New York City… Walking the NY Walk – The First Three Days

Naturally, I awoke that first morning in NYC wondering (worrying) about what was going on back home. After all, what kind of mother would I be if I did not check in with Sissy Jo throughout the week to check on our three little Japanese Chin and to find out how Daisy was managing with her new fawns? I also wanted to be sure Sissy was doing well and had everything she needed. I was surprised, and mostly relieved, to know that everyone was doing just fine. In fact, Daisy was eating cherry tomatoes from Jo’s hands, and the three chin were behaving exceptionally well. Even antisocial Mr. T seemed to have become lovey-dovey all of a sudden, vying to sit right next to Sissy just like Bear and Zoe were!

I was also relieved when, later that first day, Jules and her family arrived in NYC safely and on schedule too. Oh, they had a few humorous events during their travel from Omaha, Nebraska to Midtown NYC, but it would all make for great storytelling. It seemed, all of a sudden, that after the “worry” part of my journey was put behind me, I began to relax and get on with “my week”.  FD had been calling this trip my birthday week so, by golly, I was going with it!

The prestigious Dakota Aparments, well known as the home of former Beatle, John Lennon, and also the site of his murder. Security was tight there, but FD and I did manage to peep through big iron gates into the beautiful central courtyard. Exterior work was being done on many buildings in Manhattan (including the Dakota) during our visit.
The prestigious Dakota Apartments, well known as the home of former Beatle, John Lennon, and the site of his murder, was currently having some exterior work done. Security was tight there, but FD and I did manage to peep through big iron gates into the beautiful central courtyard. Exterior work was being done on many buildings in Manhattan during our visit.

Our morning activities usually began anywhere from 6:00 to 7:00 with all of us meeting on the first floor of the hotel, in the dining area. Jule’s family really enjoyed the buffet-style breakfasts but, for FD and me and our Paleo diet, the choices were fairly limited. Generally, the scrambled eggs and whatever meat was offered was the only heated items we could partake in. Thankfully, there was always fresh fruit offered on the buffet, and we took advantage of that each morning. Additionally, hotel staff provided a large bowl of apples in the lobby that they kept full all day long, so FD and would take a couple for a snack each day. Jule’s bunch enjoyed the fruit too, but also enjoyed the option of having fresh cookies that were available at the front desk for only a very short time each afternoon. For what ever reason, it seemed those cookies held more appeal for folks than the apples did, as the cookies were snatched up within a few minutes after they were put out!

By 8:30 we were all full with breakfast and ready to head out for the day’s adventure.  FD did most of the route planning. Frankly, I got lost just about every time I walked out the hotel door. I blamed this loss of my inner compass on all the skyscrapers that block any view of a horizon. I also lose my sense of direction in the mountains and in heavily forested areas. Most every time we set out as a group, FD was at the lead, and we all simply followed like a bunch of little ducklings waddling along behind their mother. If anyone became sidetracked with gawking at something, FD was a good shepherd, yelling out that person’s name and jolting them to attention to rejoin the pack. Our nephew Sid’s name was yelled many times that week. It seemed very easy for a 13 year-old, small-town boy from Nebraska to stray off course, take too long a gander at some cowgirls, or simply slow down the pace. Also, niece Emily was with us the first three days, as she did not have to join the Honors Performance group until late Wednesday afternoon. Emily was drawn to the stores and was always looking for souvenirs and gifts for friends back home. I am pretty sure FD called her name a time or two as well…

This is what I loved about being the photographer for my family! Some of the expressions are hilarious! Here they have just spotted the Naked Cowgirls!
This is what I loved about being the photographer for my family! Some of the expressions are hilarious! Here they have just spotted the Naked Cowgirls!
I guess theses two were giving the Naked Cowboy across the street a little competition. Our cowgirls in Oklahoma do not look like this!
I guess these two were giving the Naked Cowboy across the street a little competition. Our cowgirls in Oklahoma do not look like this!
This street performer posed for a lot of photos, and also signed autographs. Can you imagine painting your face green and wearing that getup all day, never speaking to anyone?
This street performer posed for a lot of photos, and signed autographs. Can you imagine painting your face and hands green, wearing that getup all day, never speaking to anyone?

The first day out, after Jule’s family arrived and we had a bite to eat at the House of Brews, conveniently located just around the corner from our hotel, we checked out Carnegie Hall where Emily would be performing on Saturday night. Then, walking a bit further to the east, we stopped by The Roosevelt Hotel, where Emily would spend Wednesday night through Sunday morning. By the look of things inside the Roosevelt’s lobby, it was obvious Emily would be living the fine life at a much fancier hotel than ours. Next, we moved on to Times Square, Grand Central Terminal, and finally stopped at John’s Pizzeria for dinner. The food at John’s was scrumptious! FD and I had the Chicken Marsala and it was the best I believe I have ever had! Jule’s family raved about their entrees as well.

It was getting dark by the time we finished our dinner, so we moseyed on over to the Empire State Building, hoping to catch the nighttime scenery when tourist numbers were low. As we hoped, our trip through security was fairly quick and we were soon enjoying the spectacular viewing of the city’s night lights from our perch atop the grand building. Emily was enthralled with all of the helicopter traffic high above us. I know she would have loved to have taken the HeliNY tour but, at $150 for a 13 to 15 minute flight, it was not in the budget. After spending about an hour taking photos and taking in the views from the observation deck, and another browsing the gift shop and making our way back down the various stairways and elevators of the Empire State Building, we decided to walk back to our hotel – which was quite a jaunt. I think all of us were a bit worried about taking the train (subway) at night.

Tuesday morning, we were up early. On our schedule for the day, was a trip to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. Fortunately, we had followed advice to purchase tickets on Statue Cruises in advance and have printed receipts so we could assure passage on the ferry at a specific time. To get to Battery Park where we would board the ferry, we would need to ride the train from a stop near our hotel. This was our first time riding the NYC subway system, and Sid soon discovered he loved people watching on the train. I liked the speed and timely manner of travel. It’s amazing to think a system that has been in operation for 110 years is still regarded as one of the most efficient mass transit systems in North America. And though many of the MTA ticketing agents were not very informative or friendly, usually a local person was willing to help with directions and route information. Properly swiping MetroCards at the turnstiles also took a bit of a knack, which was frustrating. However, seeing many other tourists struggle with those flimsy cards made us feel a bit more at ease about our own ineptness.

Arriving at Battery park, we followed the shouts of instructions from the cruise people directing tourists where to go and what lines to form to get to the ferry station. I was sure glad we had purchased tickets beforehand, as we were able to bypass the very long lines at the ticket station. Once on the ferry, we enjoyed a leisurely cruise to our first stop, the Statue of Liberty. Well, at least I thought it was leisurely. Jule’s told me later that Sid was not feeling very well the entire ride. Apparently Sid does not have sea legs!

Lady Liberty was stunning!
Lady Liberty was stunning!

Prior to our trip, I did not expect to be bowled over by Lady Liberty… but I was.  She was absolutely stunning! Her robes draped in perfection and she looked ever so confident and proud standing there on her platform. My, I thought, she even wore sandals! Who knew? She paid little attention to the oooh’s and aaah’s of the crowd below her, standing staunchly with that majestic crown atop her head, as if she had a job to do by gosh, and displayed a very impressive image holding the flaming torch that welcomed so many immigrants who arrived from abroad in our country’s early years.  I was a bit envious of the lucky people who were on her platform and a few who had made the climb into her crown. We discovered one had to make reservations about three months in advance to climb to the crown, and book at least  two weeks in advance for access to the platform. As we walked all around Lady Liberty, I had a new appreciation for this very gracious gift from the people of France and the artist, engineers, and sculptors who had created her. I thought of the work that went into hand hammering the folds of her robe and every little detail from the torch she held to the sandals on her feet… she was utterly magnificent.

Ellis Island as seen from the ferry.
Ellis Island as seen from the ferry.
Here is the wall that we all spent about an hour looking for Granpa's name before realizing it was the "donor" name listing! Did we ever feel silly!
Here is the wall at Ellis Island where we all spent about an hour looking for Grandpa’s name – before realizing it was a dedication to all the donors who had helped with the restoration efforts! Did we ever feel silly!

Back on the ferry after spending time with Lady Liberty, we were off to Ellis Island next. Upon arriving, we first grabbed a bite to eat at the cafe just outside the immigration station, which is now the museum. It was a pricey lunch and nothing to brag about, but it filled our bellies for the afternoon. Just outside the cafe’s seating area, we noticed a huge circular wall with names on both sides. So, for the next hour, we all intently searched for our Danish Grandfather’s name, but he was nowhere to be found. This was quite disappointing and perplexing until my bro-in-law, Chris, discovered, and laughingly exclaimed, that was the “donor” wall – people who had kept Ellis Island alive with renovations and improvements over the years since it closed down. Did we ever feel silly!

Not wanting to waste any more time, we headed inside to tour the museum. Jules and FD took off for the records department in search of more information on Grandpa while the rest of us checked out various rooms, where we learned about the history of Ellis Island. My favorite room was the photo gallery. Viewing the historic photos really put the experience of so many immigrants into perspective for me.  Jules and FD found Grandpa’s records, but also discovered a discrepancy between what they found and the information we understood from hearing relative’s stories over the years, and even from Grandpa himself. It ended up being a mystery… and not one we will ever be able to solve I’m afraid.

I believe Jules has a kind look about her... often people approached her asking if she would take a photo of them with their camera. Jules always obliged them and often chatted after.
I believe Jules has a kind look about her… often people approached her asking if she would take a photo of them with their camera. Jules always obliged them and often sparked up some friendly chatter afterwards.

By late afternoon, we had taken in all that Ellis Island had to offer and were ready to get back to the hotel and find a place to have supper. It had been a long day, and the trip back on the ferry to Manhattan seemed to drag on and on.  The ferry was crowded and hot, and I am sure for Sid the ride on the choppy water was an eternity. And unfortunately, the return trip on the train was more crowded since it was the beginning of rush hour. By the time we arrived back at our hotel, we were quite hungry and tired.

Jule’s bunch were interested in trying some New York hot dogs, and went their own way to find dinner, while FD and I opted to dine at a French restaurant just across the street from the House of Brews and around the corner from our hotel. Tout Va Bien proved to be some of the most delicious French cuisine we have ever tasted! We took a little walk after dinner, and stopped at nearby Xai Xai, a South African wine bar. Here, we finished the evening watching people walk by while sipping a lovely Cabernet at a sidewalk table.

Em and I stand at the statue of Balto the sled dog in Central Park.
Em and I stand at the statue of Balto the sled dog in Central Park.
This stone owl and bat were part of a pillar in Central Park.
This stone owl and bat were part of a pillar in Central Park.
This protest was getting very heated about the time we happened to walk by. Police were arriving from every direction, so we decided it was time to vamoose to a safer area of Central Park!
This protest was getting very heated about the time we happened to walk by. Police were arriving from every direction, so we decided it was time to vamoose to a safer area of Central Park!
FD and Chris take a moment to watch the model boats sailing on Conservatory Water in Central Park.
FD and Chris take a moment to watch the remote-controlled boats sailing on Conservatory Water in Central Park.

Wednesday was Em’s last day with us before she had to check in at the Roosevelt Hotel later that afternoon so we elected to let her decide where she wanted to go for the day, and she chose Central Park. I was a bit surprised at her decision, but then I probably should not have been. Emily has always been a bit like me in the sense that she loves animals and nature.  And, after a very taxing day on Tuesday, we were all ready for a more leisurely pace this day. Central Park sounded like it would provide for a slower pace but, by the end of the day, it had not been leisurely at all, as the day was hot and sweltering, with high humidity.

FD, our tour leader, initially guided us by observing signs and various diagrams posted along the way, but finally had to purchase a park map because the trails were so extensive – meandering and crisscrossing in every direction! A person could easily get lost wandering around this huge park without a map! But fortunately, Central Park was not terribly crowded, and the stroll along almost every trail we took was simply beautiful. There was stunning architecture and sculpture, lush lawns, and beautiful landscaping. For the most part, we spent the day walking and climbing, taking photographs, and stopping to simply observe the beauty surrounding us. I did a little bird watching as well, hoping to see signs of the famous Red-Tailed Hawks that nest on tall buildings just across from the park on 5th Avenue, but I did not see a hawk at all that day.

Once again Jules has been asked to take a photograph!
Once again Jules has been asked to take a photograph!

While maneuvering through the park, we occasionally sat on benches to rest a bit and take the opportunity to listen to the various street performers who hoped to make a few dollars playing their music. I guess because she seems so approachable and friendly, many of our stops in the park frequently included Jule’s being asked to take photographs of various tourists and visitors. At every turn in Central Park, there was something of interest or beauty. I could not imagine the work involved to keep such an expansive place groomed and manicured. I found myself feeling very much at home here.

Having finally put about six miles on our feet and getting very close to the upper end of the park, we opted to take the train back at 103rd Street on the Upper West Side.  As we stepped out of the almost magical beauty and seeming innocence of Central Park, things looked quite different (and somewhat unpleasant) just across the street at the MTA entrance where we would get on the train. The buildings were shabby and the streets held an eerie quiet to them. I tried to look confident as we walked to the MTA station, hoping I looked like one of the locals. But inside I felt fearful. My instinct was telling me we had gone too far north in our venture. Let me tell you, that train could not get back to our home base fast enough!

This group of musicians was a delight to watch and they were quite talented. Emily was able to approach the clarinet player and asked questions about jazz clarinet, which she had never heard before.
This group of musicians was a delight to watch and they were quite talented. Emily was able to approach the clarinet player and asked questions about jazz clarinet, which she had never heard before.

But then something happened on the train that completely made me forget the ill feeling in my gut. At the next stop, a flurry of pink suddenly bounded into the train. A rather gangly looking “lady” sighed as she tossed her hair and flopped into the seat just across and down from Sid. Her dress was a flimsy pink frock, and she carried a little purse. Settling into her seat a bit more, she crossed very long pale legs, with feet adorned by some strange, black Converse tennis shoes that had been spray painted with silver glitter. I was just thinking how odd those shoes looked with that flimsy pink dress when the “lady” turned her head towards us – and that is when I realized that she was a HE with quite a bit of beard and mustache stubble. Oh dear… and poor Sid could not wash the grin off of his face to save his own life! The gentleman across from Sid got tickled watching him watching the “lady” and, before long, several of us near this lady were struggling to compose ourselves. Interestingly, the “lady” seemed to enjoy the attention she/he was getting. And I was immediately thankful for this humorous diversion that kept me from fear and panic and made the trip back to the station near our hotel seem like it took no time at all. I smiled pleasantly at the lady in the pink dress as we exited the train, but she just looked down demurely, as if shy. As we were all walking back to the hotel, we realized FD had not noticed our “lady” at all! He had been sitting right next to Sid, but had missed the whole show, too busy wondering why the scruffy-looking man directly across from him kept smiling so strangely at Sid!

Back at the hotel, Emily grabbed her bags and we all walked the distance to the Roosevelt Hotel together to get her checked in to what would be her home for the next three days. In the registration area, we met Em’s chaperon and one of her four roommates. Then, we helped them both settle into their room, and said our goodbyes to Em. I thought about what an adventure this must be for Emily, and was not so sure that, at the age of fourteen, I would not be scared out of my mind. But, this would also be an exciting venture for Em, and I hoped that, as she looked back on the trip one day, it would be a bright diamond in her life’s experiences.

Checking Emily in at the Roosevelt Hotel and helping her get settled in her room - shared with four roommates.
Checking Emily in at the Roosevelt Hotel and helping her get settled in her room – shared with four roommates.

When we finally left Em at the Roosevelt, it was only becoming late afternoon and there was still plenty of daylight left to take in a bit more sightseeing. We headed to Bryant Park, which was small, but a beautiful gathering place for many. I was surprised to see both young and old quietly playing chess or checkers, while others laid on blankets, having a rest in the sun. After strolling through Bryant Park and on to Rockefeller Center and Madison Square Garden, we observed many fire engines making their way through traffic, even going the wrong way down a one way street in order to get to their emergency call. I thought about the chaos NYC service people must deal with on a daily basis.

Toward dark, we stopped for dinner at 5 Napkin Burger, where the noise was deafening. This famous burger joint was listed on a friend’s recommended places to eat, so we endured the noise and waited patiently for a table. As it turned out, the burgers were very good, and the service was excellent. But after finally taking a little time to sit, relax, and fill our bellies with good burgers and beer, that walk back to the hotel seemed like an eternity! Again, we did not take the subway. Instead, we walked back through Times Square, which was enormously crowded even at this time of night. It seemed that, no matter what time we traversed through Times Square, it was always quite noisy and congested with people. Now, I was truly beginning to understand why NYC  is known as “The City That Never Sleeps”!

Bryant Park was not far from our hotel, and it was a spot we would pass by many times as we walked the streets of Times Square.
Bryant Park was not far from our hotel, and was a spot we would pass by many times as we walked the streets of Times Square.

© 2014 Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…

Note: For those of you interested in my sister Jule’s documentation of the NYC trip, her blog is Groovy Love, Scrubs & Chimichangas.

 

 

 


42 thoughts on “New York City… Walking the NY Walk – The First Three Days

  1. Thank you for taking me along on this trip. I love it when someone describes their travel so well that I feel like I am there.

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  2. Another excellent post about NYC. I would have gotten lost as well. I am like you, I need to feel a place for a while before I can get my bearings but after that “I” am the one who never forgets :). Love that green man, he looks like Robin Williams. I also love those facial expressions. Your brother in law isn’t going to live that image down any day soon 😉

    You don’t realise the scope and sheer magnitude of Ms Liberty till you get to see those teeny tiny little specks of people all around the base of her. NOW I get how big she is. Cheers for that clarification 🙂 I am marveling more at the sea voyage that brought her to America in the first place. Can you IMAGINE the magnitude of loading her on and off back in the old days?!

    What a trip you had and how exciting. I would have been twitchy if I tumbled into a place that made me feel insecure as well Lori, you get a feel for these things and you felt it. Loving this series of shared NYC. Cheers for sharing with us all 🙂

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    1. Thanks Fran! Daisy deer has taught me well about being alert and tapping into gut instinct. Many people today talk themselves out of their instinct. They think they’re being silly. We should be teaching our children and young people to regard “instinct” as an important red flag and indicator that something is not right.

      I saw photos of how Lady Liberty came over in 1885 in 350 pieces (in crates)! It took 4 months to reassemble her on the platform! When you look at the work done in France, and then the work done here to put her together and then the financing it took in both France and America… well, it’s pretty amazing. We were even able to see her from the plane as we were coming into LaGuardia. She is as tall as some of the buildings and is very noticeable from a distance.

      Oh I have lots of funny photos of Jule’s, Chris and the kids. My favorite is a shot I made well ahead of the group (still behind our fearless leader, FD, though) where we went past a very smelly and fly-ridden fish market in Chinatown. Jule’s face was one of disgust and I heard her say, “LOOK AT THE FLIES!!!!” Ha ha! So many good memories and so many laughs.

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        1. You nailed it… and I’m glad I’m documenting all of this. Already I am having trouble remembering what all we did in a day! Thank goodness Jules kept a daily journal.

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  3. At least you HAVE an inner compass. I have none. I carry a map and use my own method of landmarks and seldom get lost, but it is a struggle. We also visited Ellis Island to find my Grandfather’s name on the list. We did find it and it was an emotional moment. I also follow the Paleo diet but I really struggled to eat on our recent trip. I hope you’ll share some of the ways you coped as I came home with a very upset tummy and am only just now, after two weeks, coming good. The trouble with eating so cleanly at home is it is very difficult to replicate when traveling. Another enjoyable post, thank you!!

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    1. Ardys, we were worried too that we would have trouble finding foods we could eat being on Paleo, but we found most places were just fine making substitutions. In fact, we never got a snarly look like we’d asked for anything special. Most of our waiters were happy to comply or ask in the kitchen about what could be substituted. FD and I did not have any stomach issues which was great. We did have pizza one day, and probably some things were not cooked or sauteed in olive oil (probably vegetable oils) but we had no ill effects from it. I also found that most small markets and groceries – even drugstores had fruit for sale.

      I can well imagine that it was an emotional moment for you when you found your Grandfather’s records. The information we found on our Grandpa did not match up completely. The ship manifest information was very helpful, but it only made for confusion. Grandpa never talked much about why he came to America and we were discouraged from asking him about it. This perplexing information from Ellis Island only made us more curious. But, Grandpa is gone, and his reasons or secrets are his own. I do know that Grandpa was very proud to be an American, and he loved this country.

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    1. Jeepers! I guess I could give up fruit… but I can’t seem to give up cheese! We get cheese that comes from grass-fed cows now, and we use it sparingly so I do get my cheese fix now and then!

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    2. Ardysez, If I may ask, what happens when you eat them? Does the high sugar make your stomach burn? (that’s what happens to me) I can eat pears, but only if they are on the green side. If they are soft and sugary, then not a chance! 😛

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  4. I know what you mean about diets. With my pre war diet, finding fod that is not processed is a trial when you are travelling. however speaking of travelling. now I REALLY want to go to New York. great trip so far!!. c

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    1. Hi Cecilia! Special diets always make for a bit of difficulty when traveling, but we asked for substitutions or a change up and most every place we dined at was happy to comply however they could. There was no way to know if foods were prepared as we would have done at home, but we managed the best we could.

      There is so much more to tell about the trip… so many tips I would have for people. I am really going to dedicate some time to doing reviews on TripAdvisor.com so that others might benefit from things we learned. NYC is an exciting place… but as they say, “There’s no place like home” and I was surely glad to be back to our family here (the animals!).

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      1. the hardest bit is leaving the animals. It is not even october yet and i am worrying about mine. hope you are having a restful sunday in your forest..

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        1. What is in October? Forgive me… I tend to forget everything! Who cares for your critters when you are gone? It’s a very hot day today, and I’ve had a headache since I got up. We went to star gaze with a friend last night – he has an amazing telescope! We were out until the wee hours looking at planets, stars and constellations, and having wonderful “life” conversation. Amazing night for all of us! So I think being up late, head cocked back a lot, allergies and now the heat, I was destined for a head banger. I’m ironing FD’s clothes for work, and enjoying “Super Soul Sunday” on the Oprah Winfrey Network. I’m opting for a nap if this headache doesn’t lift soon! How is your Sunday going?

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          1. we have had a lovely day, I got time to weed int he garden and i know this sounds weird but i love to weed. In October I am going to NZ for my fourth sons wedding, And again in January for my second sons wedding. So i am doing a lot of planning to make sure the animals are cared for. John is actually not the best person for the job, he does not look carefully enough.. he cannot think like an animal.. i know you understand that one.. c

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          2. You know I do understand! FD is wonderful with animals, but in some situations I have argued with him a bit when I put myself into the animal’s mind – it’s as if I can feel the situation from their view. We can have a relationship – understanding and connection with animals and birds… but I think it is rare. I wish I lived closer so that I could learn your schedule and get a feel for the daily routine. I really got lucky with Sissy Jo. We don’t have as much going on here as you do, as far as chores go, and the garden is not a must do duty. But I was surprised how Sissy managed to observe the deer and dogs and in just a day had managed so much bonding with them, and of all things that Daisy ate from her hands, well, I was just bowled over!

            I like weeding too! You would really enjoy it here with the sandy soil. Weeds just pull up and the dirt falls off! The down side to that is sand does not hold water very well, and so I drag hoses around all summer long. Our well water is so sandy that it destroys soaker hoses and sprinklers… watering is a true chore here in Oklahoma!

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    1. Ha ha! Thank you, Yvonne. I think the people watching was the most interesting. I certainly had a better understanding of how it must be living day to day in such a huge city.

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  5. You are making me wish to go! I am curious, but did you get to see the fossilized dinosaur prints in the rocks in Central Park? Did you go to the museum and look at their bones? These things have interested me since I was a child and saw some children investigating them in a film on TV.

    I loved your descriptions of the Lady Liberty, and the Pink clad lady/man on the train! What fun! Thank you for sharing your adventures with us, Lori!

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    1. Ha ha! Lynda, you are just ahead of me! My next post will cover our visit to the Museum of Natural History. We did view the dinosaurs there, but we truly spent most of our time looking at North American mammals. We did not see any fossilized dinosaur prints in Central Park, but then we weren’t looking for any either! Gosh, Central Park was enormous, and really would take a couple of days to cover all of the trails. Every turn offered something different, unusual and beautiful.

      I am so glad you are enjoying these posts on our trip. I will have one or two more to go… but I’m in the middle of roasting tomatoes and making sauce plus my regular work! It’s exhausting!! I am so far behind reading other blogs… I miss my reading and writing time!

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      1. Apparently, I made up the memory of the fossil footprints in the rocks… sorry. I remember children climbing the rocks in Central Park in the dinosaur movie I watched about the Natural history museum, but the prints are a figment of my imagination! Sorry… (insert sheepish grin here)

        Roasted tomato sauce??? Sounds divine! Recipe? (! ! !)

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        1. I plan to do a post about Roasted Tomato Sauce… kind of my own concoction over the years. I have seriously got to find some time to write all of these posts I want to do! I have deer news too. There’s just not enough of me!

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          1. I certainly understand, Lori! So much to say, and work gets in the way!

            Think we could get away with writing more if we declared ourselves writers as our profession?

            Oh, I think not. 😉

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          2. I tell people all of the time that I am a writer… and of course we ARE, Lynda! Unfortunately, that does not create more time for us to write. I would write every day if I could. But this place would be a true jungle, there wouldn’t be wonderful meals to eat, and the garden would go to pot! And you… I have no idea how you are managing two places right now. And there is MUCH to do, eh?

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          3. HA, don’t I understand that dilemma. As for us, well, it is the every other week method for the 2 farmlets. One weekend here, and the next up there. Not much gets done, but we keep trying to at least look respectable from the outside. 😉

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  6. Thanks for the great tour of the city — that was fun! I was reminded that my parents took three small children up into Lady Liberty’s crown back in 1966, can you imagine that? I think they have a photo somewhere of the tight spiral staircase they had to climb with us in tow. Crazy.

    I was curious about that stone pillar with the bat and owl sculptures. I googled it and found someone who had blogged about all the sculptures in Central Park here: https://thishandcraftedlife.wordpress.com/2012/12/09/central-parks-other-zoo/ Apparently the owl and bat are supposed to symbolize night, and there was another pillar with a rooster to symbolize morning or day. Very interesting.

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    1. Hi Kim! Yes the rooster stone figure was just a few steps away at an opposing pillar. I saw that web link when I was researching the owl and bat. All through the park there were so many sculptures and beautiful pillars and bridges. The water fountains and iron fences and gates, made for a splendor that is indescribable.

      I can’t imagine going up the steps to the crown. I would have done it if we had been able to though! We spent a lot more time than I thought we would at the Statue of Liberty. I can’t believe the experience touched me like it did!

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  7. Hi Lori, What a punishing sight seeing schedule! I don’t know how you kept up the pace. Just exploring Central Park would have been enough for me for one day. I think I would have been tempted to find a nice comfy seat in the shade and watch the world go by whilst drinking something icy cold.

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    1. You are exactly right about punishing schedule!! It was very exhausting, but we all agreed on the sights we wanted to see while we were there. Just wait until you read the next post. We start wearing out a bit physically with the demanding schedule. My sister says it will be her only trip to NYC, but FD and I hope to go back again in a couple of years. There is so much more to take in.

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  8. Great posts about your NYC trip. I’ve been there three times, but there weren’t any naked cowboys or girls. You certianly see some unusual people there. French people love to shop in NYC, because American makes such as Levis cost three times less and American cotton in general is so hard wearing. Did you know we have three small Statues of Liberty in Paris? Apparently preparatory projects by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi for the larger than life Lady.

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    1. Oh Henrietta, I thought so much of you the day we visited Lady Liberty. She was so gorgeous. I got a bit emotional thinking of all of the work that went into her, and what a magnificent gift from the people of France. I understood it was quite an expense for both countries.

      I think the Naked Cowgirls are a fairly new addition to Times Square. The Naked Cowboy has been around for a while. He was actually very pleasant and decent (no winking or strutting around suggestively). Lots of “unusual” people… which I find fascinating. Those memories make for the best storytelling!

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  9. Great narrative – again! North America has never ever attracted us but we do one day want to go to NYC. However, after reading your NYC series (more to come, I am sure) we are wondering whether a vist “up there” would be necessary! 😉

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    1. Thank you Mandeep! If you do decide to go, there is much more information that I can give you. I am doing reviews on TripAdvisor.com, and that is the site where I gleaned a lot of information about planning our trip. FD and I have decided we will go again some day. It takes time to really see and know a city. One week wasn’t enough!

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  10. Lovely post, Big Sister! We certainly did have some great adventures on the trip! I can’t count how many times I have noticed a scene in a movie or a tv show (since we returned home) and said, “I know that place, we were there… in NYC!” I feel so “educated” after touring the city, as there is so much history there that I had never really paid much attention to. And although Chris and I don’t have any plans to return any time soon, we are so glad this opportunity for Emily presented itself when it did! This is a trip we probably never would have chosen for our family vacation, but we are so glad now that it was chosen for us! I think everyone should experience NYC at least once in their life!!

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    1. Ah, doesn’t the Universe always give us what we need when we need it? Even if we don’t catch the train to a new adventure or opportunity the first time it’s offered, the train returns time and again to give us that chance. It is in the plan all along… I’m so happy that we all took this chance – this opportunity. When you and I are little old ladies we will be talking about this adventure of a lifetime – each remembering the parts that touched us deeply.

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