What I Imagine To Be A Brave Fight

Daisy with her twins on July 6th, 2013. The little buck getting a bath and the tiny doe behind.
Daisy with her twins on July 6, 2013. The little buck getting a bath and the tiny doe behind.

From the time Daisy deer delivered her twins in early June, it was evident her mothering instinct was strong and going full-throttle.  For the first couple of weeks before giving birth, and for roughly a month after giving birth, a deer mother will patrol and protect her birthing territory with vigilance.  Daisy was no exception to this rule.  During this period, she was more alert and watchful than I had ever seen her.  I often caught sight of her checking the perimeters of what she had chosen as her birthing territory.  For Daisy, this area covered approximately 5-acres of land.

Daisy on patrol in the neighbor's backyard. She clobbered one of the neighbor's 3 dogs the day she gave birth and from that day on, the dogs stayed clear of Daisy!
Daisy on patrol in the neighbor’s backyard. She clobbered one of the neighbor’s 3 dogs the day she gave birth and from that day on, the dogs stayed clear of Daisy!

After giving birth to her twins, Daisy settled in to a daily routine.  She would graze and feed throughout the day and into the nighttime.  Lactating mother’s eat almost constantly to provide nutrition to their young.  While filling her belly, however, Daisy did not venture very far from where her young were bedded down – generally in separate places.  Before nursing either fawn, Daisy carefully conducted a patrol around the property, making sure it was safe to bring her babies out for feeding.  She cleverly walked in the cover of trees, shrubs, and tall weeds to make her way to a secure nursing area.

When she neared the area where she knew her fawns were hiding, she communicated with a slight “buzzing” noise delivered soft and low.  This was her “moo” call to let a fawn know to come to her.  Once fed, she let the baby exercise for a while, usually in a well-shaded and protected area.  When sufficiently tired, the fawn would choose a place to bed down nearby. Daisy waited for the fawn to settle in its spot, and would then either go off to graze or rest nearby where she could keep an eye out for predators or other signs of danger.

Daisy keeping watch on the knoll near an area where she beds down the fawns in the afternoon.
Daisy keeping watch on the knoll near an area where she beds down the fawns in the afternoon.

When the twins were a month old, I noticed Daisy was more relaxed about exercise time and having both fawns together.  She did not run after the frolicking fawns to keep them close like she did when they were tiny.  Rather, she allowed them room to explore, and to have time to play hide and seek or a game of tag.  Play time for fawns is important for developing good muscle tone and skills of dodging objects and fleeing danger.  Playing tag or chase are excellent games for building strong legs to carry a fawn quickly away from trouble.  Games of hide and seek help to develop alertness and the kind of hiding skills a young deer will need for survival.  Often while playing, the fawns would disappear into the woods and out of sight from Daisy, only to show up seconds later in full chase.  The little buck, however, always pushed the limits.  Several times, I saw Daisy run off to the woods after him when he did not reappear with his sister.  That boy always seemed to have a mind of his own!

Daisy investigates a foreign object rolling across the driveway. Everything is considered a predator!
Daisy investigates a foreign object rolling across the driveway. Everything is considered a predator!

After a month of observing the fawns, we decided on names for them.  In the end, it was their personalities that led us to the names “Rowdy” and “Spirit”. Rowdy, the little buck, was just as his name suggested.  He was rambunctious and wayward.  From the time he was only a wee fawn, we often saw Daisy running after him, mooing her command for him to mind and come back.  But Rowdy seldom seemed to pay much attention to Daisy’s calls.  During my research into animal rehabilitation, I remember reading that orphaned bucks could be quite destructive and wayward, and that it was often wise to free them at three months of age when they were weaned.

When Rowdy and Spirit played together, they could often be heard “mewing” in excitement while running and leaping about.  As this was going on, Daisy simply grazed nearby, keeping an eye out and offering a lick or bath when one of the fawns came near to her.  Like Rowdy, the little doe, Spirit, loves to run, leap, and gambol about. But she is always mindful of Daisy and tends not to venture too far from her.  I have many photos of Daisy and Spirit together, grazing, or resting and grooming each other.  Obviously, a special bond exists between mother and daughter of all species.

Daisy intently investigates the empty plant container - still on the move, rolling in the wind.
Daisy intently investigates the empty plant container – still on the move and rolling in the wind.

Always, Daisy was a ferociously, protective mother.  She hoofed off feral cats in the area, and chased opossums and armadillos from the canyon.  She seemed to understand it would not be wise to tangle with skunks, but still made sure they were well on their way from her territory, by “pushing” them from a safe distance and waiting for them to leave.  I also noticed hoof marks on Daisy occasionally.  These were possibly the result of warding off other does, while Rowdy and Spirit were still very young. More than once, I observed Daisy crashing through the brush and trees in the woods, going after something that she considered a threat.  She is a fearless mother.

Hmm, better have a closer look, since buckets often contain corn or deer chow!
Hmm, better have a closer look, since buckets often contain corn or deer chow!

One morning about three weeks ago, Daisy came home with a rather large puncture wound on her left side.  Spirit too, had a patch of raw skin on her neck. A thunderstorm had come up the night before, so we assumed they had been spooked and, literally, ran into trouble.

In the days to follow, I noticed Daisy licking both her and Spirit’s wounds.  Though it took a long time for Daisy’s open puncture wound to close and heal, she never acted as if it bothered her. In contrast, Spirit’s wound healed rather quickly, even though it did leave a bit of a scar on her neck.  I often wondered what happened to Daisy and Spirit that night.  Was it simply the storm spooking them, or had something threatened Spirit, and had Daisy gone to battle to protect her?

Thursday morning, July 11th, Rowdy and Spirit resting in the pasture after a rousting game of chase!
Thursday morning, July 11th, Rowdy and Spirit resting in the pasture after a rousting game of chase!

Friday, this past week, I saw Daisy out bright and early with Rowdy and Spirit.  Daisy was eating deer chow, while the twins played chase nearby.  I grabbed my camera and sat on the slope above, watching the trio go about their morning routine.  Rowdy stopped for a bit of respite at the old bathtub that sits just below the slope and serves as a water station for all wildlife.  Lately, I noticed the fawns were mimicking Daisy while she grazed, and had recently seen them feeding on some greens themselves.  They often smelled and nibbled on what they observed Daisy eating.  Now, Rowdy had picked up on how to get water from the tub, and drew in a long drink before heading off to the west.  Daisy and Spirit followed. Perhaps Daisy had given up trying to control Rowdy’s wayward ways, I thought, and was now allowing him be the leader for the morning – at least until he tuckered out for a nap!

Rowdy has learned to drink water from the old bathtub down in the canyon. The bathtub is refilled with fresh water two or three times a week. All sorts of wildlife can be found drawing water from this source.
Rowdy has learned to drink water from the old bathtub down in the canyon. The bathtub is refilled with fresh water two or three times a week. All sorts of wildlife can be found drawing water from this source.

Later that morning, at around 10:30, I noticed the heat was beginning to get the best of me.  I had just finished weeding and watering in the garden, and was shutting off the hydrant, when I saw something black dart along the fence at the edge of the woods.  Before I could make out what it was, however, the dark form disappeared into the woods near where Daisy often bedded Rowdy and Spirit.  I quickly drove the electric buggy across the pasture to the slope, hoping to catch sight of whatever it was as it passed through the woods.  Seeing nothing moving to the north towards the pecan orchard, I drove back to the south and checked the area of thick weeds where I had originally seen the animal disappear.  Again, I found nothing.  From there, I drove down the lane to the canyon bottom, weaving in and out of trees in hopes of seeing something that would help to solve this mystery.  But alas, there was nothing to be seen down there either, so I finally gave up.  Hopefully, I thought, the unidentified critter had moved on elsewhere.

Thursday morning, July 11th. Daisy leads her fawns to graze on chicory and other good eats in the canyon.
Thursday morning, July 11th. Daisy leads her fawns to graze on chicory and other good eats in the canyon.

At noon,  just after preparing FD’s lunch, I looked out the back door (as I usually do when I pass in that direction) and spotted Daisy, having a nibble of corn at the feeder below the slope.  Grabbing a handful of fresh blackberries, I hurried down the hill to give her a treat while the fawns were not with her.  I always culled the bird-pecked berries and saved them for Daisy.  She absolutely loves blackberries.  As I neared Daisy at the feeder, I quickly became horrified at what I saw.  My heart raced and my gut tightened.  My girl’s face was covered with dried blood!  Her left ear had a one-inch split at the top and the blood from that wound was dried and crusted on the ear and down the side of her face.  I began to fret even more as I looked over the rest of her body.  There were large patches of hairless skin down her back and sides, and they were red with irritation.  In these patches, there were scratches – some still oozing with gooey blood, and other areas where bruising had already set in, looking purple, and swollen, and angry.  Daisy was panting harder than I had ever seen her do before.  What in the world had happened to her?  Did it have anything to do with that black animal I spotted earlier?

Daisy moves forward in the extreme heat, panting heavily. She plods on, despite being wounded, to find her fawns.
Daisy moves forward in the extreme heat, panting heavily. She plods on, despite being wounded, to find her fawns.

Hearing my despair, FD raced down the slope to calm me, thinking Daisy just had a few barbed-wire scratches – her usual.  He too was taken aback by her bloodied, beaten and bruised appearance.  He noted the torn right ear where an artery had likely been slashed in a fight.  Two of the three snaps on her orange collar were undone.  Whatever Daisy fought, it had attacked her from the front mostly, but a large “paw” slash also marked her back, just above her tail. Perhaps Daisy had encountered more than one attacker?

I had difficulty getting close-up shots of Daisy's overall wounds. She did not seem to want our attention and she was clearly en-route to be with her fawns.
I had difficulty getting close-up shots of Daisy’s overall wounds. She did not seem to want our attention and she was clearly en-route to be with her fawns.

Daisy did not linger long at the feeder, and walked off favoring her right front leg.  She was still panting hard, though some of that could be contributed to the near 100° temperature we were experiencing at the time.  Despite her slight limp, she ambled up the slope in urgency, taking her normal patrol route inside the fence line of our property, and heading to the iris beds where the fawns often bedded down in the mornings.  After sounding her mooing call in the iris beds, Daisy located Spirit and nursed her for a short time.  When Spirit was through, it did not take Daisy long to bed down for some rest herself. She licked Spirit, then licked herself, and appeared to catch her breath in the shade of the big oak tree towering above her.

Daisy locates and nurses little Spirit.
Daisy locates and nurses little Spirit.

Within an hour, I noticed that Daisy was up and appeared to be looking for Rowdy in his usual spot on a knoll overlooking the canyon.  However, I did not see that she was successful in finding him.  By early evening, Daisy was on the move again, this time sniffing the ground and catching scent while traveling along slowly.  FD and I followed her, keeping watch from a distance.  I had already been out looking for Rowdy most of the afternoon and FD joined me when he got home from work.  It was pitiful listening to Daisy moo, and groan, while looking for her little buck.

Time and again, Daisy’s nose took her to a few spots where perhaps the scent of her boy still lingered.  She followed a trail west into our woods, then over the fence to the pecan orchard.  In here, she lingered at times, putting her nose to the air, or smelling grasses.  After a while, she headed back to the feeding area on our property. Then, back up the slope and around the perimeter of the fence bordering our property, she continued her search for Rowdy, mooing constantly.  At dark, FD and I watched Daisy and Spirit grazing just beyond the front porch.  They were doing what deer do at night – just the two of them.

Bedding down with Spirit nearby, Daisy takes time to rest and catch her breath. Soon she will go in search of her boy, Rowdy.
Bedding down with Spirit nearby, Daisy takes time to rest and catch her breath. Soon she will go in search of her boy, Rowdy.

Saturday morning, I donned my hiking boots and headed to the woods, again in search of Rowdy.  I saw Daisy twice, also searching.  The area is vast and, with an abundance of spring rains this year, much of it is overgrown with weeds, trees and brush.  I gave up my search for a while when the afternoon heat got the best of me.  Then, around 4:00, I set out again, following Daisy, who was going along the same path as before.  As she walked along, her mooing increased, sometimes ending in a long, low groan.  At times my eyes became so blurry with tears I could hardly keep Daisy in sight.

Still, we continued our search and I noticed that Daisy would occasionally look my way as I walked a distance behind her.  I wondered if I was more irritating than being a help to her.  While Daisy is gifted with a tremendous sense of smell, it is difficult for humans to track anything in the woodlands. My sense of smell is pathetic next to hers, and my vision is limited.  Also, human feet leave a large imprint on the woodland floor.  And, though I tried to walk softly and avoid stepping on dead, brittle wood or dried leaves, I could not come close to the quietness of Daisy’s nimble, dainty hooves.  But together we walked, this odd pair, in search of Rowdy. 

Finally, Daisy ducked under a fence and into a property with a completely impassable woodland area.  At this point, I was not about to crawl through the thick brambles and poison ivy in order to follow her.  I did not want to encounter snakes, both on the ground and in trees.  It was dark and insect-infested in there. I was already miserably hot and sweaty, and wishing I had thought to take water with me.   Sadly, I walked back to our gate alone.  But by the time my heavy boots took me to the end of the long animal trail, I found myself greeted by Daisy at the feeding station.  She had already walked skillfully through the dense, dark woods and beat me home!

Thursday, July 11, 2013. A tender moment with Daisy and Rowdy, the day before Daisy's battle and Rowdy's disappearance.
Thursday, July 11, 2013. A tender moment with Daisy and Rowdy, the day before Daisy’s battle and Rowdy’s disappearance.

Sunday morning has brought rain and cooler temperatures to the ten-acre ranch.  When I walked with Daisy this morning, I noticed the rain had helped to clean her wounds.  It has been hard for me to see Daisy so beat up and battered.  It has also been very distressing for me to watch her roam and search for her boy, calling out and alertly listening for any response.  And again, in this morning’s gentle rain, Daisy continues her search – stopping to look and listen, catching scent, and finally moving onward. I hope she finds her little Rowdy boy.  I hope he finds her.  I pray for a happy ending to this long, and heart-wrenching search.  But mostly, I am thankful Daisy survived the attack – that she fought a brave fight in defense of her son… and herself.

© Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…


48 thoughts on “What I Imagine To Be A Brave Fight

    1. Thank you Charla. I am praying the same… meanwhile I continue to watch for Rowdy. Daisy is bedded down in the pasture tonight, and Spirit is in the iris beds across the way. I’m sure they are sticking close to home territory in case Rowdy makes his way back, by instinct.

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  1. Oh Lori, I’m crying with you. Those poor little girls clearly have a story to tell, and I hope Rowdy shows up soon! I know how hard it is for you to allow Daisy to live her life in the wild after you bonded so closely with her, and I can only imagine your worry. My thoughts will be with you in the coming days as you continue waiting for Rowdy. Please keep me posted….

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    1. Thank you for your kind words, Kim. I am better today. The last two days have been difficult. I struggled to write this post. Looking through photographs of Rowdy was extremely difficult. Daisy’s mooing is also very hard to hear. We are trying to be positive. Hopefully, Rowdy just ran off on his own or got chased. If he’s out there, instinct will bring him back to his home territory.

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    1. Thank you Mike. There is still a chance Rowdy is around.The doe generally will look for 3 to 4 days for a fawn. Even then, she may continue to search as long as she finds scent or something to go on. She was at it again this morning in the rain, nose to ground, mooing every little bit. Her udder is so full it looks about to explode. I feel for her… but animals are resilient. I just hope for the best.

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  2. I have stopped blogging since my dear Scottie Elizabeth passed in Feb, and I’ve pretty much stopped reading blogs, but yours I still read. I hope Daisy finds her boy and that their little family is ok, keep us posted!

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    1. Oh, Kat, I’m so sorry you are struggling. It is so difficult to pull ourselves out of pain at times. I completely understand withdrawing to care for self at times – I’ve done it myself. Take all of the time you need to grieve, and heal. Thank you for thinking of Daisy and her family. I’ll be sure to keep everyone posted, and I’m hoping so much I’ll have good news to report.

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  3. More prayers for Rowdy. Your writing is so good. The story just brings tears to my eyes. Thank you for sharing your stories, and Daisy’s, with us.

    Sue

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    1. Oh, thank you so much Sue. Your words mean so much. This piece was very hard to write, but it helped me to document it. The photographs were so hard to choose. The hardest thing was looking at Rowdy in photos. It broke my heart. But, each day is a new one, with hope. Daisy was out mooing around, searching again this morning. I took her some blackberries and pear tomatoes. She stopped to eat, give me a few licks, and moved on, nose to the ground. What else can a mother do?

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  4. I’ve had a hard time reading this…the tears are flowing for you all…I’ll be keeping you and Daisy in my thoughts and prayers…

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  5. My Dear Sister, you are always in my thoughts. I continue to pray for Daisy, and both her fawns; I’m holding out for a miracle that Rowdy returns to his mama. I’m praying for you too; this has just got to be so hard. This was a great post, and I hope we all get to read a positive follow up that Rowdy is safe and sound. Much love to you…

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    1. Thank you Baby Sister. You always seem to know my heart… and how much I love nature. I’ll be keeping everyone informed, and hopefully we will find Rowdy “safe and sound”. Thank you so much for your prayer… that means more than anything. I love you too!

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  6. I hope Rowdy comes back home and Daisy gets her son back. Very distressing. I also wonder what that black thing was, and whether it did indeed have anything to do with Daisy’s injuries. Do you get big cats in that area?

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    1. Mostly bobcats, but I’ve heard tell of mountain lions. I don’t think it was anything as big as a mountain lion. I think one of those would have killed her. More likely wild dogs, a bobcat, or maybe a coyote. The claw marks were sharp, like a cat though.

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  7. Nature can seem so cruel and I have experienced loss of ducks and chickens who were the sweetest things I could have ever wanted. It wrenches at our heart and whole being to see them captured and drug off by coyote or to know that they put up a fight to survive. My sincere compassion of your feelings and Daisy’s possible loss. I know animals have as much love in them as we humans and what they feel should not be taken into any less consideration than that of how we would feel. May God protect Daisy and her little doe so that they will live long lives. Your friend in love of what God created. Rachel

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    1. What a beautifully written comment, Rachel. Thank you for so many kind words. I feel too, that animals have great love in them. I have witnessed it. To hear the longing and urgency in Daisy’s mooing is heartbreaking, and what one of us doesn’t do the same when we have lost someone we love? Daisy has weathered much injury in her life, and this whole month and a half she has been the most ferocious mother to these twins. Whatever battle she fought, I am thankful that she lived and did not come to any great harm. Thank you for being such a wonderful and compassionate friend.

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  8. I would like to say I hope the little buck returns but i know that nature is cruel sometimes. I hope Daisy and Spirit the best in the coming days and weeks, and you as well. I never really imagined a deer would have such struggles. Thank you for sharing Daisy’s story. I love hearing about it, even if not always happy.

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    1. Oh, thank you so much. I did not know much about deer or their struggle in the wild either, until Daisy came into our lives. Now, I soak up every bit of information I can get my hands on, so that I can better understand Daisy’s world… and the world of all nature. I find so much of the time that it is not so different than ours. Yet, wildlife seems to be so much more resilient than the human species. Daisy will get through this time of searching, whatever the outcome is. I am very thankful her own injuries were not life-threatening, and that she is healing nicely. The cooler weather and rain has been beneficial at this time too. It’s helped Daisy achieve some comfort, and if Rowdy is still alive, it increases his chances for survival. Thanks again for thinking of us.

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  9. I’m so sorry – nature can be beautiful, but there are harsh realities to contend with. I so hope Rowdy finds his way home, and especially that Daisy heals well. Thanks for sharing the story with us.

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    1. Thank you. It feels good to know that so many people are thinking of us. We still have hope that Rowdy is around and that he and Daisy will find each other. I will be sure to keep everyone posted this week.

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  10. When you write how the fawns are so active and playful, we forget that they are tiny in a large world full of danger. Prayers for Rowdy and Daisy.
    You do know that a little book “Lessons from a Deer Mother” would be a delightful Christmas gift book – or a wonderful baby shower gift. I know right now with Rowdy missing that may not be in your list of things to do, but put it on a post it for later?
    HUGS and hopes

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    1. Thanks… and yes, FD and I are talking about a book… but I get overwhelmed! So much to think about! There are so many ways to go with a book – or books. I never liked how the old fairy tales have been changed over the years to have “happy” endings, to protect the innocence of children. Life is full of danger and we do need to nurture our children with stories that teach following instinct, being alert, and yet encourage play and discovery. What has happened with Daisy and Rowdy is part of real life. Daisy can’t control safety in the woodlands, and she can’t control Rowdy’s wayward ways, but she has done her best to show them how to survive. Hopefully, instinct will help them find each other, and if that isn’t possible, we accept it and move on. When I write a book, I hope that it will be joyous and yet practical. Thanks for your encouragement. It means so much!

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      1. A not too long, insightful with some light humorous points about raising youngsters could be a big sellers for moms and grandmoms. A kids’ one could use more of your lovely pictures and be more of life in the forest story.
        You have great material. It is hard to get started and decided which to pick ( start with pictures first for kids, then add words…not many for a easy reader/picture book that would find it’s way into libraries as well as homes.

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        1. This is a lovely idea! Just this morning I had some “signs” come my way that encouraged the book idea and also spoke to me about necessary changes in personal thoughts about my abilities. Your comments are another sign that I can do this! Thank you so much for your encouragement. It means more than you know!

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  11. Oh my goodness! what a story… how sad you surely were to see the deer in such distress…. we have just moved out to “the country” and have a mama and fawn that frequent our land each morning and evening. Its amazing how attached one can become, just thinking about how I’d feel to see one morning without either mama or baby, makes me get teary. Praying that it all works itself out.

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    1. Oh I am so happy you commented!! Some time back I changed to a different reader, then somehow lost URL’s for many of the people I followed! Your blog was one of them! How happy I am that today I hear from you! I am excited you have moved to the country and are enjoying nature more! Thank you for thinking of Daisy and her little family. It means so much.

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    1. I understand, Sandy. It was difficult to put the post together, and going through the photos was really hard. What I am thankful for is that Daisy lived. I’m still hoping little Rowdy and Daisy will find each other.

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  12. Awwwww :/ she’s such a good mom. We have it so easy compared to wildlife. We’re so used to our safe little place but actually it’s not at all hat “normal” is it.. thanks for the reminder.

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    1. You are so sweet and wise. Humans make so much drama and chaos over events in life. It isn’t easy to move on after something unpleasant or horrible happens. I’m sure animals and all of wildlife grieve or suffer from loss, but they resiliently move on, living in the moment and not the past. In “The Power of NOW”, Eckhart Tolle describes how humans tend to hang onto negative emotion and even create a worse scenario by not letting go and moving on. Read Eckhart’s “The Duck Story” narrative, or watch video on Google. I sometimes wonder that animals are more evolved than we are!

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  13. I got incredibly sad reading this post. I might be on the other side of the world from your world and Daisy and her journey into motherhood but I feel like it is part of me and personal. I am so sorry about Daisies fight and Rowdy being missing presumed gone :(. All we can do is hope that he is hiding someplace. Whatever it was that attacked Daisy and her fawns must have been quite big. Roaming dogs? Again, all I can do is tell you how amazingly sorry I am.

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    1. Thank you, Fran. So many people feel the same, I think. It feels like a punch in the gut, but I am trying to rise above my sadness and I try to be positive about Rowdy. Already, Daisy is looking better and her wounds are healing. Mother Nature is providing gentle rain and cooler weather to help aid Daisy in healing and comfort. Spirit is spry as ever. Time moves on. I really hope Rowdy and Daisy will find each other.

      Daisy is a small deer. She never grew to be as big as some of the does we have seen. Still, she’s never shied away from standing her ground with other does, and I’ve seen her fight off plenty of critters. Whatever this was a dog or bobcat or possibly two of something, I do not know. It’s apparent Daisy was mostly injured on her right side, and her face and ears. The loss of hair and bruising is more than I’ve ever seen on her. We would occasionally see a small patch of hairless skin after another doe hoofed her, but this was massive.

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      1. My guess is bobcats or dogs and most likely the cats as they tend to jump on backs where dogs go for the throat. I am so glad that Daisy is alright as you would have been heartbroken to lose her now. All we can do is pray that Rowdy comes back.

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  14. Putting aside political correctness and adding a little sexism to boot – Rowdy sounds like a typical stubborn male to me (I have that trait myself) and if I were a betting person, I would bet that Rowdy is doing fine and keeping a low profile. I do hope that he is fine and he will surprise you upon returning with more growth and more and more of that guy stubborn thing. I cannot help but be an optimist (even though a lot of my idealism has been tempered with age into realism) and I’ll betcha he shows up. Until then you, FD, Daisy, and Spirit will be in my thoughts with a big heapin’ of good wishes for Rowdy’s safety. I wish that I could physically help in the search but geography plays a role in that but please know I would if I could. All of y’all take care and peace to you and yours. When that book is published, I’ve got dibs on a first edition copy with autograph – OK? Yeah ok!!!!

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    1. You betcha Louis! I will be glad to autograph for blog readers! I’ve been getting a lot of “signs” that a book is needed, and after some thought, I feel it is what I need to do – write a positive book about what Daisy has taught me. Thanks for your encouragement… and for a positive view of the current situation. I’m so thankful Daisy is healing. I was just down at the feeder with Daisy (gave her two pear tomatoes) and Spirit actually approached fairly close to me when she saw Daisy come for the tomatoes. I hope you’re right about Rowdy… just being a month and a half old, he is able to eat greens, find water and run (fast but not for long distances yet), and he can do his bathroom business on his own now. According to what I’ve read, at this age his survival on his own would maybe be a week, two at the most. I’ve read that fawns really need their mother’s milk for 3 months, then they could survive on their own. Of course what do we know? Every life form is different and what one might succumb to another will rebel. I’m just being hopeful and positive. Daisy hasn’t given up and neither will I!

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    1. Thank you Marie Anne. We are trying to be hopeful about Rowdy. I am thankful that Daisy survived the battle and that she’s healing. After the rain, her wounds are clean and we’ve had a better look at her injuries. We believe it was a bobcat that she fought with. We still haven’t turned up any clues about what happened as we have not found evidence of the fight. Daisy lost a lot of hair. Until we locate the scene of the fight, we don’t know if it involved Rowdy or not. I thank you for caring… it means so much.

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    1. Thank you, Tina. I’m struggling today. I’m running out of hope. I saw Daisy alone with Spirit again this morning. On a good note, Daisy is healing and the rain and cooler temperatures are likely bringing her comfort as well. I didn’t notice her mooing around either. Perhaps Daisy is accepting her loss. Like you, I am tender about animals. I am just so glad Daisy managed to fend off the bobcat (or whatever it was) and that her wounds weren’t life-threatening.

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