Two Thunderstorms Bring Two Little Miracles!

Yesterday morning, and again this morning, FD and I were awakened by the rumble of thunder and a downpour of rain. For the past two weeks, Oklahoma has seen more than its share of volatile weather. Tornadoes, hail, and flooding have wreaked havoc in most regions of the state. As another bolt of lightning flashed, I looked down from the bed and noticed poor Zoe, our smallest Japanese Chin, hoping for me to pick her up and tuck her into bed with me. Zoe has always feared storms and tonight she had herself worked up to the point of shaking uncontrollably and panting.

The past two days, Daisy had become very secretive, hiding in the brush, trees, and weeds in the neighbor's backyard.
The past two days, Daisy had become very secretive, hiding in the brush, trees, and weeds in the neighbor’s backyard.

With my shivering little Zoe girl next to me, I lay awake trying to soothe her. I could not sleep anyway, because my other girl, Daisy deer, was on my mind too. For the past two days Daisy had been spending time across the fence at the neighbor’s place. She had been very aloof and secretive. Last evening she had come to the fence after some coaxing with water and a little feed, but she did not stay long. She had been resting a lot the past two days, her udder had doubled in size and was now hanging like a large pendulum, and I just knew she would soon have her first fawn.

When the alarm went off this morning and I got up to start FD’s breakfast and let the dogs out to do their business, it was light enough out that I could see across the fence. But there was no Daisy in sight. She was not where I had seen her last night. So, as soon as FD drove off to work, I walked up and down the fence, hoping to catch a glimpse of Daisy, wondering if she had delivered her fawn. Then another thunderstorm moved in, and I retreated to the house for the rest of the morning. Finally, just before lunch, I could wait no longer. I climbed over the neighbor’s chain-linked fence very carefully, with my camera and zoom lens in tow, and began my search.

Our neighbor’s yard is overgrown with trees and weeds. “A perfect place to hide a fawn”, I thought to myself, as I made my way back to the steep ledge area that drops down to the pecan orchard. Our side of the fence slopes gently down to the canyon below. But our neighbor’s side drops off sharply, down a craggy hill that leads into a woodland bottom, lush with young trees, weeds, wild honeysuckle and the dreaded poison ivy plant. I did not want to venture down there myself and, instead, hoped to find Daisy in a nice, grassy area, maybe hidden in the shade of the trees up top. I walked a little further, finding an open spot in the trees where I could check out an area near an old trailer that sat dilapidated and falling apart. Sure enough, there she was! I could hardly believe my eyes! There, in the dappled sunlight, Daisy lay with her fawn. I dared not move closer, lest I ruin the moment. I snapped three photographs, and then I backed off, speaking gently to Daisy about how beautiful she was and how proud I was of her. The fawn did not react.

As I walked away, I saw Daisy get up and move through the trees towards the fence. I walked in the open, paralleling her path and heading to the spot in the fence where I first climbed over. I hoped to make it back across the fence and further west to where I saw Daisy headed. Reaching the crossing, I hung my camera on the fence, then hiked my leg over as best I could, but in my haste, I caught the crotch of my camouflage pants on the sharp barbs atop the fence. Drat! Maneuvering my leg back over so I could lift my pants a bit to free them, I then caught my sock on the chain-link barbs. Deciding my pants were more valuable than my socks, I boosted myself over, using my hands to distribute my weight and, in a pommel horse maneuver, rocked my other leg over, but ripped a big hole in the sock on the other foot! My dismount would have rated terribly in a gymnastics performance, but I did not care! I was on a mission to see Daisy and her new fawn again!

I walked quickly down the fence to where I thought Daisy would be, and found her looking straight at me, nibbling away on cat brier. Then, I looked down and noticed the little fawn, coming up next to her on shaky legs. At this point, I reached down to my pants pocket to retrieve my cell phone so I could give FD the wonderful news about our new grand-deer. Just as I hit the call button to dial FD’s work number, I saw movement to the rear of Daisy and the fawn. My jaw dropped. My heart skipped a beat! There were TWO FAWNS!! Oh, my goodness! How could this be? First time does almost always deliver a single fawn. When I looked again though, I could only see one fawn. FD was on the phone by then and I told him what I saw, but then, did I really see two? I looked and looked again, but still only saw one fawn. Now I was beginning to second guess myself. Was I going crazy?

Daisy and her twins when I first spied her this morning about 11:00 a.m. Both fawns were dry, Daisy was cleaned up, and the area was without visible evidence of a birthing. FD and I feel she delivered in the wee hours of the morning, during the first thunderstorm. The second thunderstorm would be a plus, helping to wash away any minute signs of a birth, keeping predators from being drawn to the area.
Daisy and her twins when I first spied her this morning about 11:00 a.m. Both fawns were dry, Daisy was cleaned up, and the area was without visible evidence of a birthing. FD and I feel she delivered in the wee hours of the morning, during the first thunderstorm. The second thunderstorm would be a plus, helping to wash away any minute signs of a birth, keeping predators from being drawn to the area.

After getting my call, FD hurried home from work but, by the time he arrived home, Daisy had already moved back into the woods and could not be sighted. We walked on to the house and I downloaded my photographs so FD could at least see pictures of Daisy’s new fawn – or was it fawns? By now, I could not be sure. But, upon opening the very first image, I saw Daisy and, sure enough, her TWO fawns. The one on the left was so near her, I suppose it just blended in and I did not see it when I first happened on the little family.

I have felt every emotion imaginable today. All afternoon, I continued to walk the fence in hopes of seeing Daisy and her fawns. During the mid afternoon, I was able to watch her nurse one of the fawns. Later, I saw her resting alone in the grass, and then observed her feeding on woodland plants, with those little fawns tagging along behind. I thought about all of the little details, and all of the big steps that took place, for Daisy to be where she was at this moment. Each time I saw her lick her fawns as they nursed, bonding and imprinting on them… I could not help but to think of those first days, just two short years ago, when I became Daisy deer’s mother – and how I so loved my little fawn…

Daisy looks on as one little fawn gets in place to nurse.
Daisy looks on as one little fawn gets in place to nurse.

© Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…


71 thoughts on “Two Thunderstorms Bring Two Little Miracles!

    1. I know, Kat! I am just amazed at how tiny they are! The weeds are so tall that it’s difficult to photograph them. They are so beautiful… and so is Daisy! I’m so proud.

      Like

  1. Proud Grandma and Grandpa!! You guys raised sweet Daisy well. What a wonderful gift to have two fawns, as well as Daisy to love. Congratulations!!

    Like

    1. Thanks, Susan! We are so happy about the twins, and very proud of our girl. Daisy has managed very well, keeping her connection with her human parents, yet living on her own as a wild deer. Now she will experience yet another facet of life!

      Like

    1. Thank you, Yvonne. I will feel a little better after the next couple of weeks. Fawns are so susceptible to predators during this time. I appreciate your well wishes so much!

      Like

    1. Thank you! So far, Daisy has only dined in the woods. She has not visited the feed pans, nor has she gotten water from our water tub. She’s keeping close to her fawns, and feeding on what nature provides. However, I’m sure she’ll be craving the high protein that the deer feed nourishes her with. The fawns will be feeding on it too, in a few weeks! We spoil all the deer who come to visit!

      Like

      1. They’ll all benefit from each feed of your high protein food – Daisy was very well set up for the birth. Won’t it be absolutely divine when she brings them closer to you!

        Like

        1. I’m so excited for the time when the fawns accompany Daisy to the feeder. We spend a good bit on nutritional feed, which not only supports the white-tail deer in the area, but raccoon, squirrels, birds and other small mammals. I gave off trying to ward off the other scavengers… if Daisy learned to share, then I don’t mind feeding other mouths. I often wonder how many of these other critters are feeding young as well?

          Like

  2. oh my goodness you are so fortunate to see such a wonderful spectacle. The images are amazing. Confused about Daisys orange necklace? What is it’s purpose? Keep us updated won’t you about the 2 fawns – beautiful. No work will be done in your place now while you watch on 🙂

    Like

    1. Ena, you are SO correct! I didn’t get a thing done yesterday! I was too busy hoping to catch view of Daisy and her little ones. We have kept an orange collar on Daisy since we took her in as an orphan. At first, it was to get her used to wearing a collar. Later, when we freed her to the wild, the collar offered protection. We hoped it would alert hunters to know she was raised by humans, and the reflective tape would make her visible to those traveling down a busy road nearby. It has also been a good thing to have the collar to make Daisy recognizable to folks in this part of town. People appreciate her presence, yet know to let her be.

      Like

  3. Lori, I just love that you were able to share this with us, and what a surprise that there were twins! Such beauties are an amazing and rare gift. Sending this link to Bob! 😀

    Like

    1. Lynda, maybe you will see many does with their fawns at the new Mountain Farmlet! It is wonderful to have seen Daisy’s life come full-circle. Even more amazing is how she has managed, having bonds with human parents, living in the wild, and now becoming a mother! I am so proud of her!

      Like

  4. Lori, I’m so thrilled that we get to share in your joy at Daisy becoming a mother and you becoming a deer grandma! This story just keeps getting better and better. Enjoy those babies — and get more pictures! xoxo

    Like

    1. FD took a few photos last night. I’ll try to post about that tonight or tomorrow. He actually got to hold them and determine that one is a doe and the other a little buck! I saw Daisy for a bit this morning at the feeder. She seemed very preoccupied! I’m still so giddy with happiness, Kim. What a gift Daisy has brought all of us!

      Like

  5. I loved this post! Daisy looks so beautiful and like she’s a wonderful mother, and her little fawns are absolutely adorable! Thanks for sharing all these beautiful moments with us 🙂

    Like

    1. Thanks Dounia! It was quite a feeling to see Daisy yesterday morning, laying there with her fawns. Had I noticed both fawns I probably would have jumped for joy! As it was, it was quite a beautiful scene. Daisy is such a wonder… I will always be proud of her and amazed by what she has brought all of us!

      Like

  6. You are surrounded by magic, my lovely friend. Good for you!
    I needed to read an uplifting post today and you never let me down. Thank you.

    Like

  7. I love the photo you captured of Daisy and her two fawns, she’s such a beautiful girl! I know how much you’ve been anticipating the birth, and what a surprise to find twins!! I wish I could’ve seen your expression when you discovered she had given birth, and then again when you saw there were TWINS! You and FD must be so proud, it’s all pretty amazing. Can’t wait to see more photos in the next weeks to come!!

    Like

    1. Baby Sister, I wish you could have seen my expression too, because all I remember was how my heart, stomach and brain felt the moment I saw TWO babies! Daisy is indeed beautiful, and nothing was better than capturing that moment of her with her little family, with the camera. I’m so proud of Daisy! Thank you and your little family, for all of the support and encouragement on this journey with Daisy. It has meant more to me than you know!

      Like

    1. Yes it is Phil. I’ll continue to update on Daisy. We’re trying to keep a bit of distance so she can perform her role as a mother now! I’m hopeful she can keep them safe until they’re stronger.

      Like

  8. Congratulations grandma! Twins and what gorgeous little twins they are to 🙂 What price a pair of socks? Nothing when you can get wonderful photos like daisy and her twins together. Gorgeous images and a wondeful way to start my morning off and my weekend to my daughters thank you so much for sharing your wonderful news 🙂

    Like

    1. Fran, you always tickle me! Those were old socks anyway! The camo pants were actually a new pair of scrubs that I bought recently. I needed something comfortable and lightweight for wear in the woods to protect me from poison ivy. These were perfect! I wasn’t about to snag them up in fence!

      Daisy’s fawns (now we know they are a buck and a doe) are beautiful! Reminds me so much of Daisy when she was a wee baby!

      Like

      1. I am almost as proud of her as you are! Her surrogate nan from Tassie sends love :). If she ever finds herself in this neck of the woods (er… no idea why but hey..what the heck!) she is completely welcome here on Serendipity Farm 🙂 You never know…the continents might just realign and we might be neighbours again! 😉

        Like

    1. As far as we can tell, all is well with Daisy. I saw her eating at the feeder this morning, but she seemed preoccupied and ran off after a short while. She headed to the area we last saw her with the twins. She’s eating for three now… so the fact that she was at the feeder this morning is a good sign! We just keep praying for her and the fawns protection until they gain strength and stamina. Than you for your well wishes.

      Like

  9. Oh my, that is exciting news indeed. I was SO HOPING that Daisy would come “home” to give birth but I kept my mouth shut for fear of jinxing that possibility (and I say I do not believe in such superstitions, lol). That is just too cool and now I am wondering what comes next. Will Daisy let you near her fawns? All kinds of things such as that are going through my mind now. Most of all, I am happy for you as I am sure that is what you wanted to happen. Wow, keep us posted (stupid thing to say as I know you will)! You must be in ecstasy now, Sundog!

    Like

    1. We had a feeling those last days of pregnancy that Daisy was going to have them just down the slope from the house, but then she changed her mind the last two days and started hanging out at Steve’s house! Steve is an animal lover so it’s all good. He’ll do what he can to protect them as well. Daisy picked a good spot, I think. We’re so proud of her!

      Like

    1. Oh, thanks Mike! I was just flabbergasted! She looks so beautiful in that picture… and she did it all alone! Those babies are precious too. They look so much like Daisy did when she came to us two years ago. And, FD determined last evening, that one is a doe and the other a little buck! He got to hold both of them (helping them follow Daisy down a steep embankment). I’m just so proud – I’m still busting with excitement!

      Like

      1. Lori, honestly, this is, and has been one of the coolest and most remarkable stories of my life time. I am overcome with joy and the sweet of it all is delicious. Congratulations! I would say your rehabilitative efforts were a smashing success.

        Like

        1. Mike, at the moment I am so filled with joy! I found Daisy in the neighbor’s backyard around 6:30 and she was nursing the little doe! I came inside around 7:00 to whip FD’s breakfast up quickly, and downloaded the photos. When FD left for work I grabbed the camera and seeing Daisy was grazing alone, I walked with her, gently speaking. We groomed each other (her licking my hands, arms and pants, and me rubbing her ears, scratching for ticks and petting her). She continued to graze, working her way back to the treeline, and then I heard her grunt! Up came the little buck! I got to photograph her nursing him, and they just now laid down together. Mike, it was just amazing and beautiful! It is indeed, the most remarkable experience I’ve ever had. I will be busy blogging today!! I am so very proud of Daisy… proud to be her mother… and so happy she’s sharing this experience of her motherhood with me!

          Like

  10. Oh, congratulations! How magical to have twins AND that the delivery went well AND that they all look so healthy. This summer will be full of stories. I can’t wait.

    Like

    1. Thank you Sandy! Daisy came by tonight and I got some “lovin” time in. She looks well, is healing nicely and other than favoring her right eye (I think she poked it or scratched it on something), she seems to be doing well. I am so very proud of her. She surprised us all… she just keeps being that miracle in my life!

      Like

    1. Thanks Anouchka! Those babies are very small, but just the same size Daisy was when she came to us. They are so precious. And Daisy is beautiful as ever. She seems to be doing well and healing nicely. I’m just so proud that she managed so much on her own.

      Like

  11. You might be interested to read of our native Red Deer which are rather larger in size than your White-Tailed Deer (funny as it covers far less ground given the size of Ireland) http://www.wilddeerireland.com/reddeer.html How are they all doing this morning? Also interesting that unlike your fawns the red deer fawns do not follow their mother for 2 weeks while the mother is off grazing the fawns are left lying in cover. More pics soon ya?

    Like

    1. Thanks Ena, and actually, over the last two years I have studied various deer all over the world. The Red Deer are magnificent!! I love the size and their exceptional coloring! And, Daisy is instinctively keeping her fawns separated, and often leaves them for a few hours, from what I can tell. If you’ll read the comment I just made to Mike, I was able to watch both fawns nurse in two separate areas about 2 hours apart this morning. Daisy was resting with the little buck when I finally walked away to give them time alone. I’d love to just camp out with them but I want to be respectful. And YES!!! I’ll be posting information and photos as soon as I can manage steady time at the computer!

      Like

  12. Oh, my gosh. I can feel your excitement – what an absolutely wonderful event, for you, for Daisy and the fawns, too. After all this, for you to have a pair of healthy twins to share with us is just marvelous. And how good of you not to hang around them all the time. I’d have a hard time with that, but they do need their “alone time”, too. I hope you’ve told Daisy how proud we all are of her!

    Like

    1. I have continued to tell Daisy what a sensation she is, and how proud we all are of her. She continues to need our attention. This morning she was grazing in the pastures, always on the lookout of course, and she really enjoyed the scratches and petting I was giving her. It can’t be easy having her job! Always on patrol (which she’s doing right now), feeding two babies which takes about an hour with feeding, cleaning and getting a little exercise and getting settled… and having very little time for herself. I’ve been bringing a bucket of water and her high-protein feed to her… wherever she happens to be grazing. We’re trying not to disturb her with the fawns. Generally, we stand way back and observe from afar.

      Like

  13. I’m having a difficult time coming up with words, Lori. I remember you saying one fawn is the way for the first time mothers. Exciting times, my friend, for sure! All the best to Daisy – and genuine congratulations to you two. She’s a wonderful lady deer and has you two to thank for bringing her up so wisely and compassionately.

    Like

    1. I’m having a difficult time writing, Sid! All of this excitement with Daisy and the twins is overwhelming. I’m quite emotional and so very proud of Daisy. I have got to sit down and write something… I know everyone is waiting patiently to hear about the past week. I will be sure to give Daisy a few pats from you… I DO tell her when my readers make comments just for her!

      Like

  14. Great news of Daisy and the fawns!! I have been following your blog since that post of yours which got freshly pressed and we could get a chance to meet her. It feels wonderful see her maturing with time.

    Like

    1. Oh, I remember well, Arindam! I acquired a handful of reader’s from that post that are still supportive today! Thank you for walking this journey with me. Daisy is so fortunate to have worldwide support! I am so proud of her. She has achieved so much, crossing paths with the human world, yet still, wild and free!

      Like

  15. OMG what a great story! Yay Daisy! I can’t believe you climbed over a barbed wire fence, if I tried that I’d probably still be stuck there. You are brave!

    Like

    1. Ha! Well, I was a bit vexed at getting hooked in the crotch AND the sock. However, I am a very practical and money-conscious person, so the sock lost out! Thank you for such a nice comment. Daisy continues to amaze us… we are very lucky to be her parents!

      Like

    1. Thanks! Yes, I thought I had more upper body strength to get myself “unstuck” but perhaps it’s the pommel horse-like routine that I lack finesse with… regardless, I’m not very swift about getting over tricky fences!

      Like

Comments are closed.