What Hillbillies Do In Winter!

I had to think long and hard about using the word Hillbilly in this post. Before ultimately deciding to go for it, I Googled the definition just to be sure. Folks, in some parts of the country, might consider the term insulting and derogatory but, at least to people in this area, reference to a hillbilly is mostly met with humor. In fact, many of the definitions I read were positive;”those who enjoy the simple pleasures of life, live in sparsely populated areas or in the country, do not care what city folks think about them, spend time outdoors – either in the woods or on the water, are laid back, independent and self-reliant”. I decided these descriptions and words perfectly describe life here on the ten-acre ranch. These descriptions also seemed to fit the experience we gave a couple of young guests we had over the week that falls between Christmas and the New Year.

A few months back, my sister Jules, and her husband Chris, planned a trip to south Texas to celebrate their 20th wedding anniversary. Their plans included dropping off their children, 16 year-old Emily and 15 year-old Sid, at our ranch for the week. Em and Sid had been here a few times before, so they were super excited about spending a week with us. But the night before they were to drive down from Nebraska, the weather turned bad. The roads were snow-packed in their area, while partial snow and ice blanketed Kansas, and of course Oklahoma suffered a nasty ice storm. Being the tough northerners that they are, Jules and Chris set out anyway and soon discovered Nebraska and Kansas roads were mostly clear, while Oklahoma gave them only a few “closed roads” due to downed power lines. For the most part, they made good time, and arrived at our home around midnight. After a short night of rest and quick goodbyes in the morning, Chris and Jules set off for their second honeymoon adventure.

FD had to work that week, but indicated he had taken off New Year’s Eve’s Day. I was happy to hear this, as it would be our 15th wedding anniversary and we had dinner plans for the evening. How romantic of him to take the whole day off! Well, that thought was quickly snuffed out when he announced he and Sid would be watching the Orange Bowl football game at 3:00, cheering on the Oklahoma Sooner’s in their battle against Clemson. I guess I should thank my lucky stars that the game ended around 7:00 and our dinner reservations at the local winery were at 7:30. Just enough time for FD to change clothes and get us to our destination.

The weather at home was cold, but not nearly as the bitter and blustery weather the kids left behind in Nebraska. Since we had a layer of ice,  topped with a layer of snow, conditions were perfect for a sport we call, “Hillbilly Skiing”. We have a fairly steep slope out back of the house, and years ago FD fashioned a sled out of a pair of his Uncle’s antique, trick water ski’s joined together by a piece of wood (for sitting on) and a handle for, well, hanging on to – mostly for dear life.

This technique is the easiest - sit and hang on!
This technique is the easiest – sit and hang on!
Em tries head first - I have never done this!
Em tries head first – I have never done this!
Going down head first requires a "bail and roll" technique to avoid hitting trees at the bottom!
Going down head first requires a “bail and roll” technique to avoid hitting trees at the bottom!
Skiing double did not work so well as Emily was ejected from her perch about halfway down the slope!
Skiing double did not work very well, as Emily was ejected from her perch about halfway down the slope!
Sid The Daring!
Sid The Daring!
Climbing up that hill gets mighty tough after a few skis down the slope!
Climbing up that hill gets mighty tough after a few skis down the slope!

After quite a few trips skiing down and then climbing back up the slope, I thought of something new. There are about four acres of pasture and yard just south of the house, which gave me the idea to try pulling the sled around behind the Bad Boy buggy. We would each have turns driving and being pulled. And so it was that Hillbilly Buggy Sledding was born that day!

Pulling Emily
Emily gets the inaugural run!
I fell off the sled on my first turn, but I think Sid was trying to throw his auntie off! It worked and I took a roll. But I was ready to get back on! This was way more fun than skiing down the slope!
I fell off the sled on my first turn, but I think Sid was trying to throw his auntie off on purpose! His plan worked, and I took a roll. But I was ready to get back on! This was way more fun than skiing down the slope!
Look at the expressions on Sid and Em's faces... I'm certain they were trying to get me to bail!
Look at the expressions on Sid and Em’s faces… I’m certain they were trying to get me to bail!
Each time we rounded the pasture, the path got a little harder to maneuver on. Like water skiing and crossing a wake, the snow sled bounced and bogged over previous tire tracks. Sid got the bumpiest ride of all!!
Each time we rounded the pasture, the path got a little harder to maneuver. Like water skiing and crossing a wake, the snow sled bounced and bogged over previous tire tracks. Sid got the bumpiest ride of all!!

I had also promised Em and Sid we would hike to the river the next day, just as the three of us had done when they came to visit over the New Year holiday last year. Again, it was a real hit with the kids, though the trek was more work than usual since we were plodding through crunchy ice.

Occasionally we had to stop and wait for Em to pull her socks back up. Apparently these were not good boot socks!
Occasionally we had to stop and wait for Em to pull her socks back up. Apparently, these were not good boot socks!
I do not think I have ever seen the river ice over as our temperatures never remain cold long enough for it to do so. But blanketed in snow, the river channel area is beautiful.
I do not think I have ever seen the river ice over as our temperatures never remain cold long enough for it to do so. But blanketed in snow, the area of the river channel is beautiful.
The kids were great trackers. We followed turkey tracks in the snow all morning and finally discovered a flock of them hiding in a thicket area. The kids attempted to head them off while I flushed them out. The turkeys took flight right in front of Em and Sid. It was pretty amazing!
The kids were great trackers. We followed turkey tracks in the snow all morning, and finally discovered a flock of them hiding in a thicket. The kids attempted to head them off while I flushed them out, but the turkeys took flight right in front of Em and Sid. It was pretty amazing!
What is it that guys have to stomp on ice and water?
Why is it that guys have to stomp on ice and water?
Sid and Em are content to listen to the flow of water as it rushes by.
Sid and Em are content to sit and listen to the flow of water as it rushes by.

The day of the OU/Clemson game, Em and I decided to go back to the pecan orchard and pick fallen pecans. Curious cows followed us around most of the afternoon. Many of these cows were pregnant and quite large. One in particular had an udder that looked about to burst. I told Em I believed this one would have her calf anytime. After an hour or so of searching and gathering, we managed to gather two full bags of pecans and headed home with big smiles on our faces. Sadly for the guys, however, the Sooners lost the bowl game.

Emily enjoyed tasting pecans from each tree. Many different variety of pecan can be found in the nearby orchard.
Emily enjoyed tasting pecans from each tree. Several different varieties of pecan can be found in the nearby orchard.
All sorts of birds and mammals enjoy pecans. Fortunately this flock of birds were headed north and west, and the cloud of them passed over us in a stream for more than three minutes. There was little noise, only the sound of wings... like a swish of breeze. Emily and I just watched in silence.
All sorts of birds and mammals enjoy pecans. Fortunately, this flock of birds were headed north and west, and the cloud of them passed over us in a stream for more than three minutes. There was little noise produced as they passed, only the sound of wings… like a swish of breeze. Emily and I just watched in silence.
This cow had an udder that looked as if it could burst. She was friendly and curious about Emily, but never let Em get too close.
This cow had an udder that looked as if it could burst. She was friendly and curious about Emily, but never let Em get too close.

On New Year’s Day, Em and I cooked and baked, while FD and Sid camped out in front of the TV watching football. In late afternoon, FD and Sid made a trip to the store for hot dogs and fixin’s for S’mores. Typical men, they forgot the hot dog buns, so we just used a loaf of bread. FD got the fire pit going down in the canyon, cut and whittled roasting sticks for everyone, and we all made a toast to the New Year with a mighty tasty dinner. We sat around the fire long into the night, talking about everything from politics to the calf Emily hoped to see born before they left. Sid pulled a hillbilly move by jumping over Em’s legs to get to the picnic table to fetch more marshmallows and, in the process, a big muddy glop of snow from Sid’s boot plopped right in the middle of Em’s S’more. The look on Em’s face when the icy goo hit her plate, resembled the “stink-eye” look I’ve seen her mother give out on a few unfortunate occasions. While Sid was apologetic, and FD was defending him, I’m afraid I was completely ate up with laughter!

FD made roasting sticks from tree branches, while Sid kept the fire stoked. It was a perfect night for roasting hot dogs and making smores!
FD made roasting sticks from tree branches, while Sid kept the fire stoked. It was a perfect night for roasting hot dogs and making S’mores!

The next day, we planned to hit the road to Norman early to check out the University of Oklahoma’s Campus Corner. FD wanted to get the kids some OU shirts and let them take in the campus area.  There are many clothing shops, restaurants, pubs, salons, and bookstores on Campus Corner. Emily found all sorts of clothing items to suit her liking, but Sid was a bit more particular about what he wanted. After our time on Campus Corner, we ventured on to Oklahoma City’s Bricktown, but Sid still had not located any appropriate OU clothing.  Finally, at 8:30 that evening at a sporting goods store, Sid managed to find some OU gear he was quite pleased with.

Emily works at Starbucks part-time so we had to stop at every Starbucks we happened to be near. This one was on the University campus.
Emily works at Starbucks part-time so we had to stop at every Starbucks we happened to be near. This one was on OU’s Campus Corner.
Emily had no trouble finding clothes!
Emily had no trouble finding clothes!
Sid was more interested in food, and the many football games being played on TV at Toby Keith's I Love This Bar and Grill.
Sid was more interested in food, and the many football games being played on TV at Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar and Grill, located in the Bricktown area of Oklahoma City.
"We're eating WHAT?" They're called "Calf Fries" in the south, but the kids were used to the northern term, "Rocky Mountain Oysters". They actually liked them!
“We’re eating WHAT?” They’re called “Calf Fries” in the south, but the kids are used to the Northern term, “Rocky Mountain Oysters”. They actually liked them!

On Sunday, we were all up bright and early. Jules and Chris were just a couple of hours away, and I wanted the kids to be halfway packed and ready when their parents arrived. I knew Jules and Chris would only have time for a short visit, as they wanted to make it back home to Nebraska by nightfall. But Emily had other plans. Before her parents arrived that morning, she wanted to walk to the pecan orchard to see if that cow had her calf yet. So, Em and Sid and I donned our heavy winter gear and headed the short distance to the pecan orchard. Of course the cows were all grazing well off to the north, so we had a lot of walking to do. Carrying my camera and zoom lens, I scanned the distance for the white cow with the big udder. But before I found her, I saw a little lump of white with black speckles, lying on the ground ahead.  Mama was nearby grazing.

Realizing our discovery, we took our time, slowly moving towards the pair. Thankfully, the mother wasn’t a first-timer and did not seem to mind our gentle approach, even when the little bull calf got up. He was wobbly and a little off-balance, but finally got his legs moving and ran to his mama. Not wanting to create alarm for the newborn calf, we all pretended to be like the cows, stopping, bending over to pick a few pecans, and slowly inching closer again. It took time, but the cows seemed just fine to have us as their companions that morning, and we managed to get fairly close to the baby, where we just sat there and marveled at the little fella – Just like any good hillbilly would do!

Bull Calf_4466
Mama stands nearby grazing while a sleepy calf hides behind a tree near some fallen limbs.
Bull Calf and Mama_4422
Now we can see he’s a little bull.
I think Emily could have sat with that bull calf all day long. Mama is behind the tree keeping an eye on us!
I think Emily could have sat with that bull calf all day long. Mama is behind the tree keeping an eye on us!

© 2016 Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…


53 thoughts on “What Hillbillies Do In Winter!

  1. The photos are just wonderful, and all of the snow play looks like fun. That’s no different than how we amused ourselves when I was a kid in Iowa. The calf was a special treat, for sure. As for hillbilly — that’s akin to redneck. While people in the PC circles are having hissie-fits about anyone using the term, the rednecks down here in Texas wear it with pride. If truly big trouble ever comes to this country, those city folk will be flocking to the hillbillies and rednecks, asking for their sweet rear ends to be taken care of. 🙂

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    1. Oh my goodness! You have that right about the rednecks and hillbillies for sure! I often think of the lyrics to the Hank Williams Jr. song, “Country Boys Can Survive”. It very much describes life here in the south. Thanks for that awesome comment… made my night! 🙂

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  2. Oh my gosh, sister, I’m still laughing at that picture of Em when she discovered she was eating “calf fries,” lol! Those pictures are all so good, and they perfectly depict the fun times the kids told us all about. They truly had the best time, and they’re wanting to plan another trip there already!! I’m sure you could tell Sid has some of that motocross blood in his veins, he’s definitely the daredevil of the two. You and FD are so good with them, so entertaining! I love that you got on the sled and let them pull YOU around, that was very adventurous Auntie L! And I really love the last photo where you see the mama cow giving Emily “the look,” no caption is necessary on that one! Wonderful post, sister!!

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    1. Ha ha! That photo of the mama cow watching from behind the tree was one of my favorites. I think I will have to do a post on “Leonard” the bull calf. I can often see him from the back porch now that the trees are bare and we can see way back into the pecan orchard. I see him running “amock” (as they say here) darting all over the place! Yes, we had a great time with Em and Sid. I’m already trying to line up fishin holes for Sid for the next trip!! And there was so much that Em and I never did get to… Let’s be hopeful there’ll be an opening this spring or summer for a trip. 🙂

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  3. I am not sure why anyone would be all that upset about being labeled a “hillbilly” these days. As you say, it’s got more good connotations than bad and we class ourselves as perfectly excellent examples of hillbilly albeit Aussies. I love that your niece and nephew had such a great time and managed to spend some quality time with you both. Your New Years Day plans sounded wonderful and I am looking forward, with great joy, to when our own winter returns. There are 50 bushfires burning in our little state and it is very smoky up here in the north. We have log cutting (for our winter firewood) that needs to be done but the air quality is unhealthy outside according to the weather department and unless you have to be outside, we are being advised to stay inside and away from the smoke. Hopefully this summer will go quickly as I am most certainly over it. Again, glad to see you had a great time with your family. The kids looked like they had a ball 🙂

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    1. Fran, I though of you and Steve so much while writing this post! I feel the kinship of love of land and a carefree yet productive life, when I read your blog. Hillbilly… hippie… it’s all good! We can survive on little and we enjoy this country life a lot! Yes, the kids enjoyed it immensely. It is a boon to photograph kids with big smiles, enjoying the simple things life has to offer. By the way, this is the Emily that flies helicopters, plays instruments, writes stories, cooks and bakes, is a forager and gatherer (loves to gather wild asparagus in Nebraska in the spring), and loves to garden. She’s decided sustainable living is of interest to her now. I believe she will accomplish that!! And Sid is excellent in archery (hasn’t had an opportunity to hunt wild hog here yet but we’ll get to that one day!), likes to be outdoors, and has fishing fever. Now if we could only get them out here to spend the summer with us! 🙂

      Ugh, being stuck indoors with all there is to do outdoors has got to be a real downer! Getting that wood cut is necessary! What month do you expect rain? Gads… it sounds like it’s “drier than a popcorn fart” (as they say out here!) in your neck of the woods. 😀

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      1. Imagine how much fun they would have in the summer! It’s sounding like we are stuck with this “El Nino” till 2017! We are going to change all of our regular veggie garden beds to water wicking beds to save water and get more out of them (at the end of the season) and we are going to clear out the jungle at the front of the property this autumn. When plum trees start drying out and carking it, it’s dry! Fingers crossed they are wrong and this autumn we get good rain. I plan on planting out my nut trees this autumn so I might think smart and make sure that I can water them efficiently and easily at the same time. Got to plan and think ahead when you live in the country but then you know that :). I can’t wait to read more about Emily and Sid. They are both lovely kids, like their Aunty 🙂

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  4. I’m from Tennessee and while I am not a hillbilly through and through I have my moments which I am happy to call by that name. Your photos are beautiful, as is the story. Those children were lucky to have that time with you. I would have been mesmerized by all of it at that age. Especially the little bull calf. Beautiful.

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    1. I did not know you were from Tennessee! Your comment had me thinking back to my own childhood – how lucky I was to grow up on a farm and have so many natural wonders around me. Even later, when we moved to a small farm town, us kids were found venturing out to the country on our bicycles, poking around, looking for adventure. Here I am at 54 years, still poking around in nature and enjoying every moment! I am happy that Emily and Sid found the same adventure that week… and they seemed to love every bit of it. 🙂

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  5. If you mention hillbillies here film lovers immediately think of Deliverance. I prefer the definition you found. You’ll have to enlighten me, what are
    “Calf Fries” or “Rocky Mountain Oysters” ? 🙂

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    1. I knew someone was going to ask that! Good question. I’m sure terms like “calf fries” and “Rocky Mountain Oysters” are used because not many would try them if they were advertised as fried testicles. I had my first calf fries when I was 16 years old. I did not know what they were when I was handed a small plate of them. They were lightly breaded and fried. I found them delicious! We do have venison fries on occasion and I simply saute’ them in butter. It is a very delicate meat and truly they are best simply prepared. Breading often takes away from the real experience. When I was growing up “The Beverly Hillbillies” TV series was quite popular. It was clean comedy, and despite the Clampett family’s simple backwoods ways, there was a lot of common sense logic and wisdom in the plot of the series.

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  6. Lori, it must be wonderful to have the *yung’ins about the place. I think I would have enjoyed this immensely! I love that little bull. He has to be the most beautifully marked specimen that I have ever seen. I look forward to hearing and seeing more of him in future posts.

    *yung’ins – my best approximation of my Grandma Beverly’s name for children. She was a coal miner’s daughter from Virginia. BTW, Grandpa Beverly was from the hills in east Kentucky about 15 miles outside of Harlan, KY. I think that qualifies them both for Hillbilly status. Hm… I was born in Wichita Falls, TX. Does that qualify me for redneck status, or do you have to live it to be it? 😉 Loved this post!

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    1. Lynda, you have me in stitches! You were born a redneck, but I think your real roots lie with your ancestors in the hills of Kentucky. No wonder you long to live on the Mountain Farmlet! I think you and Bob will make awesome hillbillies! 😀 We are very fortunate to entertain a lot of nieces and nephews here all throughout the year. You would certainly have been in your element – as a teacher. It is one of the things I enjoy about having kids here – I pass on what I have learned over the years about wildlife and nature. And yes, you can be sure I’ll be writing about the bull calf. Emily requested that I keep her informed about his progress. She named him “Leonard” after Leonard Nimoy. The black eye markings seem to say “Spock” to me too!! 🙂

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  7. These kids are always going to remember this visit. What fun. I can see it in your photos, read it in your words. Those two are blessed to have an aunt like you and an uncle like FD.

    I love that bull calf. Adorable. Almost as cute as the little pony on the amazon prime commercial.

    A belated happy 15th anniversary to you and FD!

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    1. Oh Audrey, I too LOVE that Amazon Prime commercial! The music and emotion just say it all, and what a compliment for you to say that about my photos and narration. 🙂 You’ll be hearing more on Leonard the bull (Emily named him after Leonard Nimoy). I really should write about our anniversary dinner – because of power outages in the area, it ended up being a bit “hillbilly” style!! 😀

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  8. I just love this story and the photos to illustrate. What a great week. That calf is adorable. No wonder Em and Sid love coming to visit you. Belated best wishes on your anniversary, too!

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  9. The photos were so enjoyable, Lori. Absolutely loved reading about the youngsters adventures with you and FD. Have to cut this short.

    PS: I’m so glad I live where there is a slim chance for snow or ice in the winter. 🙂

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    1. I am glad that you don’t have to deal with snow or ice either. It really makes things hard – I usually have to carry the dogs down the steps – can’t have anyone falling. And I really have to be careful. After the kids left, the very next day I was heading to the pecan orchard to check on the little calf, and I slipped on the ice on the slope and landed on my butt, sliding a few feet down. I hurt for a few days after that. You can’t be too careful on snow or ice!

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    1. Thank you! It’s a wonderful thing to instill nature and the gifts it has to offer to children. The most basic and simplistic things in life are the best, I think. 🙂

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  10. Nice post my friend!! I’m thinkin’ it’s a little bit Country, and a little bit Rock n Roll…
    A great memorable time, for all y’all. I live for Rocky Mountain Oysters by the way.

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    1. You described the week perfectly! I think you would have enjoyed the hillbilly sports and trek to the river – not to mention the great cooking and baking Em and I did! Oh and I see you know the Southern plural for a group of folks! 😀

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  11. Such a great series of photos, Lori. Clearly you and FD kept those kids well-entertained during their visit. What a fun auntie and uncle you are. How awesome that you got to see the little calf so soon after his birth. He’s adorable!

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    1. Hi Kim! You’ll be hearing more about the little bull calf. I promised Emily I would keep her informed on his progress. Yes, now that I know how much fun it is to pull the sled behind the buggy, I think FD and I may take advantage of that on snow days! It was fun!

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  12. Wonderful post, stories and pics! 🙂

    Being the descendent of those in eastern hill country, who have been accused or lauded (as case may be) of being hillbillies – AND my love of history – I came across an interesting article some years ago, that hypothesized the reason the Hatfield and McCoy feud (the media coverage and the resulting social change by public perspective, changed ‘hillbilly’ from a term full of great things to a derisive insult) were purely a conversion of a myriad of factors:

    Spike in industrial/city growths-
    A need for workers to fill the factories
    Depressed economics in rural communities, especially in the south, that were reeling from the devastation wrought by the Civil War

    …and, all together – it became ‘smart, marketing savvy’ to lure young folks to the cities from the rural communities – to provide workers for the factories, by pointing out, over and over again, how boring, unsophisticated, unintelligent, naive, cantankerous, the ‘hillbilly’ was – complete with cartoon renderings of the poor dumb hillbilly that just doesn’t know what’s good for him” – 🙂

    Funny, how that time in history still impacts us today – driving folks like you and me to ask
    “So…what’s your definition of hillbilly? is it good or an insult?” – 🙂

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    1. I have never looked into the history of the term. Thank you for providing the historical background. I am quite sure there was a time when it was a derogatory term. Mostly, from my perspective, it is a term for country folks who live simply. I remember watching the Beverly Hillbillies TV series when I was young, and loved the humor. But even as a young kid, that show made it evident that there was wisdom and common sense in the Clampett’s decisions and practices. Somehow, they always managed to outwit and stupefy those city folks! 🙂

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  13. What cool teenagers! And they seemed to kind of like each other–or at least not mind being together. I was flabbergasted.
    I never in my wildest dreams thought “hillbilly” could have positive connotations. When I saw that in your title, I thought you were feeling bad about yourself!

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    1. You made me laugh, Sandy! I think we all get in touch with that inner “hillbilly” from time to time. I admit, I wasn’t sure about using the term until I delved into a few online definitions. A lot of words in the English language catch bad connotations. We enjoy hillbilly life here. We entertain a lot of family all year long because it allows everyone to be “country” for a little while. And you are very observant, Em and Sid are very close. They’re just a year apart in age, and though they argue just like any siblings do, they have a connection and deep love for each other.

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        1. Ha ha! Actually, when I worked for the state, I used to have a set of hillbilly teeth that I wore just to see if anyone bothered to notice. Sometimes they didn’t. 😀

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  14. This post makes me so happy, Lori. For many reasons.
    First, Happy Anniversary!
    Second, I just love all the outdoor time you spend with Sid and Em. The photos show fun, silly, and joyful time outside! What a wonderful visit you all shared, and how very lucky they are to have such an awesome Aunt!
    They will cherish those memories!

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    1. Thanks Laurie! It was a fantastic week with the kids. It’s not often you find children who enjoy nature and want to spend time out in the cold. Some of the things I take for granted – pecan picking, and simply sitting by the river, were activities these two found to be a lot of fun.

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  15. Wow, Lori, what a whole lot of fun this post was! I think your niece and nephew are lucky to have such a great aunt. It sounds like you enjoyed the company of young people as well. They do remind us to shed some of the heavy responsibility for a while and just relax and laugh, don’t they? 🙂 By the definition you’ve shared of hillbilly, I think you could probably label me as one when I was living away from the city. I liked the simplicity and being away from crowds. I know that my kids are more independent beings because they’ve spent most of their youth in country areas. We called the calf “treats” bush oysters here too. No point in wasting them! 🙂 It’s funny how country people use their imagination (and desperation?) to alter traditional ideas such as skiing. Out where we lived, when then the table drains on the side of dirt roads were full of water, people would be pulled along by 4WD utes. Thanks for sharing your hillbilly activities. I loved having a good laugh! Oh yeah, FD is sooo romantic. 😉 I know a few men like that regarding sports games! 😀

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    1. It was a fun week, Jane. Imagination is something I grew up with… we made our own fun. These woods behind the house would have been so mystical to me as a child. It’s great that Em and Sid, being 15 and 16 years old, could still tap into being kids – silly and fearless while skiing and sledding and wandering the woods! I suppose that describes me too, or I wouldn’t have been out there! Ha ha! FD truly is a romantic, but this year that darned football game interfered. As it was, with the kids here and our three elderly dogs, we did not do our usual night out or weekend trip away for our anniversary. I really should have taken photos at the winery that night. They were without power so they had an old tractor out front, running the generator, which really wasn’t big enough to run the whole restaurant. It was chilly… and the chocolate dessert fountain froze up!! So they improvised with a hot dipping pot for the chocolate. That was good until put our dipped cookies, fruits, and cake squares on our plates and by the time we sat back down at our table for two, the chocolate had gotten hard (from the chilly room) and froze to the plate!! It was funny, and everyone just chopped away at their desserts! But really it was a delightful and wonderful night! 🙂

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  16. Hi Lori, I have enjoyed reading your recent winter posts. Whilst the stories are entertaining, I do not yearn for snow or ice. It seems Oklahoma is warm enough for snow and ice to be short lived so you are not living for months in deep snow and having to dig your way out of your home – erk! I hope you enjoy the rest of winter and will soon see the early signs of spring.

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    1. Margaret, you pinned it! We do not see much snow or ice and it never lasts very long. It’s more of a novelty than a problem. I have been seeing lots of robins lately, and they are usually the bird that welcomes spring! So I’m hopeful!

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  17. There’s something about a small hill that makes a house location perfect. I was so glad my parents lived long enough that my daughter got to play on the little hill at the back of their house. It’s flat, flat, flat here. We used cardboard boxes to slide in summer and tubs for ice. Your sled was kinda like the go-kart/wagon we pieced together with some ancient red wagon wheels and board with a rope to steer.
    The country offers so many simple pleasures – and the chance to make your own. So glad those two can visit and enjoy being on your farm. That’s one handsome little bull! (And how cool you are close enough to the univ area to shop and dine – they must have loved that, too!)
    Red necks here are often the hillbillies who came south? I remember that show. Silly, but even with all the slapstick, there was some really important observations and truths there.
    Elvis was hillbilly…country grows so many amazing things.
    Your posts always make me smile.

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    1. Ah, the memories!! When I was a kid we lived on flatland, but Dad piled snow as high as some of the garages and sheds, so we had man-made hills. We built forts and had snowball fights. And of course up north the snow is around all winter so we were always in it. Here it’s a novelty, and very much about celebrating. I find the pecan orchard area magical in many ways. I am thankful the neighbor who owns it, allows me to walk through there on the way to the river. Of course I keep an eye on things too. I’m very ferocious about the animals – both wild and domestic – that roam the area. Thanks for sharing some memories… and tapping into “country” for a while! 🙂

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  18. Lori that’s a whole lotta bull going on here. 🙂 Somehow I missed this post- suppose I was driving my son to some MD appointment. I’ve been awfully busy since his accident but he is healing extremely well.

    Anyhow, the cows are pretty and Leonard is one handsome bull calf with the unusual markings. I doubt he will be kept as a breeder/sire. Eventually he’ll die in a slaughter house and become rump roast. T-bones or round steak, etc. That pains me a lot for I refuse to eat beef.

    Keep in my mind that I don’t care what other folks eat. I am not attempting to convert anyone to stop eating beef/pork, lab, goat or what ever. I enjoyed the post. the scenery was great.

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    1. I know, Yvonne. Likely, that will be Leonard’s story. Fortunately, he will be allowed to graze in the country until his time comes. At least our pecan orchard neighbor is good to his livestock and the family are good, kind people. Right now, Leonard is enjoying being a youngster and his mama feeds him well. Already the herd of cattle have been moved to wheat pasture, so I won’t be able to check on him much unless they bring the cattle back to the pecan orchard area for the summer.

      I have been thinking of you and your son. I’m still sending positive vibes and prayer for a full and speedy recovery!

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      1. Thank you, Lori. My son is healing extremely well. Beyond his neuro surgeon’s expectations. He was and is blessed, I am sure. Lomg term memoryis excellent and shoet term is improving very well. Still needs speech and cognitive therapy but he isdoing well with that too. Balance and coordination are very good. His back is giving him the blues though. Doesn’t like wearing the brace. Lots of MD appointments to take him to. Keeps me pretty busy plus keeping up with bills and paper work. Thank you for the prayers and positive vibes. I know they help.

        Yvonne

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