panel, and rear passenger door had bungee cords strapped everywhere. I assumed the car had been in a wreck of some sort, as the entire back end was crumpled. On the back, the tag on the somehow-still-intact license plate bracket, indicated the car was from Montana. As I passed the vehicle wondering how on earth any of those cords could really hold a car together, I saw more bungee cords strapped across the hood, and the front fender itself was held up by yet more bungee cords. Some were stretched from the front of the car to hook to the front passenger window which was open (to allow a catch for the hooks, I imagine). Some cords were even hooked to other cords for extra length. I tried not to stare, but I just had to see the driver. Behind the wheel was an older, Native American man. Then it dawned on me that this time of year it is common to see folks from many Native American tribes throughout the US make the journey to our area for various cultural festivals, powwow’s, fairs, and other Native American celebrations. Surely this man had not driven this pieced-together car all of the way from Montana?

As I turned onto the street that leads to home, the rain began to fall. I knew we probably would not get much by the looks on the radar earlier, but the overcast skies would be a lovely reprieve from the heat inferno and winds we had endured lately. At least, Emma and Ronnie deer would get a break from the extreme temperatures for a little while. And as I came down the driveway, I could see Daisy and her little buck walking in the rain along the woodland edge, nibbling on elm leaves and cat brier.

My view from the front porch while the rain fell gently. Emma and Ronnie's pen has mesh shade now. My garden is at the distant right.
My view from the front porch while the rain fell gently. Emma and Ronnie’s pen has shade mesh strapped to the fence now. My garden is at the distant right.
The woodlands are beginning to show signs of heat stress... leaves curl and fall, and the grass and vegetation begin to dry and go dormant.
The woodlands are beginning to show signs of heat stress, as leaves curl and fall, and the grass and vegetation begin to dry and go dormant.

There are signs, every where we go, that remind us that life is good and beautiful. And there are people all around us who help us along our journey. There are amazing things to see, moments of laughter, and times of gentle nudging. And sometimes, we get to fly by the seat of our pants and just enjoy the moment. May we all proceed through the day with our eyes wide open, and enjoy everything along the path we walk.

Daisy and her little buck walk in the rain, nibbling along the way.
Daisy and her little buck walk in the rain, nibbling along the way.

© 2016 Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…


35 thoughts on “A Bungee Cord Car, Two Little Boys, and Rain

    1. The heat isn’t as bad this year as it has been some years in the past, but still by this time I am ready for cooler weather and fall rains. Generally our rains come in September and October. I would love to know the story behind that bungee cord car! As for the little boys, I was happy to see the officer treating them kindly. Hopefully, he helped them home and everything was alright there. Try and find a cool spot, my friend. I think you have it much worse than we do with the heat!! GASP… ours is more like 37C!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, indoors is always fine since everything is air conditioned, but it’s the outdoors that’s killing! Can’t stay indoors all the time, isn’t it? Anyway, another few weeks and the weather will begin to ease up😛

        Like

  1. I am a homebody, too Lori, and therefor try to get my town errands run early in the morning too. I would go earlier if the grocery shelves were fully stocked! I feel so sorry for those little boys. I have never seen a car like you described, but I did see a woman repairing her car with duct tape one day! I hope you got some decent rain. We had cloud cover yesterday and even that, as you say, is welcome relief. It is still technically winter here, but warming toward spring rapidly and my little seedlings appreciate the cloud cover at the moment. Enjoy your day.x

    Like

    1. Thank you, Ardys. It’s been a good day. We have had family visiting for the last three weeks. I’m a little sad to see them go, and then there is all of the “catch up” work that follows. But, there is also a good feeling about getting things back to a normal rhythm. It feels like the seasons are about to change again. This year, I am ready for the cool temps. I know the deer are ready – they LOVE the cold weather!

      We are so much the same… I am sure we will discover more similarities over time! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha! Once FD retires our sleep habits may change. I would like to know for once in my life, what my natural sleep pattern might be if I could do as I pleased! It has been a good year for the deer – plenty of greens and goodies to eat. We also have three clover patches for them to nibble at. Everything I plant here is wildlife friendly. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

        1. So many folks raise a stink when they find wildlife eating their plants. My thinking is, if they are here with us, why not make it friendly for all? Most of what I plant is native to the area, and much of it is edible for wildlife, or produces fruit and nuts which wildlife eat. Many flowing plants are not favored by the deer, but do attract hummingbirds, butterflies and various other insects. It’s beautiful, and having so much wildlife to observe is a real plus! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes you are right. There is beauty all around if we just look for it. It’s funny, I used “seat of my pants” in a blog post I wrote earlier but in a much more negative context. Thanks 😊you have reminded me today that the way we view our lives all depends on our point of view ❤

    Like

    1. I just read your post! Perspective is such a funny thing… how we view something depends on so many things. I have had plenty of rough patches and down days lately, but the day I wrote this post, I thought about how much I have to be thankful for. I wish you much happiness… keep your chin up!!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I could write a lot about the area I live in… but it wouldn’t change things. I am glad there are people out there who look after those who can’t look after themselves. And I am especially thankful for law enforcement who look beyond the rules and regulations, and offer kindness and compassion.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Lori, your description of the ‘Bungie car” has reminded me of a documentary called “Reel Injun”. It talks about the “…wild and inaccurate ways that Native Americans have been portrayed in the movie industry.” Anyway, in one part the mention of the “reservation car” is brought up. Seems like this fellow took his off the rez. I wonder how far he traveled in it? BTW, if you are interested, we found this on Netflix and really enjoyed it.

    I’m glad that the two little wanderers were found by the local authorities!
    Question: Where is Daisy’s orange collar?!?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I should have known you’d be so observant… an indication that I must get to a post about Daisy. She lost her collar more than a month ago, and we have chosen not to put one on her anymore. I feel good about this decision for a couple of reasons – which I also need to post about!!

      I have not seen that documentary but we will definitely watch it. It makes me angry about the movie industry… like much media coverage of anything, it’s done so that it makes money – not truths. Living in Native American land, I understand so much more than I ever did about the beauty of their ways and beliefs. I am disgusted at the way white man treated them, abolished their way of life, and lied about it in history. GAH!! Don’t get me started… I’m very passionate about this subject! 🙂 I’ll definitely be watching that film. Thanks for the suggestion!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thanks to Lynda for mentioning that movie, Reel Injun. I’ve added it to my Netflix queue too.

        And I want to hear about Daisy’s collar too. I’m guessing it was a difficult decision not to put another one on her….

        Like

        1. Kim, Lynda always has interesting suggestions… places to see, movies to watch, books to read, subjects to research. She’s a retired school teacher. She’s always encouraging!

          I will just make time to write in the next day or two. The collar decision is a big deal!

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Lori, What a lot I have had to catch up on with your recent posts. Summer has indeed been a busy and eventful time for you. I am amazed how tidy you and FD keep your property – the grass is so manicured. I was intrigued by the storm shelter – are there openings for ventilation?
    I am glad you took some time out from your busy workload for a little R&R. What’s the saying? ‘All work and no play makes Jill a dull girl?’ Best wishes to you.

    Like

    1. Hello Margaret! I seem to be working in spurts these days… which feels good. I’m miserable if I put off my writing too long. Thank you for the compliments about the ten acres. Grooming flower beds, gardens, and a yard is time consuming, but there are many rewards. I love that we draw wildlife to the area, and most of our plants are wildlife friendly. The storm shelter does have ventilation. It is large enough to house at least 6 to 8 people comfortably.

      I had a nephew from Nebraska here this past week and I took the whole week off to play! Occasionally, I find time to relax and enjoy myself. 😀

      Like

  5. You are rght. We all live in a reel time movie – weird stuff always happening, if you have time to notice.
    That bungy car sounds like some we used to see around the reservations when we traveled as kids. (You do know it wasn’t only the “white men” that treated Indians badly? Maybe the Buffalo Soldiers weren’t in your area much like in TX – pretty brutal. And the Mexicans. Seems like greed, ruthlessness, and bad behavior is pretty universal.)
    Was wondering about the lack of orange on Daisy..she’s really gone back to nature now.
    Stay cool if you can. We were scorching all July and early Aug. with the grass getting crispy. The past few days of rain have helped (and Molly can actually take walks if we time them right) but once the clouds go, roasting again.
    Heard anything about a cold cold winter?

    Like

    1. I haven’t heard anything about how winter will be. I do feel a change in the season though… always do this time of year. Our fall rains are always on time – Oklahoma State Fair time that is! The deer are losing their red summer coats and looking a bit patchy bald as the blue/gray winter hair begins to fill in. I’m ready for winter! Their change of coat has everything to do with the change of season/daylight – and not about the temperature.

      I’ll write about Daisy’s missing collar. It was an easy decision to make actually. We probably won’t leave one on Ronnie for long either. Too dangerous as he gets antlers as a yearling. Not sure about Emma. FD and I don’t always agree about the collar, his perspective is from a hunter’s point of view, mine from a mother’s view and simple instinct. We will probably keep one on her for a while after release. Sometimes I think we were just lucky all around with Daisy. Her collar has served her well.

      My heart bleeds for the Native American’s. I was ignorant when I moved here. I believed the lies in the history books I read in middle school and high school. I know better now. It makes me angry.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ill treatment of the Native Americans was such a horror – so much of what happened then continues to impact them today.
        It is a crime how facts are left out intentionally when teaching children. Different regions/states teach differently. It’s important as parent to read widely from primary sources and if possible to go to the places and talk to residents to get a balanced view.
        So much of the forced reservations, the broken promises and treaties was from greed and politics.
        Rampages by certain tribes/chiefs were used as excuses to hunt down all Indians – many of whom were living in peace with settlers.(as shown in old family journals and documents from early days before TX was TX.)
        Oddly there was a glorification and great respect of the uncivivlized man, the “noble savage”who was naturally good and not corrupted by “society” that was a theme in literature, art, and culture in the mid 1600-late 1700’s. Then something changed. Maybe why Europe looked down on Americas and their treatment of native peoples. (yet applauded Wild West Shows?)
        People are so odd.
        There are good and bad people in every group of every color of every country. There seems to be no end to the evil one group can inflict upon another.
        Broad generalizations and looking at the past not through their ancient eyes (frame of reference of the times), but through modern standards makes analysis/comprehension more complex.
        It was as it was. What will be is yet to be decided. Put aside the anger which is nonproductive and upsets your body chemistry. The People don’t want your anger…maybe your support in Congress from time to time…there are ways to support the tribes.
        We should try to look at all the history – good, bad, and ugly – in order for society do better. Right now it seems like we are taking more steps backwards than forwards, doesn’t it?

        Like

        1. That was very well said. I suppose because I tend to be on the super sensitive side, I find the evil in today’s world horrifying. And you are right of course, that anger serves no good purpose on the front of helping the situation. Thank you for a comment that truly hit the nail on the head!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Righteous indignation and anger about injustice keeps things in balance. The next step has to be towards postitive actions – or it’ll kill ya.
            You just hadn’t had that slap you up side of the head. In graduate school, another poverty stricken grad. student and I had a little company that built economical floor looms for weaving ( much cheaper than the fine elegant ones from Canada). Some one in the Federal Indian Affairs caught wind of us and surprisingly we were asked to go to an Indian reservation to exlore the idea of their making looms and then weaving blankets/items to sell for tribal income.
            It was the 70’s and the mistreatment of the First People was a real cause demanding action. We did our share of protests and trying to improve the world.
            The Native American women were very polite but reserved. The agent shrugged and just said that’s the way they are. But when she left the room, I ventured to ask, “Is this something you are even interested in? It seems to me that weaving blankets may not be a tradition with you.” And the words then spilled out. They hated the idea. This tribe wasn’t like the Navajo. The agent just kept pushing them that they could learn and make money with blankets and tourist tours. An insult.
            Of course they went silent when the agent came back in. My friend and I politely rejected the government’s proposal to help build loom and teach weaving. It was simply a case of well meaning people blundering in, making generalizations, making false assumptions – and creating more hard feelings and a mess. Since then I’ve tried to walk carefully and quietly and listen. So easy to misunderstand even with the best of intentions. So that’s my story – make sure it’s wanted and is what’s needed.
            Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears should never be forgotten or excused.
            You’re a good kid. Glad you didn’t get angry. One thing I do know is you can’t be involved in fixing everything – you’ll get pulled apart and be less effective. People, if they listen, seem to be drawn to how they best can contribute. Your rescue efforts are saving the Earth’s and Universe’s balance one small heart and soul at a time. Thank you for all you do. It matters.

            Like

          2. Your words about anger and injustice have hit me on a more personal level too. That’s a good thing. I’ve been letting some injustices and wrongdoing kill my spirit for a long time. Your words about moving to something positive gave me much to think about… thank you for that! 🙂 When I first moved here an elderly white man brought me books to read – truths about the Native Americans. I felt angry at the time that as a young person I’d been led astray by what had been taught in school, history classes mostly. This man that brought the books had a deep love and compassion for the First People. Maybe he saw my ignorance as a newcomer to this area. I have a friend here who is Native American, and I’ve learned a lot from her as well. Understanding about the past really opens our eyes. What a wonderful story you relayed to us… about how you came to have understanding back in the 70’s. All sorts of opportunities come our way to have that understanding. I’m glad you took that opportunity.

            As I get older, I have grown tired from taking on too much. I am discovering that I can’t keep taking from myself without giving back. I do what I do with wildlife for many reasons… but mostly, it’s because it matters to me. Wouldn’t it be a lovely world if we all mattered to each other?

            Liked by 1 person

          3. Textbooks have never been known for being factual – only important that they are sellable by companies – so give them what the popular opinion is at the time. An ugly secret general public doesn’t know. Used to be in that industry but had to walk away out of disgust.
            At a cousin’s funeral – he wanted to be brought back to TX – we had the usual hymns and Christian messages, then after that out came the eagle feathers, ceremonial smoke, and words to the Great Spirit. No conflict to anyone there.
            You have good friends. They recognized an old soul.No greater gift than sharing wisdom. Your last sentence should be on billboards.

            Like

  6. Thank you… I yearn for the world’s living to matter to each other, and for our earth to matter. I just don’t believe as humans, we’re evolved enough spiritually (not religion but inner spirit) to achieve this.

    Like

Comments are closed.