A Silver Lining To Every Storm…

When Oklahoma gets severe weather, it is often predicted a few days beforehand.  The local weather folks had warned us earlier in the week, that the dry line would set up in our area of the state, giving us some pretty fair chances of volatile weather.  I had planned to spend some time this afternoon, preparing for the weather that would surely arrive by early evening.  I wanted to be certain my plants were protected from hail, and make sure to put the vehicles, and anything else I could stash, in our storage building for safe cover.

IMG_6849My first duty of the day was to fix a hearty breakfast.  I do not usually indulge in a filling morning meal, but the instructions on the medication I was taking the past two days, required the tablets to be taken with food. For over a week, I had suffered with poison ivy rash.  Where and how I acquired it seemed to be a mystery.  The only idea I had was that I mowed two days in a fierce wind, perhaps mowing over a patch of poison ivy I did not know existed.  We do have poison ivy in the woods, but I had not been in that area by foot, and certainly this time of year I always wore jeans and boots for protection. When the rash first appeared, I could not imagine how I acquired it so extensively! Over the next several days it showed up in new places, spreading over my legs, buttocks, arms and chest.  It was as if I had literally rolled in the toxic weed!

And, being a person who prefers to try home remedies first, I tried a number of treatments to find an end to the incessant itching.  Finally, I gave in and went to the doctor. I couldn’t believe that I had succumbed to the urushiol oil produced by the plant after bragging for years that I was immune to this toxic plant (I had unknowingly pulled it up with bare hands in the past and had no reaction!).  I had never once suffered the consequences that 70 to 85 percent of the population does, when they come into contact with the ivy.  The doctor informed me there was no explanation as to why my number had finally come up.  The bottom line was that I had it, and I best figure out how I acquired it so that I could keep from experiencing this kind of misery again.

What a pretty, green plant poison ivy is... but the toxic oil it puts off can prompt weeks of miserable itching and swelling!
What a pretty, green plant poison ivy is… but the toxic oil it puts off can prompt weeks of miserable itching and swelling!

And, I had another aggravation on top of the horrible, red blotches and bumps that riddled my body.   The very same week I was exposed to poison ivy, I received a district jury summons.   I had never been called for jury duty and, call me crazy, I had always hoped to be asked. Each time family or friends were called to serve, I was a little jealous.  I wanted to do my civic duty!  And now that I was finally called, I was a miserable mess, scratching every part of my body and utterly unable to sit for very long periods of time.

Then, to top it off, as ugly as they were after a week of trying not to itch, the bumps developed into weeping blisters that oozed and itched all the more!  Just trying to find a comfortable position in which to sleep at night seemed impossible.  So, on the last day possible, I made an appointment to see the judge, as instructed on my summons, to see if I qualified to be relieved of my duty.  Taking one look at my angry red, weeping legs and blotchy, bumpy arms, the judge signed off, and I was dismissed from jury duty.

So this morning, I ate my open-faced, egg sandwich and took the Methylprednisolone tablets, choking them down with a full glass of water.  I gently rubbed the Betamethasone Valerate cream on all of the spots and rash patches.  I donned a pair of cargo shorts and a short-sleeved t-shirt and headed out to the already, sweltering heat.  The wind was blasting out of the south like a furnace.  Everything about this morning seemed to suggest a spring storm.

As usual, I got side-tracked from my “to do” list and started out picking up trash on the property since tomorrow would be the day the refuse truck empties our trash polycart. Our property borders an alley, where people often pitch trash.  Weekly, I travel the alley in my electric buggy to pick up the trashy b@$!@&#$ discards.  Needless to say, this is an aggravating task.  I do not understand why people just throw trash from a vehicle, or why some properties are riddled with household trash, left to blow around the neighborhood.

While driving down the alley, I stopped to visit my neighbor, Mrs. Perry.  Before I knew it, she was in the buggy with me.  I gave her a tour of our ten acres, and afterward, we sat on the back porch, having tea, talking about life.

By the time I delivered Mrs. Perry back to her home, it was lunch time, which meant time for two more pills and another application of poison ivy cream.  I would have to work non-stop if I was going to complete all that I had on my “to do” list!  By now, it was really hot and humid, and the wind was gusting fairly hard. Big cumulonimbus clouds were building in the southern sky.  Still, I managed all of my tasks by late afternoon and headed inside for a quick shower.  As I cleaned up, I remembered I also had cookies to bake for a friend. Baking on a hot day was not exactly appealing to me, but I had promised them, and bake them I would!

Just as my friend arrived to fetch the cookies, the sky let loose of the first rain drops.  The clouds were looking a bit threatening, so I hurried to take down the hummingbird feeders from the shepherd hooks and move the patio furniture to the back of the porch to keep it dry.  At the front porch, I removed the wicker chair cushions and pulled up the rugs.  By now the wind chimes were making a chaotic racket, so I removed them too.  The storm was moving in quickly!

Before long, the wind came slamming across the fields, bringing a torrent of rain and hail. Most of the hail was pea- and marble-sized, but it continuously pelted the earth, ripping leaves from the trees while the straight-line wind hurled it all against the house.  Most of my young fruit trees were completely bent to the ground in the sustained, high winds.  The rain was driving down in sheets and, at times, I could not even see the trees in the woods just behind the house!  The weather man on the local television station stated that our area had 60 to 70 mph winds.  What I was seeing out my windows, seemed more like a hurricane!

My first thought when weather is severe, especially when it involves hail and winds that can take down limbs and trees, is always about Daisy deer.  I had seen her hunker down in hail storms before.  Despite access to a dry room in the barn attached to her pen (with a roof over the entry, nonetheless, she would often lay down in the open, stoically braving the storm and enduring the hail, slamming rain, and wind.  This evening, I said a prayer for Daisy’s safety and for the protection of all of the woodland animals and birds.

It was nearly dark by the time three different storm cells completed their trek through the area.  Afterwards, I grabbed the high-beam flashlight and headed out to check out the storm damage.  The south side of the house was plastered with leaves.  My beautiful flowers were beaten to the ground, ripped by the wind and splattered with mud.  Looking across the pasture, I noticed branches down from trees, and one big, old elm tree that had lost large limbs, which landed on our pasture fence.  Several pieces of sheet metal from a garage in the alley lay askew in our pasture.  In the distance, I heard the wail of city sirens and, in just a short time, chain saws began to buzz as the sounds of traffic picked up. Obviously, there was city-wide damage from the storm.  I would have my work cut out for me tomorrow!

Daisy comes to me after the rainstorm.
Daisy comes to me after the rainstorm.

As I plodded back to the house, shoes squishing along the path to the woods, I shone my flashlight into the darkness below.  I hoped I would not see a lot of damage in the woods. I had worked so hard this past winter, after all, clearing brush and fallen limbs while keeping the burn pile stoked.  I scanned the area slowly, looking for downed limbs or trees, and then… there SHE was!  There was the orange collar… and the brown body with the scraggly winter coat!  Daisy had weathered the storm, and had come home to nibble corn at the feeder.

For once, Daisy did not wait for me to come to her, or cautiously sniff my hand before she was sure it was me.  This time she seemed to know… to want her human mother.  She walked to me, and I walked to her.  For a long time, she licked my arms and neck (the parts that didn’t have poison ivy ointment on them!) and she let me scratch her and pick ticks off of her.  I petted her and spoke with her. I put my hand on her belly, hoping to feel a kick or movement from the little fawn she was carrying… and I DID feel movement!!   For about an hour I stood with her. We watched an armadillo rooting nearby, and twice we sent a raccoon packing who seemed intent on feeding on Daisy’s corn and deer chow.

Daisy would eat a bit and then come to me, seeming to want more attention. Her demeanor reminded me of the old days, when she would lay with me and allow me to love on her.  Finally, when I became cold and the mosquitoes began attacking me, I bid her farewell.  Oh, it was so hard to leave her! As I climbed the slope, I shone my flashlight on her as she moved to a nearby tree branch to nibble new shoots, enjoying the tender leaves. A little while later, I went out on the back porch and my flashlight found Daisy grazing in the pasture just south of the house.

I was so happy that my Daisy had come home after the terrible storm!  For that hour I spent with her, I did not once think of my itching, or of the damage to the woods and the property.  I did not hear the noises of the city. I was aware of my humanness, yet I did not want to be.  I was in Daisy’s world… in the night. I longed to be more to her, at that moment, than the human mother that I was. And yet, it appeared, that I was enough for her just as I was. It seemed not to matter to her that I was different… that I was a human. She was content to have my company, and to walk with me.  I was elated that she came home, and that she allowed me to “mother” her like I used to.  Daisy’s presence was a gift to me tonight.  She is, has always been, and shall always be, the silver lining to every storm in my life…

© Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…

The following photos were taken one rare morning recently when Daisy came to feed during daylight hours.  She spent about an hour roaming around, nibbling plants and trees.  She stopped occasionally to allow me to pet her, pick ticks off of her and rub her ears and face. This time of year, she is particularly itchy, as she sheds her winter coat, and her new, lighter summer coat comes in.  After a time, she slowly made her way deep into the woods, heading back to an area she used to bed down in during the daylight hours when she was just a fawn.

Springtime offers new shoots of leaves on various trees and shrubs. Deer are not the only mammals that find nourishment in the young buds!
Springtime offers new shoots of leaves on various trees and shrubs. Deer are not the only mammals that find nourishment in the young buds!
Another pose showing Daisy's growing belly.
Another pose showing Daisy’s growing belly.
This spot just south of our house, along the canyon rim is one of Daisy's favorite spots to nibble fresh hackberry tree leaves!
This spot just south of our house, along the canyon rim is one of Daisy’s favorite spots to nibble fresh hackberry tree leaves!
Daisy stands atop the ridge of the canyon slope, looking back to see if I'll follow.
Daisy stands atop the ridge of the canyon slope, looking back to see if I’ll follow.
Daisy stops to "catch scent" in the morning breeze.
Daisy stops to “catch scent” in the morning breeze.
There is always something good to eat in the in the woods!
There is always something good to eat in the in the woods!
IMG_7876
Daisy’s belly looks round and full at this angle, with the morning sun dappling through the woodland trees.
The woodland grasses are getting tall now. Soon Daisy will find a place to deliver her little fawn.
The woodland grasses are getting tall now. Soon Daisy will find a place to deliver her little fawn.

72 thoughts on “A Silver Lining To Every Storm…

  1. Sorry to hear about the rash and that ‘tornado alley’ weather starting for you already – – but really enjoyed the pics and story of Daisy! 🙂

    Like

    1. Thank you Tamrah! I do love the Oklahoma weather, but it does cause some damage. Most of the time the Oklahoma City TV stations cover the storms very well, and technology allows much more warning so that we can be prepared… sometimes days in advance!

      Daisy came up again this evening. I walked with her for two hours! She is still a week or maybe 3 weeks from delivering her fawn. I wonder if she’s establishing her birthing territory (what does do about a month in advance) keeping the other does out. She is probably spending her days in the woods near here. Now that I have gotten poison ivy, I’m not so likely to go back in the woods looking for her!

      Like

      1. My son was born the day after the Limon, Colorado tornado hit us. That same month, my brother was in Oklahoma working on a harvest crew during tornado season – I have issues with tornadoes…LOL
        But, in all fairness, F5’s make poison ivy look tame, eh?

        I’ve followed the Daisy story – what a line to walk between wanting to protect and standing back far enough to allow freedom of individuality..
        🙂
        The pearls of wisdom are everywhere, eh?
        🙂

        Like

        1. Pearls of wisdom, indeed! Daisy has been my greatest teacher.

          No question about trading a tornado for poison ivy. This is my 3rd week actually, with the rash. I wrote this post a couple of weeks ago, but just now got photos inserted and my editor to look it over. I hope I never get into poison ivy again. But now the excitement of severe weather?? Yep, I love it! I don’t like to see damage, but I sure enjoy an exciting storm every once in a while!

          Like

          1. I’ve driven through white -out blizzards, etc., but I was 9 months pregnant and driving 40 miles cross country to work a graveyard shift when the Limon Tornado hit – I realized later it could have been right behind me and I wouldn’t have known it – so since then, not so into summer storms! 😀

            Like

          2. Oh, I don’t blame you! Now a blizzard and white-outs are what scare me. Nothing can be seen… even the hand in front of your face! I experienced a few of those in Nebraska. We don’t have those down here… at least not in the 23 years I’ve lived here!

            Like

    1. Thank you, Mike! I knew you would be excited to see Daisy. I walked for about 2 hours with her tonight. I felt the baby kick again. This is simply amazing… I wish everyone could have this experience. There just aren’t words sometimes.

      Like

      1. I wonder if she won’t return to you for the birth, knowing how well you nurtured her. Really Lori, this is one of the sweetest things ever. Your Daisy story needs a larger audience. What a great children’s book you have here. May I save the picture of you two?

        Like

        1. Thank you Mike, and yes, you may enjoy the photo. I think about a book, and then I get overwhelmed. It would be wonderful just to have someone “discover” the story… I love to write and photograph, but publishing seems a mammoth project!

          Like

          1. I too am waiting to be discovered. Your story needs to be. Think in terms of someone reading your story to a group of children, and then write it as someone would read it aloud.

            Like

  2. Things are getting really exciting at your place, Lori! Lovely and a bit scary too. I was wondering if someone was burning in your neighborhood on the day you got your poison ivy rash. My brother broke out as a kid like that when the foothills caught on fire. Seems the oil can travel in the smoke and he got it real bad. Do you recall any smoke that day? So glad that you are documenting Daisy’s visits. Its fun to see how she has changed over the past few months! 😉

    Like

    1. Thank you Lynda. Well, since I don’t know what day, how, or when I got into it, I can’t say if there was a fire in the area. I think someone was burning recently, but nothing nearby. We are actually the only people out of city limits in the area that can burn. I still feel I probably mowed over a patch of it and the wind caught it. The wind was really up a couple of days that I mowed.

      It is exciting to see how Daisy is changing. Her milk bag is beginning to show. We have also felt the baby kick, which is pretty exciting. Daisy has been showing up most evenings around 8:00 or 9:00. Tonight she was here early and I managed to walk with her for 2 hours. She is marking the pasture with urine, so we’re wondering if she’s establishing our place as her birthing territory. White-tail does run off other deer about a month before they give birth. I’ll have to clue everyone in about the actual process. It’s highly interesting!

      Like

  3. Luckily we don’t have poison ivy here – it sounds dreadful. What a shame you’ve succumbed to the toxin. Daisy must be such a joy in your life and soon to bring more!

    Like

    1. Oh, Daisy IS a joy! She came by tonight. She seemed interested in playing with FD. She leaps around, jumps backward, wriggles her head around (I call it “crazy head”), and shimmies sideways! We had not seen her do that in months. She is as sweet as ever. Very loving while she’s grooming me (licking my arms, neck and chest) and she seems to enjoy her human parents. Life is just pretty darned good!

      Like

  4. Sorry about your run in with poison ivy. That stuff can be brutal! Since I am a severe weather follower, if high winds and large hail occurred where I lived, I would be out taking pictures and video! I also loved seeing Daisy Deer again. She will be a mother real soon!

    Like

    1. Oh Nathan, you reminded me about your storm-chasing! I read about that in your blog! I find the spring storms exciting, but I’m not as courageous as you… out there in the storms or following them around! You be safe out there on your adventures!!

      I was so happy to get some daytime photos of Daisy. She’s generally here in the evenings, about dark time, so photographing her isn’t so good then. I felt the fawn kick again last night and we noticed Daisy’s milk bag is showing now. It won’t be long. It would be cool to photograph the birth as a quiet bystander. If she has her fawn in the woods I probably won’t risk contracting poison ivy again! LOL

      Like

  5. Daisy’s coming home to have her baby. Home where she feels loved and cared for. That says so much about the love and care you and FD have had for her. It’s wonderful that you will be able to share in this miraculous event with her.

    Like

    1. Barbara, you understand how truly amazing it is that Daisy has managed so much in the wild, having been raised by human parents. I think it is even more amazing that she continues to seek us out from time to time. For me, it is an especially emotional issue. Not being able to have children of my own, I was given this very special gift to fulfill some of my nurturing skills, and to experience a deeper sense of love… not with communication, but with nurturing and feeling. I believe you understand why she is here. Don’t we all come home to feel love and comfort? Thank you for your kind comment. That made me feel so good!

      Like

  6. Oh, Lori! Poison ivy is the worst! Those oozy, crusty sores and the itch! You have my full and complete sympathy.
    I love how Daisy comes back to you for comfort.

    Like

    1. Hmm, sounds like you have suffered with that horrid weed rash too! LOL Thank goodness I am finally feeling better today. Last night was the first night I slept well with no itching!

      Daisy has been showing up most evenings lately. It almost seems like old times. She even played around jumping and jostling with FD last night. It was funny to watch a very pregnant Daisy kicking up like a young fawn! I’m so proud of her. It makes me fairly emotional these days to think of her managing to be a wild deer, yet keep her bond with her human parents.

      Like

    1. Thank you Fran! Some weeks can be uneventful, and then WHAMMO… excitement galore! I am really enjoying Daisy’s visits. I’m trying to be patient about her delivering a fawn soon. I worry of course, too.

      Like

      1. Imagine how amazing it will be to see them both together and you know what? I think she is returning to “home” to have her baby :). Don’t be surprised to be there when she delivers it 😉

        Like

          1. Is everything O.K. in your neck of the wood? We have been hearing some terrible things about Oklahoma on the news and both Steve and I were getting worried about you :(.

            Like

          2. Thank you so much for your concern. Moore, Oklahoma is about an hour away from us. The thing was, we were coming home from Nebraska yesterday afternoon. I was watching the storms on the iPad. We left early in order to try to avoid running into bad weather and knew we’d be cutting it close. As we were headed south, just north of Moore, I saw the storms forming on radar. FD and I made the decision to reroute west in hopes of avoiding the line of storms. We’d considered going on the normal route south (where the tornado hit) thinking the storms would move out by the time we got to the Moore/Oklahoma City area. But then, FD said even though this route took us way out of the way, it would be better than getting pelted with hail, which has been happening a lot in the last weeks. Hail and strong winds have been bad. Fran, we would have been driving through the worst of it on the south side at that very time had we continued. That massive storm lingered for an hour, just grinding away at the city of Moore, demolishing everything in its path.

            Thanks to everyone for thoughts and prayers for the people of Oklahoma. It means so much.

            Like

          3. We generally watch the weather this time of year. May is the biggest month for tornadoes, so we keep an eye out for storms. And, the weather people can usually tell us a day or two in advance if conditions will be prime for tornadoes and hail. Like many people, we do not have a storm shelter to go to. I wish they made them more affordable for folks in this area. We really need them.

            Like

          4. Time to start digging methinks! A bit like us with the dry summers we are now getting, time to get a water tank. I agree, it’s hard to afford these things but I think that we all really need to find a way or at least find someplace where you can go if you have to because that was a really scary reminder of just how terrifying nature can be. Why can’t your county create a communal shelter underground? It would be a very wise thing to do with tornado’s happening on a regular basis.

            Like

          5. I questioned this year’s ago when I worked in town and had to come up with a disaster evacuation plan for our building. There is no shelter in this entire city (population approximately 7K). A few folks have storm shelters or small basements. Our soil here is mostly sand rock, which poses it’s own problems. It’s impossible to have a basement without water seepage. We have heard of folks who actually drowned in their shelters from water that filled in during flooding (another aspect of tornadoes). A container of some sort would work best. I’m sure at some point we will put a shelter in on the slope behind our home. We have drainage problems up top, so an in-ground shelter up top isn’t feasible due to water problems. We may have to research what type of shelter would work best there.

            Like

          6. An underground shipping container might be the go? Especially on a slope. I heard about people drowning as well. I am just glad that less people died than was originally reported. We don’t get tornadoes here and the Cyclones that hit the top end of Australia just don’t come down this far because of our cooler weather. I would be a nervous wreck in May if I lived in Oklahoma! Same goes for if I lived in San Francisco on the San Andreas Fault!

            Like

          7. We have small earthquakes here, which I find exciting. I’m not sure that I’d enjoy the kind they have in California though! I will see what kind of situation we’re looking at with a slope shelter. It seems doable, and I’m sure we have all sorts of options… even creative ones!

            So, do you have any kind of scary weather or conditions where you live?

            Like

          8. Not really, Aside from Tasmania being completely comprised of an extinct volcanic range (hopefully “extinct” means completely dead! 😉 )

            Like

  7. Beautiful Daisy!
    We never have quite such severe weather here in England, nor do we have Poison Ivy. I was gripped by your story, and wish I could see you on Google Earth. Hope you are itch & rash free soon xxx
    Moss Piglet

    Like

      1. Oh thank you Evelyn!! Sandy is indeed, a wonderful and loving friend. She has been very encouraging to me, and often has just the right advice to offer when I need it most. I hope to see her again when she comes to visit family in Oklahoma. I hope to see her neck of the woods someday too! I just need to slip on those traveling shoes of mine and GO!!!

        Like

    1. Evelyn, I am feeling much better today. Last night was the first night in nearly 3 weeks that I did not have incessant itching! What a wonderful night’s sleep I had!

      I always find it interesting how different parts of the world have such varied climate and weather patterns. I do love the excitement of these storms. One just never knows what they can bring!

      Like

  8. It is typical that when bad things happen, they happen all at the same time. I had to giggle a little reading this post, because situations like these seem to arise often in my life. But if the pain and rashes were uncomfortable, I bet it was worth it for that precious hour with Daisy 🙂

    Like

    1. Thank you Rachel. I was surprised and so happy about Daisy’s arrival that night. She has always appeared at the times I needed her most. Sometimes I’ll just be wondering about her after she’s been gone a week or two, and there she will be. I wonder if this is how it is for the animals… reading energy or “knowing”. I have found that often in life, there is a silver lining to every situation if only we look for it. Sometimes it is not so apparent or immediate, but it’s there!

      Like

      1. I will bear the thought of a silver lining in mind the next time something goes a bit wrong. All I need now is my own Daisy deer! 🙂

        Like

        1. Well, keep thinking along those lines, Rachel. I think if you are open to a deer, then at some point you will have such an experience! The silver lining is always there for us to consider. And, it does a heart good to think about the positive gleaned in every situation.

          Like

  9. Lori, I’m SO thrilled to hear that Daisy came and spent time with you, allowing you the supreme gift of feeling her baby move in her belly! I think this is a sign that she really will be bringing her baby to meet you. I just cannot wait to see it.

    And I love Mike’s suggestion of making Daisy’s story into a children’s book. I know how you resist suggestions of writing and publishing an adult book about her, but this idea seems much more do-able, don’t you think? (I think that we’re all going to wear you down with our continual pressures to publish…tee hee. And if we do, I’ll be the first one in line to get your signature in your beautiful book!)

    Like

    1. Hmm, I might just have to fly my wonderful blogger friends here for a personal book signing and hoof print!! Daisy isn’t fond of crowds but she is the curious type so she might show up! Oh, Kim, I’m giving it some thought. Perhaps my editor (and co-editor too) need to get together and discuss this. Thank you for all of your encouragement, Kim. I wish I had your energy and confidence!

      Like

      1. xoxo

        You can do it. And just think, a book tour where you do readings to kids….how much fun would that be? And that’s not nearly as scary as reading to adults.

        Like

  10. Just another theory on the poison ivy! My outdoor/indoor cat has given me that stuff before. We have a lot of hedgerows that surround fields and it is full of poison ivy. Mike loves to spend time in them then he gets in my lap and BINGO – I have the stuff. I also have gotten it by mowing up against the hedgerows when the wind is blowing so ya never know. On the other hand, I think it jumps on me if I come within 10 feet of the stuff. I am really sorry to hear of your bout with the stuff as it can certainly drive you crazy.

    On a more positive note, I am glad to hear that Daisy is hanging around. I know how she has touched your life and now the lives of many others through your blog. Please keep us posted! BTW, those are some great pictures of her.

    I hope you feel better soon.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much Louis! I have wondered if perhaps the poison ivy could have come from Daisy. I realized last summer that deer EAT poison ivy! Who knew? However, since the worst of it is on my legs, I would say this did not come from my girl.

      I’m glad you enjoyed the photos of Daisy. She’s never been camera shy, and she has a real love for camera straps! Anything is game for nibbling, you know!

      Like

  11. Your life has its up and downs, but I’m willing to bet you wouldn’t trade it for anything, right?
    Be well, my lovely friend.
    You’re one of my personal real-life heroes.

    Like

    1. Thank you, Hook! You have that right… I wouldn’t trade my life. And, yes, I am on the mend and feeling all kind of froggy today! I love this kind of energy. Another silver lining to being under the weather for several days… the positive vibes return and I’m ready to roll! I hope some day my traveling shoes take me to meet you and your entertaining world. Great day to you, Hook!

      Like

    1. Thanks, my friend! Poison ivy is a toxic plant that puts off an oil that causes a terrible rash. I have always been careful to avoid it as we have quite a bit of it on our property, mostly in the woodlands. I am feeling much better this week. Did you know deer EAT poison ivy?

      Like

      1. Thanks for your answer and explanation my dear. I didn’t know that deers eat it.
        I was wondering if nothing wrong happened to you, because we have heard of the terrible storm and its damage. Take care my dear friend.
        .

        Like

  12. Just running back by to sigh over the deer pictures again. Adorable Daisy. I love the way deer sniff the air. We watch a couple of groups – one is on the back/security wilderness of NASA grounds, but they often graze in the meadow there or you can spot them on the edge of the woods along the NASA employees jogging trail in the compound. Those are some lucky deer.
    Hope the storms ( and your itching) have calmed down – hate poison ivy! Once my mom had it so bad she even had it internally. UGH (she was allergic to so much stuff – but they said once you have a bad case, you will be more sensitive to it the next time! So be careful!)

    Like

    1. Thank you, and I have heard that once exposed, a person is always susceptible to poison ivy. It would help if I knew where I got it, but I suppose I’ll just have to be proactive about it, regardless. As for Daisy, I continue to be amazed with her. She’s been visiting nightly now.

      Like

  13. By now you can likely predict what I’ll say in reaction to your lovely post, Lori. What a gift you and Daisy are to each other. If only everyone had at least some of your perspective about nature and all who reside in it!

    Also – while I don’t have any desire to live in your part of the world (too hot, too many tornadoes!), I would pay to see an armadillo. I mean, to this northern city dweller, how cool is that?

    Like

    1. Well Sid, that does it! I got some great armadillo photographs in the winter months and a few this spring. In fact, the night of the storm in this post, a wee armadillo came right up to my leg, sniffed in the air and decided I was dangerous, and shot off into the woods, hurling himself in the weeds! He was so cute!! I will do a post on armadillos just for you!!

      Like

Comments are closed.