Call of the Wild… The Weird and Wonderful Experience of Wildlife Rehabilitation

A dehydrated woodland moth that was brought to us simply needed a little water and some respite in the cool of the house overnight. It took flight mid-morning the next day.

I have been a licensed wildlife rehabilitator for the State of Oklahoma for a little over a year now.  While I have always loved animals and sought to help the orphaned and injured, I never dreamed I would one day be active in helping wildlife in such a manner.  At the time I applied for my license, I thought, naively, that I was simply making what I had done all along, legal.  I had to, after all; Daisy deer had shown up motherless… and I couldn’t very well hide raising a deer when I lived on the outskirts of town.  It is one thing to raise birds and a few squirrels, but quite another to keep a deer without gaining some attention.

This is a juvenile robin with an injured wing, that we acquired this summer. We eventually transported this fledgling to Wildcare of Oklahoma. Often when an injury is far beyond my knowledge and care, I transport to Wildcare. Providing the bird/animal the best chance at recovery is always first on my mind.

Filling out the application to attain a license to rehabilitate animals was fairly simple.  But right off the bat, I saw that we were going to need to spiff things up around here!  Accompanying the application was a facility inspection form that the local game warden must fill out and sign before our operation could become official. Once we had everything ready, I would have to call the warden and make an appointment for him to meet with us to do his inspection.

To gain the warden’s signature, we needed to demonstrate that we were capable of housing the animals we hoped to help, and show that we were prepared to take whatever species might be brought to us.  So, I took inventory of what we already had on hand to house small mammals and birds, and FD and I worked to clean up an enclosed pen area we could use for an aviary.  We also took advantage of the offer from family to come from Dallas to help us whip the old barn into shape so we could use it for housing larger mammals.  We purchased materials and built two large pens to provide space for the larger mammals, such as Daisy deer, to roam.  We took inventory of feed and water buckets, pee pads, blankets, heating pads, syringes and formulas.  And then we cleaned and repaired some old cages. There was so much to do!

My sister in Nebraska called me about an injured bird in their town park. After she emailed me this great, detailed photo of the bird, I was able to identify it as a juvenile Green Heron. My sister was able to contact the Nebraska State Game and Parks division, who dispatched someone to pick up this feisty fighter. The heron was none too impressed by the department employees efforts to help it, and managed a good stabbing injury on the transporter! One must always be careful when transporting any wildlife, cute as they may seem!

After all our work, still nothing prepared me for the day the warden arrived!  I had tried to contact him for a couple of weeks, and became discouraged each time a tentative plan to meet fell through.  Making my last call to the warden, I again mentioned my itinerary for the week and asked if we could try to work out a time once again.  This time, he showed up bright and early the very next morning – without warning!  From the front windows in our living room, I watched this intimidating figure step out of his official-looking truck.  He was talking on his cell phone.  He had his game warden uniform on, and was wearing sunglasses with those darned reflective lenses.  My heart was pounding.  I just hoped and prayed this would all go quickly.  And, of all things, I was in my worn-out work jeans, complete with holes in the knees, and topped off with a ratty, camouflage t-shirt.  I wore no makeup and my hair was askew in a haphazard ponytail – I hoped I didn’t look, or smell, too much like a hillbilly!

It took me more than a day to discover just what these ugly orphaned birds were! They became beautiful Eurasian Collared Doves and in a month’s time were released to the wild. They hung about our elm and pecan trees most of the summer before taking flight to the south one day. I always wonder if the collared doves we see around our property are either one or both of them!

As I walked out the front door to greet my visitor, I noticed the warden was still on his phone, and he was not smiling.  He sounded official and stern, and his conversation seemed terse.  I tried to calm my hammering heart, hoping I didn’t get a darned nose-bleed!  That had happened a few times in my life when anxiety got the best of me.  While I waited for him to end the phone call, I got busy opening up the door to the building that housed the cages and supplies.  Having something to do always calmed my nerves.  Finally, Tyler introduced himself as his eyes scanned our property.

I had no way of knowing what Tyler was looking at, or what he looked like behind those reflective sunglasses.  He appeared to be in his early 30’s maybe, but every spoken word exuded confidence and maturity beyond that age.  He apologized for not making it by any of the earlier times we had designated.  As he explained more about what was on his agenda as of late, I realized the importance of his job.  I felt humbled.  Some wanna-be-rehabber lady getting her panties in a wad over a missed appointment or two was the last thing on his list of concerns. The previous two weeks had seen him working on deer poaching cases with another county game warden.  They had been putting in some long hours to catch the crooks.  Hearing about this, my maternal instincts fired up hot.  Little, orphaned fawn, Daisy, nestled safely behind the living room couch, was a hunted and sought after species.  I hated poachers with a passion.  Being a deer mother made me ferocious about protecting her.

Flying lessons began in the house. Our shoulders were the favorite landing sites, and FD was sure to get a good beard preening and mustache pecking from time to time!

The inspection went smoothly once Tyler and I began visiting.  He made it rather easy on me.  He asked a lot of questions about “what if” scenarios.  At first I was alarmed his inquisition was part of the inspection.  I worried I would flunk or say the wrong thing; after all, I didn’t have a lot of experience.  Finally, I realized his questions were more about discovering what mammals I was interested in, what experience I had caring for various kinds of wildlife, and what my plans were to release my charges back into the wild.  On a final note, he assured me that his concerns mainly revolved around the ability to do what I could, within reason, to offer wildlife a chance. He stated there were no expectations; no right or wrong decisions.  Simply put, just having someone to rely on, to be available to help, was the only criteria he looked at. I realized too, that he was a caring person, often having taken in a critter or two himself, to eventually have a chance back in the wild.

Lucky Duck (right) was someone’s Easter duckling dumped off at a city lake. FD’s daughter spotted the lady who discarded the little ducking, and rescued Lucky. We acquired Happy Duck (left) as a companion to Lucky. Eventually, fox activity on our property caused us to transport Happy and Lucky to a city park where they were protected and cared for. Did you know ducks and geese should be fed cracked corn or duck feed instead of bread? Bread is a horrible “filler” that expands their stomachs and provides little nutritional value.

FD and I have made many discoveries along the way about animal rehabilitation.  There is no right or wrong way to handle a situation.  One does what they can.  Sometimes the effort leads to a successful release, and sometimes death is eminent. No training is required, but self-education is encouraged, as well as developing a network with other rehabbers, in order to gain knowledge and support.  I have learned that there is no request that is weird or stupid.

This summer I rehabbed a large woodland moth that was brought to me.  At first it appeared nearly dead.  Providing an overnight stay in a cooler atmosphere with available water, had my friend flying free, into the woods by mid morning.

Birds of all sorts are our most common patients.  Some need a day or two, or maybe a week off from flying to give time for an injured wing to heal.  Fledglings often need a bit of nourishment to keep up flight.  One particular robin brought to me, was discovered by a couple of boys who found it tangled  in some briars.  Sewing thread was wrapped tightly around its leg and a stick pin was also lodged in it’s leg.  After snipping away the loose thread, and leaving the embedded thread where flesh had surrounded it, the thrashing bird was set free.  It was a simple fix that allowed the boys to see and understand how trash and debris that humans discard can get an animal in trouble, or even kill it.

This is one of my favorite photos of Frosty and FD. Frosty was always curious and often supervised the mixing of his formula! Frosty was a successful “soft” release. He spent a month going back and forth from the porch (safe and semi-protected) to the woodlands. Eventually, he ventured far into the woods… and returned a few times over the past years for surprise visits!
These sweet sister squirrels were thrown from their nest in a violent storm. I had no idea how long they had been exposed to the extreme heat that day. Though they looked perfectly healthy in this photo, one had internal injuries and the other was lethargic and didn’t squirm about as they normally would. Both refused hydration and died just hours later. I felt myself a failure and questioned my capabilities as a rehabber. I did some research and found similar stories from other rehabbers… sometimes we never know about injuries sustained in a fall. Time is often of the essence with survival.

Most of my rehabilitation work revolves around taking phone calls. I am listed in a few directories online and also with the State of Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.  Many times, word of mouth is my reference.  I am the person who gets the call, “What do I do with this bird?  It’s injured and in my yard”.  I am always a bit amused at what people might know or say about a bird.  Some people can recite exactly what type of bird they have, what appears to be wrong with it, and can tell me what they have done thus far to help it.  Others, give only scant details and just want the intruder out of their yard.  One lady told me, “I think it’s a mean bird.  It has a beak and, instead of using it to eat, it keeps attacking me when I’m trying to help it!  I really think it probably fell from the sky and hit its head.  It just seems very angry!”

Harold was a special case Mourning Dove with a neck injury. We worried he would never live a normal life, but eventually he healed and his neck righted itself. He turned out to be a SHE and frequented our backyard for many years!

I have found that even though I might not be able to help them with the bird or animal myself, since I don’t make house calls or transport from other areas, often the mere act of listening and offering more information will handle the call.  Sometimes I can locate a larger rehabilitation facility that cares for specific species or injuries.  Sometimes, I might help them find a facility nearer their home location.  Other situations require calling the county game warden in their area, since removing the animal might be dangerous to the caller.  Most of the time though, simply offering some words of encouragement and helping find a solution is enough.

This summer the effects of the drought caused most of the calls I received.  Numerous people discovered birds that appeared exhausted, camped out in their backyards.  When no injuries were noted, I often asked if there was shade in the yard and, if not, instructed them to put something out to provide a bit of shade.  I also suggested  setting a pan of water in the shade.  Most all concerned people called back to say that, after a bit of respite from the heat and some hydration, the bird flew off.  It is a wonderful thing to hear the joy and elation from someone who took a little time to perform a simple act of kindness, and saved a little (or big) bird.

Daisy deer wandered the canyon area just beyond the slope below our house for two days before we gave up on her mother. It was the beginning of a wonderful journey!
Holly (background) was hit by a vehicle November 2011. Head trauma and a hip injury took about a month to heal, and eventually Daisy (foreground) and Holly were able to share a pen. We had hoped they would stay together once released after hunting season. After a week, Holly took off on her own. We feel she may have returned to her original herd which would be about 25 miles from here as the crow flies. Daisy has always remained near her birth area, and shares both life in the wild with a herd of her own kind, and her “people” herd!

I often marvel at how this same scenario comes up in our own, every-day, human lives.  We all know or meet someone who just needs a bit of attention.  Maybe they need encouragement, or a little help with something.  It takes so little for us to smile, to offer a greeting, or assist someone who is struggling.  Some of these experiences may seem weird and strange, and they may even require a little more effort than we initially thought about giving.  But the wonder and amazement of how giving just that bit of recognition and offer of respite or help, provides the most rewarding feeling in the world.  A simple act of kindness, I believe, is perhaps the greatest form of love there is!

Daisy has grown into a beautiful yearling. This month marks the start of her first rutting season. Perhaps a year from now she will be a mother with her own little fawn to care for and teach the ways of the wild.

© Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…


64 thoughts on “Call of the Wild… The Weird and Wonderful Experience of Wildlife Rehabilitation

  1. This is a beautiful post! I love that you rehabilitated a dehydrated moth! Was that a first? I’ve loved helping out stunned birds, and once a squirrel as a compassionate friend who does energy healing, lots of companion animals, and of course lifting insects out of water! Thanks for sharing the wide variety of wildlife whom receive your care – interacting with deer must be such a gift.

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    1. Thanks for your kind words, Pachamama! Yes, the moth was a first for me. I just had an intuitive feeling I should offer cool respite and water. Being able to help Holly and Daisy deer was just amazing! Daisy continues to teach us about wildlife and respect of their ways. I would be interested in hearing more about energy healing. Could you offer any links to websites where I might learn more about it?

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  2. We drained our pool a little over a month ago and there was a dead squirrel that somehow got into the bottom, where some water was left. It wasn’t enough water to drown it..I don’t know if it died of a heart attack from fear or what.. Well, the very next day another squirrel was in it, but alive..running around in circles frantically. I was able to get the squirrel out with a pool net..he wasn’t afraid of me more than he was the fact he was stuck in the pool. He had a hard time because the metal pole wasn’t good for him to grip on to..but he finally made it. During the process, he would look up at me and cry..I felt so bad for the little guy! I noticed your pic of the little squirrel on the shoulder..how do you guys get them to be so tame with you? When the squirrel came out of the pool..he cowered on the ground. I approached him slowly with a towel i was going to lay over him because he was cold, but he ran.

    A week later, we were sitting on the patio and we heard this clunking sound…we looked over, and a squirrel was walking around our back yard carrying a plastic peanut butter jar with him! It was so funny! Then, a group of chipmunks stole it from him and were running around in the yard playing with it, running inside of it and making it roll around the yard like a hamster in a hamster ball!

    The squirrels also love pushing each other on the hammock swing. They’re so funny to watch!

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    1. Lyn, we raised Frosty from an infant so he bonded with us as parents. It’s not recommended to do this as rehabilitators, but it happens, and in Frosty’s case, he acclimated to the wild just fine. He lives two doors down from us, and we’re fairly sure it’s him with his stubbed tail and white hair growing out the end. Frosty lost part of his tail to frostbite (before we got him). Squirrels are a joy to observe. We have several that hang out down at the deer feeder and water station. They are hilarious. Frosty was fun to have in the house… until he started nibbling on things. Squirrel teeth grow about 6 inches a year, so they constantly gnaw on things. Squirrels make for excellent entertainment!

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  3. I enjoyed this posting very much. Miss not reading your wonderful experiences and posting. I can;t wait to hear someday Daisy comes home with her own family.

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    1. Oh, Charla, I’m glad you enjoyed this post! I hope to be able to write more this winter. There is so much to tell everyone. And, FD got me a wonderful gift of a camo jacket and matching pants! Now I can venture into the woods to do more wildlife photography this winter!

      Who knows?? Maybe by May I’ll have a Granddeer!! Wouldn’t that be amazing?

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  4. Lovely blog entry! I share your compassion and love of animals, I find that far and few between in our world, people just appreciate the beauty of these animals!

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    1. I completely agree with you that not enough people appreciate wildlife of all sorts. Just the mention of human trash and discards injuring and killing wildlife makes me sad. We often kill what is considered a nuisance and in our way. In this part of the midwestern US it is common to kill skunks, oppossums, raccoons, snakes and some birds because they are considered pests and some are thought to carry rabies. Most of the time these critters are just trying to survive in the world as we are. I try to respect their wanderings on our land. There are kind ways of helping animals to relocate if they do pose a problem in an area.

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  5. I love knowing how you became the Lady of the Wood. I can’t help but think the boys who brought you the tangled robin now pay more attention to how they dispose of trash. Have you ever given talks to school kids or local organizations? I can just imagine first-graders *loving* pictures of Daisy and hearing her story.

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    1. Sandy, I love your suggestion about talking to kids at school. Gosh, that would be a big step for me! I’m so nervous in crowds… but this idea is very tempting! It would be a great way to get word out about caring for animals and being aware of ways we can help wildlife in our communities. Thank you for this excellent suggestion. What an awesome idea!

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  6. Hi – After not having seen a post from you for awhile…this is timely. We just had an injured sandhill crane in our front yard. Our humane society picked him up but unfortunately they were unable to rehabilitate him. But I was so impressed by how gently and kindly they handled the bird when they came to pick him up. Love your blog.

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    1. Thank you, Shelley! I too have been amazed at how other rescues and rehabilitation facilities work with wildlife. Wasn’t it a wonderful feeling to know you tried to help the sandhill crane? Even though we sometimes fail at saving an animal or bird, it is good to extend compassion and love to creatures, even in their time of death. We can all make a difference, we just need to be cognizant in order to help, and willing to take action.

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment! If I devoted more time to writing and had a camera on me constantly, there would be a LOT MORE “interesting” stories to tell. I enjoy life here, and most of the time I don’t get to document the funny and interesting wildlife happenings because I don’t carry the camera with me all of the time. For instance, I observed four wild deer circling in on a feral cat this morning. The tom cat got cornered in a brush pile, with the deer stomping and snorting at it, circled all around. I found it hilarious that deer do not seem to like cats. I wish I’d had my camera…

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  7. Hi, I soooo recognize the frustration when you do everything in your power to save an animal and then they die 😦 I work as a volunteer in a bird hospital and you always do the best you can, but sometimes that isn’t just enough. But the big reward of course is seeing the ones that did make it, fly away, off into the wild again.
    Thank you for your wonderful post, always a joy to read!
    Greetings from the Netherlands

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    1. Thank you so much! I appreciate your work as a volunteer. It is a difficult and sometimes thankless task, but oh so rewarding when you manage to help a bird achieve freedom and flight again! It is a wonderful thing to give back to nature!

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  8. Wonderful post, Lori! I love knowing that you also rehab birds (as you know, birds have a special place in my heart). Thanks for making a point about how human trash can injure or kill wildlife; I hope your story might make some people be more careful about their discarded fishing lines and other things.

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    1. Thanks Kim – I know your love and devotion to birds!. Sandy Sue made a great suggestion about talking to school children and organizations about how we can help wildlife. I now wish I had photographed the robin with the thread fused into its leg. I was happy to free the robin from the brambles and give it a bit of a fix where the entangled thread bound it to the bush, but I was also horrified that such a simple discarded item could cause a lovely bird so much pain! It could have cost the bird its life had a predator found it tangled! It’s always great to educate people about wildlife and simple ways we can help them survive!

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    1. Thank you Melanie for an important comment! I too, feel there is much more that can be said and done to educate others about helping our wildlife. It simply takes a little compassion and action to get it going.

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  9. I LOVE this post, Big Sister! Your rehabilitating little (and bigger) creatures has certainly been a labor of love, and it’s no wonder you do so well at it; you have so much love to give :-). I admire you and FD for all you do; there is so much we can learn from God’s creatures, big and small. I think Sandy Sue’s suggestion is an awesome one; one that I KNOW you would be wonderful at! I think that just might be something to check into! Lovely Post!!

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    1. Thank you Baby Sister! You know I’m in my element here on this little piece of land, and I have found my niche with wildlife and nature. It does my heart a world of good knowing I can offer help to animals of all kind. I think too, if I can find the courage to get out there and speak about my work, and the needs of wildlife, that it is a good idea to inform people about what they can do to help too! Thank you for your encouragement and love…

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  10. I’m sitting here like a fool, with tears in my eyes, as I read – grateful that you two are strong enough to do what you do and not be dissuaded when a patient of yours doesn’t survive. That there are folks who make this kind of thing their life is a small but bright light on my otherwise dim view of our society. As much as I say I love the animals of the world, I’m a mere onlooker and have no effect. You do, though, and I appreciate it. (Oh, and sorry about my recent flakiness.)

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    1. Ha! No flakiness on your part, since it turned out to be my lack of blogging know how that caused the misunderstanding! Thank you for appreciating what we do here, Sid. I think we all do what we can to help Mother Earth, and all of the inhabitants that roam here. I am fortunate to be able to devote time to the wildlife in our area, and I hope that in some small way I have managed to give back to them… in thanks for what they have shown me.

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  11. Ahh it’s amazing that Frosty vivits back! And you’re doing such a wonderful job 🙂 some think animals don’t form relationships but that’s such crazy talk I can’t even say! Once there’s a bond, it sticks! Even with birds i’ve seen lol.
    Even though they can fly to another country they still come greet you back every once in a while! ^_^

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    1. I think you would enjoy the book, “The Bluebird Effect”, by Julie Zickefoose. http://www.juliezickefoose.com/index.php Specifically, she writes about the bonds formed with birds she rehabilitated or raised. She is also a talented artist, with beautiful drawings and sketches in her book. It is one thing to form a bond with an animal that is raised by a human, but far more fascinating when a human and animal bond without any particular “need” to bond. I believe animals read our energy… I think they know instinctively or see our energy to know that we are “safe”. Thank you for such a wonderful comment!

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      1. Bonding with our energy, I like the idea of that, i’ll be checking her out for sure thanks! 🙂
        It would explain a lot of behavior, like my dog Babette and kitty Tijger, when anyone of us was feeling down at home they would come for a pet.
        Animals are hypersensitive to a lot of things for that matter I think. Once, when I was home alone, I heard a weird sound but there was nothing to be seen.
        However both dog and kitty (sworn enemies LOL) looked up from their nap to stare at that same place for a while like there was something there. We might be hypersensitive too, but our senses get so clouded by everyday life and its ‘rut’ I think! >_<

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        1. I agree with you totally. I believe that normal, daily “noise” clouds our senses, and also that we have grown accustomed to routine. We don’t bother to step outside of the noise and chaos, so often we are completely unaware that another dimension exists! I enjoy my time with Daisy and the many woodland critters that reside here. There is much to learn from simply observing, but it is an even greater gift to have a wild animal make contact. Often, if we just listen, there is a spiritual message.

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  12. Greetings littlesundog! I am Louis, the commentor from Sid’s blog re poison ivy. I certainly admire what you do and I know it takes a special type person to do that. I read your “about link” @ the top and found that fascinating as well. I guess you could say our lives are poles apart as I was born into an Air Force family and lived in many places as a child and knew zip point zero about rural life. I’m telling my age here, but after my father retired last century, my wife and I bought some rural land in 1975 – we were among the bunch of “hippies moving back to the land types.” Since then, I cannot imagine living in a densly populated area so, for us, it wasn’t a fad. My wife’s job forced us to move from eastern Virginia to East-Central Virginia and now we have 16 acres of land approx. 25% open field and 75% wooded. We had to rent a place in a neighborhood while our house was being built that caused me to almost lose my sanity but with the exception of that year, we have lived the rural life from 1975 to present and I ain’t going back. Great to meet you and hope to visit your blog often.

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    1. Well thank you so much!! And welcome to my humble blog. I always felt like I landed on earth at the end of the hippie era… born a little too late, I always felt more a part of the hippie generation of the 60’s. I was born in 1961 by the way! I too, realize I could never go back to living in the city. We are on the outskirts of a small town, so we have the convenience of a community with stores to get staples, but also in the country where we see a lot of wildlife in the woodlands below our home.

      We might be “poles apart” but we’re kindred souls who love nature and wildlife. That’s a strong connection and bond in any part of the world!

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    1. Thank you Karen! Daisy was indeed, a tiny little girl. She’s fairly robust now! It’s been wonderful to watch all of these little charges grow and take off on their own. I look at everything as a learning experience, and that in itself is a success. Even the little critters we couldn’t save taught us something about what it takes to survive. Sometimes death brings about our greatest compassion and love.

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    1. Yes, I will be in the “animal” section!! I’ll probably get there before you do so I’ll keep an eye open for you and Daisy and I will greet you when you arrive!

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  13. All praise to those who give shelter and care to sick and injured wildlife. I am grateful to people such as our local ‘possum lady’, Yvonne Cowling, a licensed wildlife carer whose shelter is in her suburban back yard. Yvonne recently took in an abandonned baby Ring tail possum, I had found whilst I was out walking with my dog.
    Lori, I hope you find the courage to reach out to the wider community to educate people about how to protect wildlife and to garner support for your work.

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    1. I think it is wonderful there are folks in the cities who offer care for wildlife. I often get calls from people many miles away who have difficulty locating a rehabber to help them with an injured or orphaned critter. Anyone can do it, and licensing in most states is minimal in cost and supplies are easier to acquire. With todays networking availability, educational resources are abundant.

      I’m quite the hermit when it comes to the public and speaking in public, but I do feel there is a need to educate people of all ages about protecting wildlife. I know the Oklahoma State Department of Wildlife Conservation has excellent programs for kids, and they do public speaking with groups and schools. I will talk with the game warden about this sometime, and see if there is an additional need in our county and what we can do to bring about a better awareness of our wildlife’s needs and protection of them. Thank you, Margaret, for such a lovely comment!

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  14. Oh, what fun. I am fascinated by animals and will photograph them endlessly. My menagerie at home keeps growing too……but so far, no wild types. By the way, James Heriot is one of my favorite authors. Have you read his books?

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    1. Oh, I LOVE the James Herriot books! I started reading them when I was in my late teens, and acquired the set of books in my mid 20’s. I have read them several times… loving the humor and reality of rural vetting. Isn’t it wonderful to have a menagerie of critters in your home? Even when we’ve integrated a wild orphan of some kind into our home, our dogs have always understood it’s what we do, and everyone seems to get along. There is much to learn about living and life from our animal friends!

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      1. Me too! I have all his books! Sorry to but in, but I love James Herriot! There was also a British series on PBS called “All Creatures Great and Small.” Have you seen it?) ~Lynda

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        1. Yes, Lynda, I have seen the PBS series, although I think the books were a lot better and much more hilarious! I’m going to do a post sometime about all of the “animal” books that I have loved reading. FD actually, has mentioned several that I absolutely fell in love with.

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  15. Your post is really inspiring to me, thanks for sharing! I would love to do what you do one day so it’s really nice to read about your work helping those wonderful animals, btw Daisy deer is the cutest thing I have ever seen!

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    1. What is wonderful is that animal rehabilitation can begin on a small level. We cared for a lot of orphaned doves when we lived in town. Now that we are on this 10 acres, we have the capability of larger mammals. Caring for a little bird or squirrel is just as rewarding as caring for a deer or fox would be. Yes, Daisy is a beauty and quite a lot of entertainment. Why just this morning she pulled my ponytail, nibbled on my jacket pulls, and licked my face and neck thoroughly! Never a dull moment!

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      1. It’s brilliant that you live helping animals, it must be such a nice way of life too. At the moment I am living in a tourist-caravan park that has a LOT of animals and I just love it, but as I’m a a backpacker I’ll be leaving soon- and I don’t want to, it really is great having them around.

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        1. Oh I feel the same way here! If I miss a day of sitting down below, spending a little time with Daisy deer or the little squirrels, or catching a glimpse of Miss Foxy, I feel a little lost. There is something so rewarding and soothing about spending time with nature. Hopefully, you will find other ways and means to be with wildlife… and flourish wherever that happens to be!

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    1. I have a hard time keeping up with all of the blogs I follow these days too! So many times I wish I could do more, but I am content to know that what I do manage to accomplish, makes all the difference in the world to a little critter who eventually ventures out into the wild wonderland!

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  16. Wow! What gorgeous pictures and such noble work! God bless you & your husband. Loved each & every pics in here & esp. the pic in which a squirrel is perched on his shoulder. Beautiful blog, glad to have stumbled upon you! 🙂

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    1. Thank you so much Teju! My journey with Daisy the orphaned deer is well documented in this blog, and I think you will enjoy them. I have also written about Frosty the squirrel and some of our other orphans. I have an appreciation and love of nature and wildlife. I’m so glad you’ve come to visit!

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      1. Life is such a joy when you have beautiful animals around you to share it with. You are truly blessed to have Daisy & Frosty in your life and to be able to be their parent. Stay blessed 🙂

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        1. Yes Teju, it’s true to be blessed by these amazing animals. Many of my posts are about messages or thoughts about what I am to learn from these relationships with nature. With eyes open and ears receptive, there is much to learn from our wild friends!

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